The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
DesigningWoman's picture

What went wrong? This was supposed to be a sandwich loaf!

April 17, 2019 - 8:59am -- DesigningWoman

Big befuddlement! I wanted to make a sandwich loaf for a friend and followed Trevor's recipe, which seemed easy enough. I halved the recipe to make one 21cm loaf. The only thing I did differently was to let it bulk at room temperature for an hour before retarding it overnight (he does say in the comments that the dough can handle a retard of up to 24 hours). Took it out of the fridge, warmed it up for maybe an hour, preshaped, rested, shaped and proofed before baking.

Tandem Tails's picture

Brewers Spent Grain Sourdough

April 17, 2019 - 7:58am -- Tandem Tails

I brew beer pretty regularly and one of the byproducts of the mashing process is a bunch of grain that's had all of the sugars removed from it. I usually compost it but every once in a while I dry it out in the oven and then grind it into a flour.  

I've found that when added at about 10% to bread or pizzas, it gives a really nice nuttiness and boosts the whole grain flavor.  Any more than 10% and it starts to make the dough very tough.

Abe's picture

How quickly does a barm preferment...?

April 17, 2019 - 6:09am -- Abe
Forums: 

How quickly does a barm preferment, made from equal amounts of barm to flour by weight, take to activate and be ready to use in a dough?

...and just to be sure is the barm the froth on top of the brewing beer? Or will the beer itself, at this stage, have enough yeast floating about to activate a preferment? How long does it keep in the fridge?

Thank you.

adelie's picture

Bulk ferment for Bagels?

April 16, 2019 - 9:40pm -- adelie
Forums: 

Hi bakers,

Recently, I've been looking at bagel recipes and I've noticed that some of them call for a bulk ferment after kneading, while others shape the dough directly after kneading. Does the bulk ferment have a significant purpose? How does it affect the end product?

Also, if anyone has any good bagel recipes they could recommend, they would be greatly appreciated :)

 Thanks!

Yippee's picture
Yippee

If you are looking for a quick and fool-proof method to create a starter that has a high concentration of lactic acid, check out Rus' CLAS procedures on YouTube and Blogger. Mind you though, the formula uses commercial yeast ("CY") to boost leavening power because CLAS is yeast-free.  If you're a hard-core purist who does not use CY,  this method is not for you.

 

Thanks to Rus for sharing this opening technology with us!

 

 

 

 

 

 100% Rye

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pH @ 1500 hr

 

 

 

 

 

 

@ 2400 hr

 

 

 

 

 

pH @ 2400 hr, it's ready for bread making 

 

 

 

 

 

pH after refreshment; acidity continues to increase

 

 

Roger Lambert's picture
Roger Lambert

Sour dough can be made using the contents of probiotic capsules containing Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). I have made these sour doughs for a few years now and they come out nicely with just the right amount of sour that I enjoy.
dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Mixed Grain Sourdough

David Snyder

April, 2019

 

For this week's bakes, I am returning to my variations on Ken Forkish's “Field Blend #2.” The flour mix used is the same as that of several previous bakes, except that the Whole Wheat flour used is “Warthog” hard red Winter wheat. One of the bakers I follow on Instagram swears by this variety, so I though I would try it. What I found right away was that it seems a lot less thirsty than any of the other hard red Winter wheats I have used to date. So I did reduce the hydration slightly and still ended up with a much slacker dough than expected.

I made two loaves with this dough. One was retarded for about 20 hours. The other loaf was retarded for about 44 hours.

Total dough

 

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bakers' %

All purpose (AP) flour

700

70

Whole Wheat (WW) flour

125

12.5

Whole Rye flour

75

7.5

Whole Spelt flour

100

10

Water

760

76

Salt

21

2.1

Total

1781

180.1

 

Levain

 

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

Bakers' %

All purpose (AP) flour

144

75

Whole Wheat (WW) flour

36

25

Water (85-90ºF)

144

75

Active Starter (100% hydration)

36

25

Total

360

200

  1. Dissolve the starter in the water, add the flours and mix thoroughly.

  2. Place in a clean bowl and cover tightly.

  3. Ferment at 80ºF until doubled in volume.

  4. The levain can be used immediately or refrigerated for up to 3 days. If refrigerated, I take it out 2 hours before I am going to incorporate it into the final dough. In general, this means I take it out when I am ready to mix the autolyse.

 

Final Dough

 

Ingredient

Wt (g)

All purpose (AP) flour

540

Whole Wheat (WW) flour

85

Whole Rye flour

75

Whole Spelt flour

100

Water (85-90ºF)

600

Levain

360

Salt

21

Total

1781

Method

  1. In a large bowl, mix the water and the flours to a shaggy mass. Be sure to leave no dry flour in the bowl.

  2. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 1-2 hours (autolyse).

  3. Sprinkle the salt over the dough and add the levain in 4-6 portions. Mix in with a spatula, spoon or your wet hands.

  4. Continue distributing the salt and levain evenly by squeezing the dough repeatedly between your thumb and fingers, alternating with stretching and folding the dough. (Hint: I find that doing this wearing a food service glove which I dip frequently in a bowl of water works very well. The dough doesn't stick to the glove as much as it does to my hand.)

  5. Transfer the dough to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover it.

  6. Ferment at 80ºF for 3-4 hours. Stretch and fold in the bowl at 30 and 60 minutes. Stretch and fold on a lightly floured board 50 and 100 minutes later. Note: I bulk ferment this dough in a Brød and Taylor Proofing Box. If you are fermenting at a cooler temperature, it will just take longer. Do additional stretch and folds hourly to redistribute metabolites and equalize dough temperature. Leave the dough alone for the last hour. The dough should increase in volume to about double and be pillowy.

  7. Divide the dough into two equal pieces. Pre-shape as rounds and cover with a dish towel. Let it rest for 10-30 minutes.

  8. Shape as boules or bâtards and place in floured bannetons. Place in food-safe plastic bags (or cover with a damp tea towel).

  9. Allow to proof at room temperature for 30-60 minutes, then refrigerate for 8-16 hours.

  10. Remove from refrigerator and let sit at room temperature for 1-2 hours, depending on degree of proofing.

  11. If baking on a stone, pre-heat the oven for an hour with the baking stone and your steaming apparatus in place. If baking in Dutch ovens (DO's), pre-heat the oven with the DO tops for at least 20 minutes. Note: If baking on a stone, I pre-heat the oven to 500ºF. If baking in DO's, I pre-heat to 475ºF.)

  12. If baking on a stone turn down the oven temperature to 460ºF, transfer loaves to a peel, steam the oven, score the loaves as desired and load them onto the stone. Remove the steaming apparatus after 15 minutes. Continue baking for another 30-40 minutes. If you have a convection oven, set it to 435ºF Convection Bake for the last part of the bake. The loaves are done when they are darkly colored, sound hollow when the bottoms are thumped and have an internal temperature of 205ºF.

  13. If baking in DO's, transfer the loaves into the DO bottoms. Score the loaves as desired. Using good hot pads or oven gloves, remove the DO tops from the oven and cover the bottoms. Transfer the DO's to the oven. After 30 minutes, remove the DO covers. Continue to bake the loaves for another 20 minutes.

  14. Remove the loaves from the oven and place them on a cooling rack. Cool completely before slicing.

Note: These times and temperatures assume 900-1200 g loaves. If using this dough for smaller loaves, use higher temperatures and shorter bake times. If baking larger loaves, use lower temperatures and longer bake times.

The loaf that had been retarded for 20 hours was tasted after completely cooling. The crust was crunchy. The crumb was tender. The flavor was complex, sweet and moderately sour. A very delicious bread.

 

The loaf that was retarded for an additional day seemed a bit over-proofed. It had a weaker gluten sheath and spread more when transferred to the peel. It had less oven spring and less bloom. The crust did brown well though. The texture of the crust and crumb were the same as the first loaf. The flavor was somewhat more sour but also less complex to my taste when first tasted. The next morning, as usual, the flavors had melded and improved.

 

Now, I would not conclude that a 40+ hour cold retardation is a bad idea in general. For this particular bread, it did not provide an improved result. Not bad bread, but the first loaf was better, at least to my palate.

Happy baking!

David

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