The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My Breads are too Dry

dragon49's picture
dragon49

My Breads are too Dry

My friends are complaining that my breads are too dry.  I am using 3 tablespoons of olive oil for each 4 chup of flour and between 1 1/4 and 1 1/3 cups of water.


 


Will a different type of oil be better, or should I jsut add more oil?  Also, for more percentages of Whole Wheat, should I add more oil generally?


 


Thanks

crunchy's picture
crunchy

Dragon, what about adding more water? It seems that your recipe is about 30% hydration, which is pretty dry, even with the extra oil.

Wisecarver's picture
Wisecarver (not verified)

Make sure it feels right as you work it.
If it feels dry, if you add a lot of flour on the surface, it will be drier.


btw, what are you using for a surface to work the dough?
For those I'd suggest a large lightly oiled stainless bowl, or invest in silicone mats.
That way you will not need to add any additional flour once its mixed.

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

use a scale and target 64% hydration ratio - I use this with 80% whole wheat and 20% all purpose flour.  Bake at 450 for 10 min, than 350 for 35-40 until (use a probe themometer) internal temp is 198 degrees.  Bread will be moist and keep for 5 days or more!  Happy baking...

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

More water is needed...definitely.  You can even skip using any oil if you want to.

dragon49's picture
dragon49

Thanks for the replies,


I am a novice at Breadmaking.  I'm putting the ingredients into a breadpan and letting my breadmaker do all of the work.  The size of the pan limits the amount of water I can use.  I'll try making some smaller breads with a higher hydration ratio.


I'll let you know how it works out.


 

davec's picture
davec

I use four cups of flour in my breadmaker, too.  But I also use 1 1/2 cups of water.  For my whole wheat recipe, I use 3 TBS olive oil, as you do, plus 3 TBS honey.  With the whole wheat, I usually have to increase the water to at least 14 fl oz, to get the dough consistency right.


Ironically, if I use less water, I get a much denser, and therefore wetter, not drier, loaf.  It just doesn't rise right if the dough is too dry.


Dave

dragon49's picture
dragon49

I used this modified formula:


3 3/4 cups of flour


Between 1 1/3 and 1 1/2 cups of water.


 


I put the Bread in a Breadbag 5 minutes after removing it from the pan, while it was still steaming hot.  The condensation was trapped in the bag and probably added extra moisture to the bread.


I wonder if this last factor made a significant difference to the moisture factor.  I did this with my last 2 breads.  They were significantly wetter than breads that were left out 1 hour, beofre sealing them in Bread Bags.  I find it hard to believe that the small amounts of extra water and less flour made such a big difference. 


 


Thanks,


 


Later