The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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ironmanchef's picture
ironmanchef

there was a bread on the homepage a week or two go that had a beautiful loaf made with yeast and oatmeal. I bookmarked it but somehow it got lost. Can anyone provide a link?

thanks in advance

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

My father and my next door neighbor have both confirmed that Field Blend No.2 from Ken Forkish's Flour Water Salt Yeast is the best bread they've ever eaten.  I happen to enjoy it a lot.  To date, it has consistently produced the best tasting loaf for me.

The four loaves pictured were proofed overnight in two different fridges.  The front/expanded loaves were proofed and baked straight out of the main fridge.  The rear/undersized loaves were proofed in a 4.3 cubic foot fridge and taken out and left on the counter while the first loaves were baking (they seemed to be under proofed when I checked on them, so I wanted to let them warm up a bit).  I need to check the small fridge temperature, which we just started using.

The crumb on one of the smaller loaves looks like this:

As usual, there is peanut butter here because it is my lunch I am eating. It is a mixed levain and yeasted dough. I don't particularly enjoy having to add yeast and understand that I can probably omit the yeast and proof overnight on the counter instead of the fridge, and one day I will try this and report back. 

The reason I prefer this bread to the overnight country brown from the same book is because I find that making that bread, the way I do it, produces a loaf that is more sour than I enjoy. That is not to say that this would be the case if someone else were making the loaves.  I do not (for either loaf) usually use starter that was last fed 24 hours ago to build the levain. Instead, it is usually more like week old starter, fed 12 hours before, used to build my levain.  It just turns out that when I make the overnight country brown this way, it comes out more sour than I like. But when I make the field blend no. 2 this way, it comes out tasting really mellow.

greenbriel's picture
greenbriel

Certainly understanding why folks get obsessed with the chase for baguette perfection. I think the last round were better shaped, these had better positioning of slashes (more parallel with the loaf than before), but I need to work on consistent depth of cuts. 

Taste was better as this was an overnight dough, and I'm quite happy with the crumb. Hoping to try a levain batch soon, but my starter seems to be losing vigor :( Might have to try the pineapple juice if I need to start again.

isand66's picture
isand66

    This was supposed to be a Sprouted Durum loaf but I have not had time to do any sprouting lately.  I pulled out my mill and in went the durum berries and out came fresh Durum flour.  My mill does have its limitation so I have not been doing any sifting therefore the flour in this case was not as fine as store bought.

I decided to add some barley flour to try and get a little more nutty flavor and some egg yolks and butter to soften the crumb a bit.

The final bread was a little dry for my tastes but still tasted great.  Next time I would definitely up the water content to over 80% which would open up the crumb more and improve the overall bread.

MAIN

Formula

Fresh Milled Durum Barley Egg Bread  (%)

Fresh Milled Durum Barley Egg Bread  (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

Closeup1

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), egg yolks and softened butter and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.  I added some sesame seeds to the bottom of the basket before I put the dough in works well for adhering the seeds.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

 

isand66's picture
isand66

 I have not had much time to post lately since I returned to work full time a two months ago, so this one is from a couple of weeks ago.

I wanted to make a hearty loaf and I decided to use some of the Angry Orchard Hard Cider I had on hand.  Normally I would create a soaker with the grains but this particular mix from KAF is fine to just add to the main dough ingredients as is.  The Harvest Grain mix contains whole oat berries, millet, rye flakes, sesame seeds, and sunflower seeds.

The end result of this particular mix of whole grains and flours was a nice tasty loaf with a moderately open crumb and a nice thick crust perfect for a cold winter night.

Closeup1

Formula

Multi-Grain Cider Bread (%)

Multi-Grain Cider Bread (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

closeup3

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, Harvest Grain blend and Hard Cider together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and walnut oil, and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Closeup2

Crumb


 

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

A friend had never used the dough hook on his kitchenaid and wanted to try making bread. So the night before we made a poolish for him, and we spent the day creating two simple loaves.

PY's picture
PY

This is supposed to be vollkornbrot and yes, i'm supposed to wait at least 24 hours before i can eat it. But really it looks inedible...literally, heavy as a brick.

the recipe called for only 6g of SD in the perferment which is only to sit for 1.5 hours. After that all igredients are mixed, patted into a loaf pan and proofed for 2 hours. I followed the recipe. But it lookes as though it's gone haywire?

total rye flour was 560g with 480g water. Any idea what went wrong?

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

The idea here was of course to add the flavor of carmelized onion, but I wanted it in a decorative swirl in the bread. This was my basic levain. Inset on the picture shows the result. Just what I wanted.

Justin C's picture
Justin C

Hello everyone,

As most of you know, Chinese New Year is February 19 this year and to celebrate the Year of the Goat, I baked one at my bakery I work part-time at. The quality is a little shoddy on my cellphone camera but I'm still really proud of it considering it's my 3rd decorated bread I've done at work!

Originally, the head baker was going to shape the bread, but he forgot about the spare dough until just before his shift ended. So he entrusted the dough with me and this is what I did:

Firstly if any of you are interested, the leftover dough used was an enriched-yeast dough used for savoury meat rolls. I rolled it into one big oblong rectangle first and stretched one end to form the head, using a sharp pizza-cutter to shape out the neck. The scrap dough from the neck was rested for a while to relax the gluten while I worked trimming off the body of the goat and shaping the tail. When relaxed, I rolled two pieces of scrap dough as though I were shaping a baguette and flattened them slightly with a rolling pin to make the horns. Scrap pieces were lined on the horns to make them look curvy but I think next time I'll try to roll them thinner to make it look more attractive. The curves on a real horn are more like imprints right? but the curves I made stuck out a little like a sore thumb.

The rest of the scraps were shaped roughly into rectangles for the feet and trimmed into shape with the pizza cutter. The scraps from that were rolled again into a tapered cylinder and folded in half to make the hooves. The last tidbits I had left were amalgamated and used to make the numbers "2015", but I guess I worked too quickly and they came out a little unreadable after baking. 

A quick slash with the pizza cutter gave way to the mouth of the goat and the big round end of a piping tip was pressed into the eye spots to make a cavity for the raisins. Little snips of kitchen scissors were judiciously used to give the goat a little shaggy texture which disappeared a bit after the dough was proofed in a commercial proofer for around 30 minutes. After drying a bit, I eggwashed the dough, pressed the raisins in a little further into the eye cavity to make sure they didn't pop right off while baking and put the pan in the deck oven for 20 minutes at 450 degrees Fahrenheit.

In total, I probably spent an hour from start to finish. My boss was pretty satisfied with the end result and so was the head baker who congratulated me the week later while we were sipping some coffee together. It was a great experience to get creative using bread as a medium, and I highly recommend you to try it some time whenever you have a little extra dough kicking around. 

Cheers,

Justin C

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