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zcacfxk's picture
zcacfxk

It came out really well. Using AP white flour and 70% water

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We had this left over white starter that we converted from the 3 rd day toss of the rye starter we made for last Friday’s rye SD bread bake and needed a recipe to use a bit of it up.  Lucy came through with a sprouted 5 grain recipe that included 50% whole grains and some cracked flax seeds. 

 

Breads similar to this one make up our ‘sort of standard’ everyday sandwich bread when we aren’t eating some other kind.  Flax seeds have all kinds of health benefits but they are usually not accessible to the human body because their shell is so hard and fibrous.  Cracking them makes this problem moot.

 

Half the grains are whole and half of them were sprouted making this a very healthy and nutritious bread that is full of vitamins and minerals.  We sifted out the hard bits and fed them first to the levain, as per our usual routine, but only had time to retard the finished levain for 2 hours

 

The levain was about 75% larger than our normal summer amount coming it at near 18% pre-fermented flour.  As the levain warmed up on the counter, we autolyzed the dough flour and potato water with the salt sprinkled on top.  The final hydration was a bit over 80% - very low for a bread of this type for us. 

 

Once the levain hit the mix, we did 3 sets of slap and folds of 30 slaps and 3 sets of 10 slaps al on 20 minute intervals.  The cracked flax went in at the beginning of the first 10 slap set and were through incorporated by the end of the third.  One the gluten development was done we placed the dough in an oiled bowl, covered it with plastic and put it in the fridge for an 18 hour retard in the fridge.

 

Once the dough came out of the fridge, we let it warm up for an hour before pre-shaping and then final shaping using a new design for a chacon that we picked up off the Italian shaping video posted on TFL earlier this week.  Once it was bagged and proofed, we chucked it into a 450 F preheated Combo Cooker.

 

After 18 minutes the lid came off and we turned the oven down to 425 F convection.  After 5 minutes of dry heat we removed the bread from the CC and placed it on the bottom stone to finish baking and to make sure the bottom didn’t over bake.   

 

It did bloom and spring well with the design coming though nicely.  It also browned up but didn’t blister all that much.  Nothing like a chacon to make a bread extra special for the holiday.

We will have to see how the crumb came out one the chacon cools and we slice it for lunch.  This bread came out very soft and moist....and seedy in a nice way.  Just as delicious as it is healthy and hearty.  It will make a fine sandwich bread  for some of that pulled pork which will go great with Pumpkin Eggnog Cupcakes.

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

1 Week Retarded WhRyeite  Sour

20

0

0

20

3.92%

20 % Ext. Sprouted & Whole 5 Grain

20

25

2

47

9.22%

80% Ext. Sprouted & Whole 5  Grain

0

0

33

33

6.47%

Water

20

25

35

80

15.69%

Total

60

50

70

180

35.29%

      

Levain Totals

 

%

   

Sprouted &  Whole 5  Grains

90

17.65%

   

Water

90

17.65%

   

Levain Hydration

100.00%

    
      

Dough Flour

 

%

   

LaFama AP

250

49.02%

   

80% Ext. Sprouted & Whole 5  Grain

170

33.33%

   

Total Dough Flour

420

82.35%

   

 

 

 

   

Salt

10

1.96%

   

Potato Water

320

62.75%

   
      

Dough Hydration

76.19%

    

Total Flour w/ Starter

510

    

Potato Water 320 & Water

410

    
      

Hydration with Starter

80.39%

    

Total Weight

1,005

    

% Whole Sprouted Grain

50.98%

    
      

Flax Seeds

25

4.90%

   
      

Sprouted and Whole 5 grain flour is equal amounts

    

of rye, spelt, Kamut, barley and wheat

     

 

Have a salad with that fine smoked pork butt.

 

Sitopoios's picture
Sitopoios

Wonderful bread to slightly dilute the rye sorts. Crust is crispy, crumb with a delicate taste, not sour bread.

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

Most ginger cake recipes contain too much sugar, molasses and butter for my taste. I found this one online. It is mainly sweetened by dates and I replaced the molasses with malt extract (no molasses on hand at the time). It is not a very sweet cake at all, somewhere between a loaf and a cake. Made with spelt flour and was left to rise for about 8 hours. Great with butter and it even makes good toast.

 

alfanso's picture
alfanso

Jeffrey Hamelman's pain au levain with mixed sourdough starters.  I've made this before as both baguettes and batards.  So this is nothing new now, although it has still only been a small handful of bakes so far.  I like the concept of the two starters, one stiff and one quite liquid.  As much for an interesting change of pace as well as the process.

What is important to me is consistency.  I want to need to feel as though I can create and then recreate, pretty faithfully, the same breads time after time.  At this point, after a little over two years of home baking, I probably have about 20 different breads or more in my rotation, some revisited way more frequently than others.  But it is the ability to come back to, to return to a prior bread, and then be able to do it again.  To make it look as though it could have been part of that prior bake.  That is an accomplishment that I can feel good about.  And it's happening with regularity now.

There's a ton about baking, even some of the basics, that is still beyond my grasp at this stage, but that's okay.  I seem to have found my niche, my wavelength where I can operate well.  I'll learn more over time, but as I'm not obsessive about any of this, that "over time" will have a long duration.  And I'm quite comfortable with that.  I'm not that young impetuous kid anymore.  He lives in the past.  Baking and learning slow as I go is my present, and hopefully my future too.

Just of the heck of it, here are a pair of pictures from the prior bake in October...

Update: 12/16

That consistency continues to permeate from one bake to the next, further evidence that repetitive results can be achieved.  

Here is a batch of Hamelman's Pain au Levain with WW (with a single stiff bread flour starter here), also something that I've made as both baguettes and batards and posted previously.  These completed bulk fermenting on the bench at 11 PM Monday night and then retarded as bulk.  Tuesday early AM they were divided, shaped, couched and then returned to the refrigerator.  I got around to baking these on Tuesday evening at ~9 PM.  As usual, directly from retard into oven.  Therefore these had a 22 hour retard in total, well beyond what I think is the recommended retard time frame.

I wonder at what point the acids in the levain start to break down the gluten structure.  These may have shown the first effects of that, but I'm not good enough or knowledgeable enough to know that yet.

Sitopoios's picture
Sitopoios

The bread is thanks to its distinctive dark, aromatic crust and the mild crumb the ideal base for a variety of sandwiches with smoked sausage or old cheeses.

I make 2 bread. One of them with poolish that was 22 hours in the refrigerator (about +5C) and another one with poolish in the my kitchen (about +23C) 20 hours. Breads has different taste! 

Spelt poolish, Rye sourdough

JeffRo's picture
JeffRo

A very good friend of mine is originally from the Boston area. During a recent conversation he told me about what he knew as "Star Bread". He says it is one of his favorites from back home, and that he hasn't been able to find it anywhere else.

If you try to Google-Sleuth information about this bread, you will find that it is quite difficult to dig up any solid information about it. Most results are from folks with a similar nostalgia who are looking to find Star Bread somewhere... anywhere. I did find this other TFL post very helpful... much thanks LarAl

After I spent some quality "Indiana Jones" time on the web, I discovered that what folks from New England refer to as 'Star Bread" is actually a variation of something also known as "Italian Horn Bread". Which, in turn, is an Americanized variation of an old bread making method and formula that originates in Ferrara, Italy. An example of this bread making method is Coppia Ferrarese. A bread steeped in rich Italian history and heritage.

Since the method and formula for this bread is wrapped up in Italian regulations, most of the information that I dug up had to be translated so that I could understand it. (Thank you Google Translate.)

Here is a site with a decent formula for Coppia Ferrarese that has been translated into English...
Traditional Sourdough Pork Fat Bread: the "Coppia Ferrarese".

I followed this formula somewhat closely. My only changes were that I (1) reduced the bakers measurements, (2) used a 56% hydrated biga (pre-fermented for ~14 hours) and (3) used vegetable shortening instead of lard (pork fat).

Ingredients:

600g bread flour
175g warm water
100g biga (56% hydrated made 14 hours before)
12g salt
10g active dry yeast
56g vegetable shortening

When forming the loaves, I tried to follow techniques shown in these YouTube Videos:
Balboni's
Pane di pasta dura o ferrarese di Osvy

After formed, and allowed to proof for a short while, the loaves were baked at 425F for ~25 minutes.

The attached photo above is of my finished product.

I gave a couple of the loaves to my friend and he was pleasantly surprised. He said that the texture and flavor was spot on! However, he does remember that the loaves were larger, so next time I will double the formula.

The dough is very stiff. I had to let it rest quite a few times while I worked with it. In addition I sprayed it with water a few times to keep it pliable and supple. I think that next time I will use a 100% hydrated poolish as the preferment. This will allow a bit more hydration for the final dough. 

The hunt for this bread was a blast, and was very fun to make!
But, more importantly, I got to share with a good friend a small taste of "home".

- Jeff 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Walnut-Fig Sourdough Bread: Variation on a favorite from SFBI Artisan II

David Snyder

7 December, 2015

This blog entry could have been titled “So many breads, so little time.” Or “time flies when you're having fun.”

One of my favorite breads from the San Francisco Baking Institute sourdough workshop I took in December, 2010 was a sourdough Raisin-Walnut bread. I made it at home a couple weeks after I got home from the workshop, and it was really delicious, even without a deck oven bake. I wrote about it back then and said I expected to make it often. Ha! I not only haven't made it since then, I couldn't even remember that I had made it at home. All I remembered was that brother Glenn and his wife particularly liked it.

Well, I suppose I could also title this entry “Better late than never,” because I made this bread again yesterday, only substituting diced dried figs for the raisins, and all I can say is, “I should have been making it often,” because it is truly a delicious bread – I think my favorite of the many combinations of sourdough-dried fruit/toasted nut breads I have made.

 

Total Formula

Baker's%

Wt. (g)

AP Flour (11.7% protein)

71.57

383

Whole Wheat Flour

19.77

106

Rye Flour (Medium rye)

8.66

46

Water

67.62

362

Yeast (Instant)

0.08

1

Walnuts (toasted)

15.81

85

Dried Calmyrna figs (diced)

19.77

106

Salt

2.13

11

Total

205.41

1100

 

Firm Levain

Baker's%

Wt. (g)

AP Flour (11.7% protein)

95

77

Rye Flour (Medium rye)

5

4

Water

50

40

Active firm starter

60

48

Total

210

169

  1. Dissolve the firm starter in the water.

  2. Add the flours and mix and knead until there is no visible dry flour.

  3. Shape into a ball. Place in a clean bowl. Cover tightly.

  4. Allow to ferment overnight (12 hours at room temperature).

  5. Toast shelled walnuts, broken or chopped coarsely, at 300ºF for 8 minutes. Allow to cool then place in a jar or bowl and cover.

  

Final Dough

Wt. (g)

AP Flour (11.7% protein)

275

Whole Wheat Flour

106

Rye Flour (Medium rye)

42

Water

305

Yeast (Instant)

1

Walnuts (toasted)

85

Dried Calmyrna figs (diced)

106

Salt

11

Firm Levain

169

Total

1100

Procedures

  1. Pour the water into the bowl of a stand mixer.

  2. Add the flours and mix with the paddle attachment at slow speed until a shaggy mass is formed. The dough should be medium soft.

  3. Remove the paddle. Scrape the dough together. Cover the mixer bowl and let it rest for 20-60 minutes.

  4. Cut the hard stems off the dried figs. Cut the figs into medium dice (about the size of raisins). Place the diced figs in a fine sieve and run water over them, mixing them with your fingers and separating the pieces stuck together. Place the sieve over a bowl to drain until ready to mix the figs into the dough.

  5. Sprinkle the salt and the yeast over the dough. Add the firm levain in several pieces. Mix with the hook attachment at slow speed for 1 or 2 minutes, then increase the speed to Speed 2 and mix for 5-8 minutes. D.D.T. is 78-80ºF.

  6. When moderate gluten development has been achieved, scrape down the dough. Add the figs and walnuts to the mixer bowl and mix with the hook at slow speed for 2 to 3 minutes.

  7. Transfer the dough to a floured board and knead it for a couple minutes to better distribute the nuts and figs. Then transfer it to a lightly oiled bowl and cover.

  8. Ferment for 2 hours at 76ºF with a stretch and fold at 60 minutes.

  9. Divide into two equal pieces and pre-shape as boules. Cover and let the gluten relax for 20-30 minutes.

  10. Shape as bâtards and place, seam-side up, in floured brotformen or onto a linen couche.

  11. Cover and proof for 90 to 120 minutes at 80ºF.

  12. Pre-heat oven to 500ºF with baking stone and steaming apparatus in place for 45-60 minutes before baking.

  13. Transfer loaves to a peel. Turn down oven to 460ºF. Score the loaves as desired. Steam the oven. Load the loaves onto the stone.

  14. After12 minutes, remove the steam source. If you have a convection oven, switch on the fan and reduce the temperature to 435ºF. Bake for 12-14 minutes more. The loaves are done when nicely browned, they sound hollow when thumped on the bottom and the internal temperature is over 205ºF.

  15. Optionally, leave the loaves on the baking stone with the oven turned off and the door ajar for another 8-10 minutes to further dry the crust.

  16. Transfer to a cooling rack and cool completely before slicing.

The crust was quite crunchy. The crumb was light and quite tender. (I think the tiny bit of instant yeast really contributed to the nice crumb texture.) The flavor is complex with clear elements of sourdough, with a lovely, creamy lactic acid predominating, toasted walnuts and sweet, chewy figs.

This bread is probably a pretty well-balanced meal eaten plain, but it is wonderful with sweet butter, toasted or not, and with almond butter. All the sourdough breads with nuts I have made are great with cheese. Walnut breads with thin slices of Cotswold cheese is a great combination. I am thinking this bread might make extraordinary French toast. Breakfast tomorrow?

Yesterday, I also made a couple loaves of Hamelman's “Pain au Levain with Whole Wheat Flour.” They were retarded overnight and baked today.

Today, I made Hamelman's “5 Grain Sourdough” which is now retarding to bake tomorrow. (You know, I was out of town for Thanksgiving, which brother Glenn and his wife hosted this year. So my baking itch needed serious scratching this week. By the way, that “Pain au Levain with Whole Wheat Flour” makes pretty wonderful Thanksgiving dressing. My wife makes the 3-onion stuffing from a 1995 Gourmet magazine.)

Happy baking!

David

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

100% Organic White Spelt Flour. A tiny bit disappointed that they did not rise more. I thought that the spelt flour gives it a subtle hint of caramel flavour. My partner tasted them and commented, "Mmm, these panini have attitude". 

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