The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

2-Stage Detmolder technique

  • Pin It
jimhaas3's picture
jimhaas3

2-Stage Detmolder technique

AgroEast Baking & Milling Co. in Kiev Ukraine is DESPERATELY looking for a description of the 2-Stage Detmolder process for its bakery in Kiev, Ukraine. The normal 3-State Detmolder will not fit into the logistics and production schedule; we need 8-10 hours for the final build before mixing the batch ingredients.

Anyone out there familiar with the 2-State Detmolder? can you share it with us...?

Cheers

suave's picture
suave

First build in 2-phase method is at least 15 hours, second - around 3 hours, so that won't help your schedule much.  If you don't mind me asking what's wrong with traditional soviet technologies?  They have 2 and 3-stage procedures with 8-12 h final builds, and I'm sure a qualified baker from one of the former state bakeries would know all about them.

Mike

jimhaas3's picture
jimhaas3

So far my acquaintances and colleagues from former "state" bakeries here are not very familiar with variations to the 3-Stage Detmolder; Nothing wrong with tradional soviet technologies per say, but my own queries in this regard reveal that a build as complicated as Detmolder is simply not used; breads are much more limited in variety; mostly straight-doughs, and produced in huge quantities; and thankfully delivered to bread stores and sold fresh (same-day). However they are basically all yeast-leavened.

Thanks for your reply.

Jim Haas, Kyiv Ukraine

suave's picture
suave

Oh.  That doesn't sound too good.  Straight doughs - what the world is coming to?  Traditionally, as far as I know from the books - I've never been inside one of those bakeries, most yeasted white breads almost in any case required a sponge.   Rye breads were developed by one stage procedure, pretty similar if not identical to Berliner shortsour, with 3-4 hour final build, and it works pretty damn good.   There're also as I said more complicated procedures involving specialty starters or mashes, and they are as complicated and as well researched as detmolders, but from what I've read they are indeed falling out of use.  In any event Kiev is a big city - there's got to be a college that teaches or used to teach  this stuff, it can't be all lost completely.  If all that sounds excessive, order a copy of Hamelman's "Bread".  It has a good variety of recipes which I think will match local palates well, and the book is written with small bakery operator in mind.

Mike