The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Volkornbrot or Volkorn-brick?

karladiane's picture
karladiane

Volkornbrot or Volkorn-brick?

A question on Volkornbrot for anyone who can provide some insight.

I've taken the "rye-bread" challenge, and have started attempting some rye loaves. I made "Vokornbrot" from Daniel Leader's "Local Breads", and although it is absolutely delicious, I'm not quite sure if I did it "right". I don't have any good frame of reference (it's been an awfully long time since I've visited Germany - too many years to admit).

Can anyone out there give me a good description of what the texture is supposed to be like? Mine is quite dense, and very, very moist. It did not rise very much at all, and I was very afraid of letting it proof too long. But the taste is rich and sweet - I just wonder if it shouldn't have a little bit more of a lighter crumb.

By the way, I bought my rye berries from Bluebird Grain Farms. I also bought some wonderful Emmer wheat from them. Even though the shipping is a bad carbon footprint, I really wanted to support a small, family, organic farm. Visit their lovely website if you have the time.

http://www.bluebirdgrainfarms.com/

Peace & love from Atlanta,

KP

 

 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== Can anyone out there give me a good description of what the texture is supposed to be like? Mine is quite dense, and very, very moist. It did not rise very much at all, and I was very afraid of letting it proof too long. But the taste is rich and sweet - I just wonder if it shouldn't have a little bit more of a lighter crumb. ===

 That sounds about right.  I made something similar (modified version of Hamelman's 90% rye) last week for our German exchange student (from the Hamburg area) and he was quite happy with it.

sPh

goetter's picture
goetter

A Vollkornbrot has a caky texture.  It's indeed very dense, but should be well short of brick, though the exterior can get quite firm.  The more sunflower/flax/pumpkin seeds you add to your dough, the heavier it will get.  It won't rise that much in the oven, but it absolutely will rise while proofing.  Your worry with overproofing is more one of letting that weak rye dough deflate completely than anything else.  Try making it with a slightly wetter dough next time.

Thanks for supporting Bluebird.  They're friends and neighbors of mine.  That emmer makes a wonderful tabbuleh.

From Mazama (but born in Atlanta),

Ben