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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I guess this isn’t technically a white bread but is about as close a Lucy gets to one at 23% whole grain with all the whole grains sprouted, dried and milled at home.  This one was a little bit different with the hydration reduced to 73% making for a much  less sloppy dough than usual.

 

The whole grains used were wheat, emmer, spelt and rye this time and the lower hydration required 2 slaps to 1 fold when we got around to doing them.  We sifted the sprouted grain and used the 28% hard bits to feed the 3 stage levain as usual.  This week the 8 g of rye sour starter used had been retarded in the fridge for 8 weeks and the levain ended up being 13% of the flour.

 

We built the levain on a heating pad, per our winter method, and after the levain had doubled after the 3rd feeding, we retarded it for 16 hours instead of our usual 24 hours.  Once the levain came out of the fridge the next day we warmed it up for 1 hour on the heating pad as we autolysed the dough flour and water with the salt sprinkled on top.

 

The white flour was a 50 / 50 mix of KA bread flour and LaFama AP.  Once everything came together in the mixing bowl we did 3 sets of slap and folds of 7,1 and 1 minute and 3 stets of stretch and folds from the compass points.  All the dough development exercises were done on 20 minute intervals.

 

The dough was rested between manipulations in an oiled SS bowl on the heating pad between manipulations.  The dough was pre-shaped, then final shaped 10 minutes later, placed seam side down in a rice floured basket, bagged and placed into the fridge for a 16 hour retard in place of out usual 12 hour one.

 

Once the dough came out of the fridge the next morning we let it warm up on the counter for an hour and half before firing up BOB to 500 F with the Lodge combo cooker inside.  We planned to watch it closely after over baking last week’s first attempt with the cooker due to a faulty probe thermometer.  So this week’s theme is’ no thermometer means better bread in the end!

 

The blisters even showed themselves on the bottom!  This bread made for a fine lunch sandwich with turkey pastrmi and the usual fruits, berries veggies and salad.

Since the bread was baked seam side up, no slashing was required.  After upending the dough onto parchment the transfer to the hot combo cooker was easy as pie.  Once the cooker went into the oven we turned the oven down to 450 F for 20 minutes of steam instead of 15 like last week..

 

Once the lid came off we turned the oven down to 425 F – convection this time.  The bread sprang and bloomed well under steam. And 5 minutes under the lower dry heat we took the bread off the cooker bottom and finished baking it on the stone. 10 minutes after the lid came off, 30 minutes total, we called the loaf done, turned off the oven and let it sit on the stone for 5 more minutes and then transferred it to a cooling rack.

 

It browned and blistered well enough and the bottom thump sounded hollow too.  We will have to wait and see how the crumb came out with the much lower hydration of this bake.  The crust is thin and softly chewy.  The crumb is  soft, open, moist and glossy.  The taste is superb!  I prefer it to the same bread made with the same but not sprouted  whole grains.  We will have to see what the wife says about it tonight.  I can see olive oil, Parmesan, Pecorino, fresh basil, and roseary with a grind or 3 of pepper on a plate for dipping right now. 

 

This bread cost 95 cents to make including energy costs.  If you include the combo cooker, baking stones, dehydrator and mill this loaf of sprouted SD was only $300 :-)  We would like to try this recipe at 30% whole sprouted grains to see lf we like that version better. Nothing like a new style of SFSD to play around with.....

For those using thermometers, now that I have new batteries in mine, we baked this bread to 207 F.  After letting  it sit  in the off oven for 5 more minutes,  it hit 209 F.

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

8 Week Retarded Rye Sour Starter

8

0

0

8

1.74%

72% Extraction Sprouted Multigrain

0

0

26

26

5.66%

28% Extract Sprouted Multigrain

8

16

6

30

6.54%

Water

8

16

32

56

12.20%

Total

24

32

64

120

26.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

60

13.07%

 

 

 

Water

60

13.07%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

13.07%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

72% Extract Sprouted Multigrain

47

10.24%

 

 

 

KA Bread & La Fama AP 50/50

352

76.69%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

399

86.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.96%

 

 

 

Water

275

59.91%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

68.92%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

459

 

 

 

 

Water

335

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

72.98%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

803

 

 

 

 

% Whole Sprouted Grain

23.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Whole sprouted grains include equal

 

 

 

 

 

amounts of rye, spelt, emmer (farro) & wheat

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucy reminds us not to forget the salad or even the smoked chicken noodle soup:-) 

 

dosco's picture
dosco

Howdy ... I haven't posted in awhile, although I've still been baking, focusing on using Reinhart's BBA basic sourdough recipe (20.25oz flour, 10.2 oz starter, .50 oz salt, and 15.2 oz water). For Christmas I received 2 cane brotforms and so I've moved from batards to boules (although I did also get a linen towel that I plan on using as a couche for batards in the future).

 

Attached are a few pics. The main blog pic is a bake from last week (crumb of that loaf is posted below). It uses the BBA basic SD recipe but has been modified to include several types of flour: KAF bread flour, KAF AP flour, KAF white whole wheat, sprouted wheat flour, and rye flour (the list is in order from most to least). Oven spring was so-so, crumb is OK. I've been working on getting good gluten development at 70%-plus hydration, which after experimentation (using my Kitchen Aid) is about 15 minutes for dough made mostly from KAF bread flour, and about 20 minutes if I use half KAF bread flour with whole wheat/rye. I knead for 5 minutes, then let the dough rest for 5 to 10 minutes, then knead again for 5 min, etc.

 

For Christmas I also got a copy of Forkish's FWSY, so I've been also experimenting with autolysing from 1 hour to 12 hours.

Shaping boules is a bit different than batards, which had been giving me some problems. Most recent bake (baked on the night of 1-14-2015) is also attached, on this version I modified the BBA recipe by upping the hydration to 76% and also did a pre-shape and a final shaping (previously I had only been pre-shaping). The oven spring is much better.

 

At the moment I have the next dough proofing after the pre-shape, it is a modified BBA recipe to 79% hydration.

 

Happy New Year!

 

Regards-

Dave

 

ANNA GIORDANI's picture
ANNA GIORDANI

 

Adoro la Farina di Frumento Integrale e il Lievito Madre. Una metodica attenta nella sua lavorazione, ci regala prodotti dal gusto e dalla consistenza straordinari.

Adoro affondare le mani nel sacco della Farina per poter percepire quella impalpabile e setosa consistenza, resa un po' grossolana dalla crusca del chicco.

Adoro impastarla, lentamente, senza stressarla per assecondare la sua idratazione e la sua elasticità.

Adoro la magia dell'impasto che lievita e comprendere le leggi della fisica e della chimica.

Adoro che nel più assoluto e rigoroso silenzio avvenga il processo della sua trasformazione.

Adoro stare davanti al forno in attesa che si compia l'alchimia della cottura del pane.

E sono felice quando penso che in tutto ciò ci sia anche un po' di me, anche se in fondo ho aggiunto soltanto un pizzico del mio ingrediente segreto: 

LA MIA E LA VOSTRA PASSIONE.......

A presto e buon fine settimana a tutti voi, carissimi amici.

Anna

http://ilchiccoelaspiga.blogspot.it/2015/01/lievito-madre-e-farina-di-frumento.html

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Nothing really special or adventurous here. Baked some seeded loaves and kept one for some cheese that I thought would be a perfect pairing (it was). As I sat down in the sunshine and took the first slice, I decided to take a picture to share or at least to serve a record for myself. 

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

Since discovering the wonderful challenge of sourdough, I've experimented with a wide range of levain percentages, fermentation times, proof times, etc.

Most of the sources I've read have warned against too-high-hopes for sourdough ovenspring. Sometimes, a baker just wants to see that sourdough CAN really get a rise. 

In my very limited experience: Preparing a dough with a significant percentage of levain + retarding during bulk fermentation + relatively short  room temperature proof = great ovenspring. Oh, and not getting too wild with hydration helps too...although I'm finding that it's hard not to add more water during bulk fermentation, even if I'm going for 70-72% hydration. Wetter dough almost feels "healthier" and easier to work with, but that's probably because I've been using slaps and stretches rather than traditional kneading. The levain in this formula is about 28% of the final dough.

Whenever I  have tried to use this high percentage of levain in a cold-proofed loaf, I have unwittingly over-proofed over night. Such a bummer. See, I really feel like the bulk needs to be at MINIMUM 2.5 hours, with stretches, in order to adequately develop gluten. Retarding during bulk rather than proof seems so much more forgiving, and that's why it's included in this particular formula. 

The Confidence Formula:

Day 1, Morning: Create Levain

100 g 100% SD starter

100 g AP FL

100g water

Ferment for 8-12 hours

Day 1, Evening:

Mix 350g flour (whatever combination of types) with levain

Add 220-240g water

Rest (this is sort of a "faux-autolyse," emphasizing the exclusion of salt over the exclusion of leaven...)

Rest for 30 minutes

Add 11 g salt

Add 5 g malt 

Stretch and fold every 30 minutes for 2 hours 

Rest on the counter for 2 hours

Refrigerate for anywhere from 6 to 72 hours

Day 2

Shape and proof for 1.5 hours

Bake at 450 for 30 minutes with steam, 15-20 without. 

Good Spring! Always good spring with this levain percentage, slightly lower hydration, and approach to bulk fermentation. And a more open crumb than I might have imagined for this goal!

Some bonus pics from the week: SD baked with Lagunita's Brown Shugga beer, and a browned butter SD that tasted sort of like brioche! 

 

One thing I will say is that the crust is never as magically blistered with a shorter proof as it is with a long cold proof. But the flexibility of long cold bulk, and the spring...I'll take the trade, at least some of the time!

The grand SD experiment continues.....

--Hannah

 

 

jeano's picture
jeano

 

Also holes. Hammelman's whole wheat Levain, with a bit of spelt extricated from the depths of the freezer.

magic big fang's picture
magic big fang

I am a Chinese ,and I just arrived in America last month to accompany my husband who studys further in NY.Before I went abroad,I have been interested in bakery and tried to do some cakes and breads. In Shanghai ,I was busy finishing my study so that there weren't much time for me to realize my hobby.Meanwhile,some ingredients are unavailable in shanghai. I'm glad that I have a better condition for bakery now.

In my country, a number of people like bakery as well.They recommended the book <The Bread Baker's Apprentice>.The recipes from Pierre herme are popular,too.So,i wonder what is the most popular baking book for amateur.I am a new hand ,and I have desire to improve my baking skill. Could anyone give me some advice?Thx a lot!

 

 

 

magic big fang's picture
magic big fang

I am a Chinese ,and I just arrived in America last month to accompany my husband who studys further in NY.Before I went abroad,I have been interested in bakery and tried to do some cakes and breads. In Shanghai ,I was busy finishing my study so that there weren't much time for me to realize my hobby.Meanwhile,some ingredients are unavailable in shanghai. I'm glad that I have a better condition for bakery now.

In my country, a number of people like bakery as well.They recommended the book <The Bread Baker's Apprentice>.The recipes from Pierre herme are popular,too.So,i wonder what is the most popular baking book for amateur.I am a new hand ,and I have desire to improve my baking skill. Could anyone give me some advice?Thx a lot!

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The Sourdough Seed Bread was one of the first formulas I baked after buying Hamelman's Bread, and I thought it was one of the best tasting breads I had every had. I believe it's been  more than two years since I have baked it, and I wondered why I hadn't made it more often after tasting a slice last night. It is really good.

I made a bit over 2 kg of dough and divided it into 3 equal pieces. In order to bake all three at once on my baking stone, I shaped two bâtards and one boule and placed them with the bâtards kind of in an L configuration and the boule between the two arms. It worked well. 

This bread always has really great oven spring and bloom for me.

The crust is very crunchy.The crumb was quite tender and pretty open. The aroma and flavor of the flaxseeds is very present in this bread. I happen to like that a lot.  The bread is delicious plain or toasted. I had a slice last night with a thin spread of sweet butter and had a couple more slices toasted for breakfast with almond butter and apricot preserves. It's also very good with cheese. Just good bread.

David

Floydm's picture
Floydm

As I mentioned in my last post, I've been working on a Polish Rye recipe.  I baked it again this weekend and this time took notes.

Preferment

  • 180g AP flour
  • 120g water
  • a pinch of salt
  • a pinch of instant yeast

Final dough

  • All of the preferment
  • 120g rye flour
  • 460g AP flour
  • 40g potato flour
  • 12g sea salt
  • 30g barley malt syrup
  • 3g yeast
  • ~360g warm water

The colour comes more from the malt syrup than the rye flour.  Still not perfect, but we really like it.

 * * * 

Unrelated, but I also realized this weekend that TFL is 10 years old as of yesterday.  The first post is here.  Kinda neat... I certainly did not foresee that it'd end up growing to be such a rich community of bakers from all around the globe. 

 

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