The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello Everone from Virginia

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

Hello Everone from Virginia

Hello Everone at The Fresh Loaf!  I found this site searching for a light airy bread without a Bread Machine.  I have been trying myskills at baking bread. I have alot of free time on my hands and I thought this would be a great way to keep my self busy. With the price of food going up and up I,m trying to make things like bread at home instead of buying it. A loaf of bread at Walmart cost more then 2 dollars. I make my husband sandwichs for work and by midweek I am out of bread. Store bread does not taste good anymore to me not like when I was a kid.  I have made a great Challah bread from a newpaper clipping will post as soon as possible.  But I wanted to start with the basics so i read the first lesson on this site. It is simple but i have questions if anyone can help me the recipe calls for water is it warm or just regular temp do i active the yeast before i put all the ingredients or do i just put all the ingredients in the bowl any help would be totally helpful


Thanks


Loree

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

If you use instant (aka, "Quick Rise") yeast, and I *strongly* suggest you do, you don't have to activate it.  Just throw it in with the rest of your dry ingredients and you're good to go!


If, however, you've already got a stock of active dry yeast, the instructions for that stuff typically recommend activating it in water before adding it to the dough.  In that case, you want water that's around 75-80F.  Just throw the yeast and any sugar in the water, mix it up to dissolve the yeast, and let it stand for a few minutes while you get the dry ingredients together (typically flour and salt).   Then combine everything, and start building the dough.

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

Tthank you so much for responding. I actually have both yeast products. So i can just throw regular water with the Quick Rise also can i use Bread flour instead of the plain flour

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

Use whatever flour you like (well, except for pastry or cake flour :)!  I typically use good ol AP, but you can certainly use bread flour if you have it on hand.

Marni's picture
Marni

Instant yeast and quick rise are not the same thing.  At least not those I've used.  Both those need to go in the warm water first.  There are folks here who do not activate the regular yeast in water first and they have fine results, but I have never had it work well.  The water should be warm as posted above, hottemps. kill yeast and cold ones slow it down.


Instant yeast is the one that can go straight into the mix.  I also would recommend instant.


Using bread flour to make bread is fine, bread flour for other baked goods like cake or muffins will make them tough.  Bread flour has a higher protein content. You can use all purpose flour for your bread too.  I use King Arthur all purpose and get great results.


Have fun and Welome to The Fresh Loaf!


Marni

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

"Instant yeast and quick rise are not the same thing. At least not those I've used."


I think you're confusing "quick-rise" and "rapid rise" yeast.  "Quick-rise" is typically a synonym for "instant" yeast.  An excellent example is Fleischmann's Quick-Rise Yeast, which, on the label, contains "Instant Yeast" as part of the subtitle.  You can see the label here:


http://www.breadworldcanada.com/productline/loadhighres_qry.html


Rapid rise yeast, however, is very different, and it's generally poorly regarded.

Marni's picture
Marni

I only buy large 1-2lb. bags of instant or occasionally, active dry yeast.  ( The active only when I can't get instant and MUST bake!) I haven't seen an envelope in years.   I spoke (wrote) too soon. 


Marni

Bad Cook's picture
Bad Cook

I have not been able to find "instant" yeast around here, so I used "active dry" yeast because someone said it would work just fine, and it does.  I did dissolve it in water first, just because I figured it would disperse better in the mixture that way, but I didn't bother to use warm water or wait a few minutes.  What doesn't work (experience talking here) is "rapid rise" yeast.  :(

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

Instant Yeast is also called "Bread Machine Yeast". If your local grocery store is big enough to have one of those bulk bin sections, they may have instant yeast there. It would be a whole lot cheaper that way than buying a little set of envelopes or a jar. When you get home, transfer it to a glass jar and keep it in the fridge.

Bad Cook's picture
Bad Cook

Rainbowz, are you sure that bread machine yeast is actually instant yeast?  Because I haven't been able to find instant yeast around here, but I did find bread machine yeast.  (Keep in mind that I don't know everyone here yet, and don't get offended if you're, like, a master chef or something.)  :)


I've actually been using plain old active dry yeast in my No Knead Bread, and it has worked well, but I've wondered if the instant yeast would work better.

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

Thanks so much again for all the replys. I went ahead and through everything together its rising now I'll let everyone know how it turns out.  But i think adding warm water to the yeast before putting it in the flour is a better idea.  But i'm trying new ways and ideas. Thanks a Bunch my fellow Loafers

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/faqs/baking/yeast


Welcome to TFL. If you spend a little time exploring the site you will find lots of answers to your ?s. Feel free to ask away, lots of peeps here who will help you!


Betty

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

thanks for the welcome