The Fresh Loaf

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How to make bread with very soft crust like in bakeries?

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gerop's picture
gerop

How to make bread with very soft crust like in bakeries?

Hi All,

I've recently started baking my own bread :) I'm still very new to this and so far have been using very simple/basic recipes. I've been trying to get my bread to turn out with really soft soft crust (like in bakeries or store brought bread). How do I do this pls? My mom loves those types of bread.

I've tried spreading some milk on the crust before baking, rubbing with butter after baking.. all these help, but i still can't get that degree of crust softness that you get from bakeries. The inside is lovely and soft though.

My recipe - 3 cups flour, 1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon yeast, 2 teaspoons sugar, 1 tablespoon honey, 2 tablespoons butter, 1/2 teaspoons salt.

any advise please?

 

Thanks

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

i posted a roll dough that would give you what you want

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9536/double-knot-roll

you could also change the butter in your formula for shortening for a softer crust

gerop's picture
gerop

Thanks so much ! :) I'll be trying it out this weekend.

Actually I like my breads with a nice crispy crust, but my mom likes it soft :) So I have to learn how to make both types

dougal's picture
dougal

When you take the loaf out of the oven, wrap it in a (clean) damp (wet but not dripping) dishtowel instead of letting it air cool on a wire rack. Unwrap it when its cool enough to handle comfortably.

And bake for a thin (not thick) crust.

If you want a flat-topped loaf (for sandwiches, for example) then you'll probably need to invest in a "Pullman Loaf Tin", which has a slide-on flat lid.  

ovguide's picture
ovguide

Thank you for help.

JIP's picture
JIP

To me the soft crust in bakery and suoermarket bread is the problem with it not something to strive for but I guess to each his own.  As far as I now the soft crust you are looking for can be accomplished with more fat in your dough.  I make a so called "Cuban bread" that is the softest bread I make and it has shortening in the dough.

verminiusrex's picture
verminiusrex

Bag it in plastic after the loaf cools, the moisture inside the dough equalizes and takes the crunch out of the crust.  I'm also a fan of high gluten flour when I bake, makes for a fluffier loaf that doesn't dry out as fast.  You can get the same results by adding vital wheat gluten when making the dough. 

holds99's picture
holds99

Find a recipe for enriched dough with eggs and butter. They're usually soft loaves with nice crumb/interior texture and good taste...and make great toast.

Howard

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I agree about the eggs & butter. Milk helps too.


--Pamela

dougal's picture
dougal

Commercially, lots of additives are used to make and keep the bread soft. Lecithin is probably the least offensive of them. One natural source of lecithin is actually egg ...

mrgmanners's picture
mrgmanners

It might be worth noting that it may not be posible to achieve the kind of crust you are wanting to because of your oven. I work in a wholesaler where we bake fresh bread daily. The type of ovens we use are Steam Oven. They inject controlled blasts of steam into the oven to give you the type of crust you require, ie, the soft whispy crust you find on supermarket baps.

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Yes, dairy products help keeping crust and crumb soft to a certain extent.  My trick to keep the crust soft is to keep baking time short and temperature low.  When I make rolls I don't use temperature higher than 375F and for 12 min (max 14).  When I do sandwich loaves I bake them at 350F for no more than 50 minutes (this include whole wheat bread) as long as the internal temperature reaches 190F.  I also have luck with using water roux starter.  I believe the extra water absorbed makes a difference in the texture of both crumb and crust.  Sourdough seems to have the same effec on my breads. 



Just Loafin's picture
Just Loafin

I agree that bagging it fairly soon will moisturize the crust. In addition, when your crust reaches a desired browning (usually a very light golden color), tent the top with foil while the insides finish baking. The foil will prevent further browning -and- trap some of the escaping moisture, keeping the crust further moisturized.


- Keith

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Bagging it fairly soon will promote moisture, but it also will promote mold growth, so you have to eat it up faster. You can't always see the mold when it starts growing either because some of the spores are white (maybe white before green--not sure).


--Pamela

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I posted this before, but here it is again.


http://www.baking911.com/bread/101_ingredients_doughenhancers.htm


--Pamela

gerop's picture
gerop

Hi All,


 


Thanks so much for all the suggestions. :) it's really helpful.


Now my bread crusts are much softer .


 


 

TheIrishBaker's picture
TheIrishBaker

I had previously added Oil and used the "tea towel" trick but last night tried adding an egg - it made a big difference for me, much softer but the resulting bread (Irish Soda bread in my case) was a bit crumbly but nonetheless delicious.


http://irishbaker.blogspot.com/2010/01/softer-crust-part-ii.html


 


 

killpineapple's picture
killpineapple

i am such a fan of chewy crusts but my mom has very weak teeth and cant tear into bread so she rarely eats any bread i make for her.  store-bought rolls and bread with thin, soft crusts are easy for her to chew so i would love to emulate those as best as i can.  i cant do much for her but would love to bake some nommy breads for her for christmas. 

do these methods work for most bread recipes or preparation techniques?  poolish?  wet/stiff doughs?