The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

2 loaves made, I'm on my way ...

3baddogs's picture
3baddogs

2 loaves made, I'm on my way ...

Hi, I just made two loaves of what was called a 'rustic country loaf' in the cookbook I got it from (Mediterranean Lite).  Both were delicious (I'm a bit biased and have also been eating Oroweat Oat Bran for the last 9 years, since I moved to a very rural part of the US, sooo ... they were better than that!).  I have a question and can't find an answer anywhere.  This cookbook told me to rise the bread when I'm shaping it in a benetton, which I don't have, of course, but I did have an oblong wicker basket, about 9x6", so I just lined that with a flour infested towel and it did nicely and got a nice shape.  The first time I did it (lucky break) the bread transferred to the stone very well.  But the dough doesn't rise as high as the top of the basket, and the second time I did it the 'plopping' onto the stone deflated and deformed it a bit.  Is there some fancy way of getting the bread out of the basket, over that hot stone without just taking your chances with the flip?


Thanks for anyone else's technique (it's got to be better than mine!)

fatdog's picture
fatdog

You need to invert the dough onto a peel or other flat surface dusted with corn meal  and then transfer to the stone.  Just make sure the dough will not stick to the peel.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

You can also put a piece of parchment on your peel before flipping your dough onto it...


You made me laugh when you said your towel was flour "infested"instead of dusted...Im not making fun or anything near that...I just thought it was real cute...Happy Holidays!


Sylvia

3baddogs's picture
3baddogs

Thanks, FatDog, and SylviaH and hello!  So, tell me, Sylvia, will the parchment paper go up in a rush of flames if I start the dough at 500, or will it be ok?  It would make for quite a nicely browned crust if it did, eh?  And I was dead serious about the 'flour infested towel'.  The direction said to form it in a benetton with a flour dusted towel.  I thought to myself, "you're kidding me right?  You want me to put this incredibly sticky dough against a tea towel?  Really??"  So I was very paranoid about it sticking to the towel, witness my floury country loaf.



 


 


You probably think it's odd that I would photograph my very first loaf of bread, but I'm a knitter and we take pictures of everything we touch.  :-)  (I forgot to slash it, can you tell??)

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

tip A lot of the extra flour can be removed be brushing it away with a dry soft brush

3baddogs's picture
3baddogs

Oh, that's a good idea!  It started to fall off when I sliced it and then I would kind of tap each piece ... truthfully I was enchanted that it had flour on it, almost like REAL bread, but I will admit that I achieved waaay too much of a good thing there.  :-)

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Your parchment will be fine...it's made for use in a hot oven...it'll brown some and if you want you can remove it after the bread bakes some but really not necessary....if you've never used parchment...you'll wonder how you got along without it!!  Your first loaf and you did a wonderful job!


Sylvia

GinkgoGal's picture
GinkgoGal

You must be on Ravelry then.  If not you definitely need to check it out.


And really, you will fall in love with using parchment.

3baddogs's picture
3baddogs

Indeed I am, with the same username, and I just checked out your projects.  LOVE your peapod, that's sooo adorable.  And I moved here from Seattle 9 years ago to look after my aging father.  doo-doo-doo-doo  (that's the twilight theme music, in case you didn't recognize it).  I'll try and locate some parchment paper.  I'll probably have to buy it ONLINE (really, really rural ... I mean it). 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Great looking loaf!


Tip: Just make sure it's baking parchment otherwise it will stick. Once your towel is "infested" let it dry, fold it and store in a bag to keep the infestated towel flour contained.  You don't have to keep washing it between uses just a good shake out now and then and dusting with flour before use.  (If the dough is really sticky, super sticky, try adding a little non-glutinous rice flour to the mixture on the towel.  One part rice to four parts other.  If you can't get ready made rice flour, make your own in a blender or grinder.  It don't take much.)


I place the parchment on the rising loaf, place my hand over the parchment and gently invert the loaf onto my hand.  (Remove any plastic on the dough, the dough doesn't have to rise above the basket. I gently poke the dough with a finger to test for readiness.)  Then lay it down on something flat that won't melt when it touches the hot oven insides.  I use a stiff piece of cardboard for a peel.  Then slide it into the oven on a preheated cookie sheet (using a slight jerking motion) or lay into roasting pan and cover for the first 15 minutes.  After uncovering, reduce heat and let it brown and finish baking.  



..."odd that I would photograph my very first loaf of bread"....



Gosh, not at all!  Heavens!  Most of us have more pictures of bread than relatives!  Just keep on baking and making photos!  (breadporn)


Mini Oven

3baddogs's picture
3baddogs

Thanks, Mini Oven.  That's a great tip about the towel, I made a big old cloud of flour out in the back yard shaking that thing out just trying to get it to a state where I could put it in with the other dirty clothes.


My dough was not as wet as some of y'alls probably is because this was the basic four ingredient (plus biga ... but that's really the same ingredients, I guess) loaf from lesson one on this site.  I just thought it was so fascinating that it actually turned into bread that I went searching for a website and stumbled across this one.  It's soo fabulous!  I went cruising through the Thanksgiving photos and printed off about six recipes and made pumpkin pie cookies last night (delicious!!).  The three bad dogs and my 4 y.o. could NOT get enough of them.


The 4 y.o. got a slice of the bread, hot out of the oven with butter when I first made it and looked at it rather dubiously and then ran off to jump up and down in front of spongebob whilst nibbling.  When he tasted it he stopped jumping and said, "MOM, this is SO GOOD.  IT's waaayyy better than pop-tarts."  High praise, indeed, and good motivation to learn more about bread.  :-)  Thanks for your tips.  I actually did ask about a bread peel when I was buying my cooking stone (pizza round, that's all they had) but it was at wal-mart and the poor lady said, "huh?" which was kind of what I expected.  Cardboard I have, though.  :-)

gaaarp's picture
gaaarp

Before I got a peel, I used the back of a pizza pan.  It is the right size (big enough for the bread, but smaller and easier to handle than a cookie sheet).  Just dust it with flour or cornmeal, or use parchment paper, and slide your dough from it to your stone.

Soundman's picture
Soundman

Welcome to TFL, 3baddogs! Is that name your description of your pets?


Using a peel as others suggest is a good idea. To that I add a variation. I have found that when the dough is below the top of the basket, I can make a really gentle transfer this way:


Take a piece of baking parchment paper in your left hand, if you're right-handed (or switch the instructions if you're a southpaw); hold the wicker in your right hand and gently lay the parchment evenly spaced over the basket; gently (again) push your left hand into the basket, with the parchment leading the way, just until you feel the dough; now invert the basket and the dough will be sitting in your hand on the parchment. Place the parchment, dough in place, on your peel. Never a hard plop when I use this technique.


Soundman (David)