The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Retarding?

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Ricko's picture
Ricko

Retarding?

Alot seems to be said about retarding and how it improves the final bread taste. Since this is a technique that I know absolutely nothing about, I'll start with a couple simple questions.


Having my own dedicated fridge in the basement for my starters that I use, what is the best temperature to strive for through the cold adjustment setting control on the fridge in order to get the best retarding results?


Which is the preferred method, to mix and then retard the dough, or to go through the first rise at room temp, shape, and then retard? Thank you!

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

how long do you want to retard for


all yeast activity stops when the dough is at 32  degrees F thoughout.


remember the center takes time to get that cold


ether way will work but the shapped dough will get cold faster so you can hold it longer and then just proof and bake


you can retard the dough then sshape proof and bake


or rise at room temp and shape retard then take out proof and bake or extream retard the dough over night then shape and retard till your ready to proof and bake


in the shop we would mix the dough make (6 pound pieces) and retard over night


the next day would shape and then back in the redarder


take what was needed for the day and bake the quanity wanted


this way you could mix once a week and bake fresh every day or every other day

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

On a completely separate and unrelated note... it's "a lot".  "Alot" is not a word, even if you really like it a lot. :)


This message is brought to you by your friendly neighbourhood grammar nitpicker.

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

As for the question, you can search the forums for recommended temperature ranges (IIRC, it's somewhere in the 50F range, but I don't recall).  That said, I tend to prefer retarding after bulk fermentation but before shaping.  I find that if you retard a shaped loaf, you have to be *very* careful to protect the surface from drying out... something I've never managed to do effectively.

Ricko's picture
Ricko

Thanks everyone for the help. Fancypantalons, I'll work on the grammer!

Ricko's picture
Ricko

Fancypantalons, your point on "bulk fermentation" is well taken. I've read Daniel Leader's comments on retarding (page 32) in his "Local Breads" book, and how he does not advise retarding for home bakers using rye dough breads. Due bascially to the weaker gluten structure of rye dough being more sensitive to acid buildup that occurs in retarding. He did give a 12 hour limit on retarding of white-flour doughs for this very reason. Since his comments were directed towards the second rise, and we're speaking of the first, perhaps this issue doesn't apply? Have you encountered this problem? What is the maximum amount of time you allow for "bulk fermentation"?


Thank you for your consideration to my questions!

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Retard at 38 dF for 12 to 24 hours.


Wild-Yeast