The Fresh Loaf

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Pain de Beaucaire

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holds99's picture
holds99

Pain de Beaucaire

After a number of attempts and a good bit of reseach I think I am close to making a decent Pain de Beaucaire.  It's a challenge that's ranks right up there with the baguette.  This was my third attempt.  It's a really good loaf of bread and has very good flavor.  I will continue to experiment with this dough and the special technique required for cutting and shaping and also requires the use of bran flakes sandwiched between the two layers of dough, placed one on top of the other, in order to produce the open effect seen in the photo below, where the loaf appears to be split.  The split is part of the character of the loaf.  I have also included a little history of this bread, which was the predecessor to the baguette.

Howard

Pain de BeaucairePain de Beaucaire

Description from: Advanced Bread and Pastry by Michel Suas. “Named after Beaucaire, a region in Southeastern France, the Pain de Beaucaire is one of the first breads to be made “free form”, or not formally shaped.  The bread is produced by placing two (2) layers of dough on top of each other and then cutting with a Recle a Beaucaire, strips of dough that are baked side by side, giving this bread its unique appearance.  Pain de Beaucaire was very popular until people started to prefer the lighter and crunchier baguette.  However, this authentic regional bread is currently enjoying resurgence as a new generation discovers its many appealing characteristics.”Note: Michel Suas gives no details on mixing or shaping Pain de Beaucaire and no photographs.

The following description is taken from the website: http://les7episbio.free.fr/presentation.en.php “Pain de Beaucaire: It’s a sourdough bread which requires a very particular shaping and which gives him [it] a very alveolus [a little cavity, pit or cell, as a cell of a honeycomb] crumb.  The pain de Beaucaire has been transmitted for the XV century whereas the town of Beaucaire was the site of the second fair of Europe.”  Note: this quoted description is taken verbatim from the website.  Bracketed words were added for clarity. 

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

This really looks appetizing.  This would not last long around my house.  Hope you make more of these!

Sylvia

holds99's picture
holds99

Appreciate your kind words. 

Howard

fredsambo's picture
fredsambo

I am not a big fan of making free form breads, but I know a good one when I see it and love to eat them.  :-) 

holds99's picture
holds99

fredsambo,

I really enjoy making a variety of breads, using a variety of techniques.  This bread was...and continues to be a challenge. 

Howard

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

It looks just like the one in the link. I can't quite picture the technique. It almost looks like you had a long baguette shape, sliced the middle almost through, then folded one half over the other with the bran flakes sandwiched inbetween and turned it on it's side? In any case, I like it! The pain a la planche looks cool too.

Betty

holds99's picture
holds99

Betty,

Thanks.  You have the idea.  After the bulk fermentation you press it down and shape it into a rectangle (3/4 inch thick) and cut it down the middle, lengthwise.  Then paint the dough (2 seperate loaves), and side edges (but not the outer edges that will be the top of the loaf, with water, apply the bran to the painted area (avoiding the side edges, fold one side of each loaf onto itself for the final fermentation in a couche.  After final proof the open side goes up and you slide it onto the stone with a short blast of steam for the baking cycle.

Howard

proth5's picture
proth5

I have many fond memories of Beaucaire (the town is a bit "gritty" in my opinion, but they have a wonderful raptor demonstration called the "Aigles de Beaucaire" in the ruins of a castle) but had never heard any mention of a special bread.

Perhaps - as with so many things - when you live in Beaucaire it's just bread an no one makes a big deal about it.

Next time I'm there, I must seek it out.

Great looking bread - as always!

Pat

holds99's picture
holds99

Thanks for your kind words.  According to the write-up this bread originated in the 15th century in Beaucaire.  Lots of things change in 500 years :>)  The baguette eclipsed this bread.  I have a theory that some enterprising baker in Beaucaire decided it was easier to just shape it into one loaf, score it and call it a baguette...au revoir Pain de Beaucaire. Regardless, it's a great tasting bread, truly rustic...and a fun challenge.  I lived in France for a while but never made it to Beaucaire.  I'll take your word for the grittiness of the town.  Actually, I like grittiness it lends character.

Hope your hands and arms have recovered from baking the naan in your tandoor.  What are you baking these days? 

Howard

proth5's picture
proth5

Interesting. Well, I will need to do some research next year (hopefully) if the Tarasque does not get me first...

Fall weather has come to the Mile High City and I'm back to baking indoors.  I have a certain appreciation for turning a knob and getting heat after working with the tandoor.  My last naan was a few weeks back and the arms are recovered.

This is the first year in a long time that I haven't spent my week in the general area of the Luberon. I was in Paris in April for the Coupe du Monde (etc) and it just seemed like too much to go twice in a year (I travel for a living so I have lots of frequent flier miles to burn) especially at the current exchange rate.

These days in addition to the baguettes (can never practice too much) and home ground whole wheat, I am working on Detmolder Rye bread.  I have a neighbor who wants 100% rye, but I feel that my rye dough handling skills are not yet ready for that.  High percentage rye is a different world as far as I am concerned.

In the near future I hope to be confident enough with rye to use home milled rye.  Because I need something else to do :>)

Happy Baking!

Pat

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Howard, I also found the description of shaping pain de Beaucaire in Advanced Bread and Pastry to be a bit cryptic.  A phone call to one of the contributing authors of the book cleared up a lot for me.  Details can be found here: 

http://www.breadcetera.com/?p=121

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

holds99's picture
holds99

That's a beautiful loaf Pain de Beaucaire you made and great information that you were able to obtain from one of the contributing editors of Advanced Bread and Pastry.  It should be extremely helpful to anyone making this bread.

Greatly appreciate you posting the recipe/formula for those who do not have Michel Suas' book. 

Howard

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Howard, thanks for your compliments and your graciousness in encouraging me to post to this thread.  Pain de Beaucaire shaping confusion aside, I've found Advanced Bread and Pastry to be an invaluable resource and encourage those looking to expand their bread baking knowledge and technique to add the book to their collection. 

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

holds99's picture
holds99

I believe Suas' "Advance Bread and Pastry" is a major contribution to the baking craft and a really great book.  I liken it to a sort of gastronomique for bakers. 

Howard

proth5's picture
proth5

Ah!  The great ABand P debate!  I am still waiting for my copy to arrive, but am sure to have an opinion when I finally get the chance to dig into it.

Until then...

Happy Baking!

Pat

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

With your talent at the kitchen counter, you should write a bread & pastry book yourself!

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Hans, that is exactly what I'm hoping my blog will become... a type of interactive on-line bread and pastry 'book' that is readily accessible to the home baker.  It may not read like a traditional book, but I'm hoping that bread bakers everywhere will come to view it as a valuable resource.  A lofty goal, to be sure, but one worth aiming for!  

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

dougal's picture
dougal

holds99 wrote:
Suas wrote:
The bread is produced by placing two (2) layers of dough on top of each other and then cutting with a Recle a Beaucaire, strips of dough that are baked side by side, giving this bread its unique appearance.
Note: Michel Suas gives no details on mixing or shaping Pain de Beaucaire and no photographs.

Quote:
In Beaucaire, bread is traditionally shaped through a folding process that is unique to the area.
http://www.breadcetera.com/?p=121

paddyscake wrote:
I can't quite picture the technique.

'SteveB wrote:
Howard, I also found the description of shaping pain de Beaucaire in Advanced Bread and Pastry to be a bit cryptic. A phone call to one of the contributing authors of the book cleared up a lot for me.

SteveB wrote:
Pain de Beaucaire shaping confusion aside, I've found Advanced Bread and Pastry to be an invaluable resource and encourage those looking to expand their bread baking knowledge and technique to add the book to their collection.

 

Ummm. As Steve said on his blog, the shaping is what this loaf is all about.

On which Suas, in print, fails miserably.

If you don't have the phone numbers for the instructors at SFBI, and you are just going by the printed book - then, as this episode demonstrates, judged as a tutorial book, its actually a pretty mediocre one.

I don't think the book stands well if it is detatched from the personal instruction at the school which would naturally "fill in the blanks".

And there are these blanks.

My favourite is the instruction of how to shape a bagel -- "Shape: Bagel" -- that's it in its entirety! (Page 273)

And there is no website providing corrections and important details garbled or missed out entirely. For shame!

 

Please compare the description and photos of Pain de Beaucaire in Bertinet's "Dough" (Pages 60-61), with Suas's (page 220 to 221, text only).

Bertinet explains it, Suas really doesn't. "Strips of dough that are baked side by side" -- really?

 

For those that still haven't worked out the shaping, I offer my own (no pictures) description:

You make a sort of horizontal, long flat tube of dough. Then, using a serrated knife, slice a couple of inches off the end of the tube, and you get a ring. That ring, laid over so that hole in the middle then points straight up, will give you one loaf after it has proofed. The effect is of a ring doughnut squashed in from the sides, so that the hole becomes a mere crack. You get several slices, and so get several loaves, from your tube.

To make that long flat tube, stretch out your dough into a single rectangle. (If you've made less than a kilo of dough, have the long sides running away from you - so you have a tube of the right cross-section, just short! For commercial quantities, the long edge would go side to side.)

You are going to fold it over (pretty much in half) towards yourself to make the tube. But first you want to stop it sticking together everywhere (to keep the middle of the tube open).

So flour the middle (Bertinet suggests wholemeal or maize flour, Suas uses Bran) to prevent the two layers sticking together. But you want to wet the near edge to cement the layers together at the outside only - thus forming the tube. The water and gentle crimping join the dough together. After proofing, that seam should be barely visible. (If you want to make a rolled-over seam, that's even better, but the important thing is to flour the middle to prevent the tube closing entirely.)

 

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Dougal, if you haven't already done so, might I suggest returning your copy of Advanced Bread and Pastry to where it was purchased and getting either a store credit or your money back.  No sense owning a book which you find of little value.    

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

dougal's picture
dougal

Even if Amazon UK would return my £30 (which they won't), I'd still feel it was appropriate to counter the wholly unjustified 'plugging' that this book is getting.

The SFBI courses may be excellent.

But on its own, this book isn't.

However some people, many (maybe mostly) with some sort of connection to SFBI, are lavish with their praise for it.

There seems to be no connection between their comments and the book in front of me!

I have no connection whatsoever to SFBI and have been frankly disappointed with the book.

Not at all because of it being about 'working' rather than 'hobby' baking.

But I'm disappointed because of its errors, its poor explanations, and its enthusiasm for what another poster on another thread called "cheating".

And I'm disappointed that the authors don't seem to be concerned enough to post a list of corrections. Maybe it would be just too long.

 

Its quite possible that a second edition with corrections would be good. But as it stands, this edition is far short of excellent.

 

Incidentally Steve, I notice that your blog's Beaucaire video leaves out the Bran that ABAP specifies in the method, at step 3 - even though its not mentioned in the formula/list of ingredients - surprise!

By the way, this highlights another spelling mistake in the book that I honestly hadn't noticed before typing this - the book says "course bran" at step 3 - of course, it should be coarse bran. The book is just FULL of this carelessness. I find it quite shocking in a textbook.

Anyway, was there any particular reason for leaving out the (coarse) Bran that Suas includes in his written method?

 

Your blog lists Bertinet's "Dough" as 'recommended reading'. So I presume you have a copy.

Don't you think Bertinet's explanation and photo of Beaucaire are very much clearer than Suas's text that you yourself called "cryptic"?

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Hi Dougal,

From the outset, I'd like to state that I have no connection or affiliation whatsoever with the SFBI (and neither does Howard, to the best of my understanding), nor have I ever taken any classes there. 

Different people look for different things in a book.  Differing opinions are what make the world go 'round.  One person's "unjustified plugging" is another's heartfelt praise.  I'm sure you'll agree that every individual should have his/her opinion treated respectfully, whether one agrees with it or not.

That being said, I think highly of Advanced Bread and Pastry because there were many things that I learned from reading it that I didn't know before.  That is what I happen to look for in a book of this type.  Although I try to be careful about such matters, minor usage errors (such as the word "course" being incorrectly used for the word "coarse"), while regretable, don't detract from the overall usefulness of the book to me.

Regarding my omission of bran in the making of my pain de Beaucaire, I was quite aware that bran is used by some, but not all, of the bakers of this bread.  I'm not a real fan of bran, particularly as an outside coating to my bread, so I left it out.

Yes, I do own a copy of Bertinet's "Dough".  I bought it when it first came out.  It's been such a long time since I've read it that I had forgotten that Bertinet describes shaping a bread in the Beaucaire fashion.  While I think Bertinet wrote a fine book on bread baking, it appears to me as if it was written for the beginning baker and I did not get as much out of it as I did from Advanced Bread and Pastry.  Both books are quite suited to the audience to which they were written.

Howard, I apologize for taking your blog post in a direction which I am sure you had not intended.  With your and Dougal's understanding, this will be the last I will post here on this topic.    

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

dougal's picture
dougal

Steve, of course I accept that others have differing opinions. 

And that these discussions are in part for sharing, and testing, different opinions.  

I hope you'll note that I've tried to give specific examples of what I think is wrong with the book - to show justification for my opinions.

Perhaps in another thread you'll give some specifics of the gems ("many things that I learned from reading it that I didn't know before") that you have found buried within its 250 bread pages. I look forward to learning of ABAP's specific merits, and what you learned from Suas (about bread) that you didn't learn from Hamelman, Calvel, Bertinet and Reinhart - to list just those shown on your blog as "recommended reading". What specific tips/revelations/explanations are in ABAP and not in the others?

I really sincerely do want to know, even if it has to wait for another time!

 

 

I'm happy to return the focus to this specific "cryptic" Suas recipe

Steve, let me first congratulate you on your dough-handling skills which, I'm sure, far outdo my own. 

SteveB wrote:
Regarding my omission of bran in the making of my pain de Beaucaire, I was quite aware that bran is used by some, but not all, of the bakers of this bread.  I'm not a real fan of bran, particularly as an outside coating to my bread, so I left it out.

I wondered about this as being an unremarked departure from the Suas (plus telephone) instructions that I'd understood you to be following.

 

HOWEVER, both Suas and Bertinet are putting 'stuff' (Bran, Maize flour or Wholegrain wheat flour) inside (not outside) the "Beaucaire sandwich", seemingly to reduce/control the bonding between the layers - which control would seem integral to this shaping style. 

If you personally so dislike Suas's recipe (with bran), perhaps you might try Bertinet's dry flours in future?  

 

 

holds99's picture
holds99

There’s certainly no apology necessary as far as I am concerned.   I firmly believe differences of opinion are inevitable on a site like TFL and exchanges of opinions are healthy so long as issues are discussed and debated respectfully. 

If I may digress for a moment, years ago I remember reading the book “Vantage Point” by Lyndon Baines Johnson.  The book was Johnson’s autobiography.  Having served in the U.S. Infantry during the first few years of President Johnson’s elected term as president, suffice it to say, as I was reading his account of his presidency, I didn’t quite see it the way he recounted it.  It was a matter of perspective.  He was describing it from his “vantage point” as commander in chief and it just didn’t match my perspective based on my experiences.   I’m sure if the opportunity had ever presented itself I could have sat with him on the banks of the Pedernales River, at his ranch in Texas, and argued with him until hell froze over and it wouldn’t have mattered one iota to him.  He had his perspective and I had mine… we experienced the same time period from different “vantage points”.

Anyway, back to the subject.  I really like Mr. Suas’ book Advanced Bread and Pastry.  Is it a perfect book? No.  However, I do believe it’s a very good book.  I also believe any book that serves to enlighten and educate on a given subject is worthwhile.  Some of the flaws can and should be overlooked.  As an example, Rose Levy’s terrific book “The Bread Bible” has numerous errors but is still, in my opinion, an excellent book.  I have learned a great deal from her book and have found ways to work around the errors and omissions.  Rightly or wrongly, I subscribe to the rule that if you get a reasonable number of good ideas and recipes/formulas from a cookbook or baking book, ideas and information that advance your knowledge and skill level, the benefits are worth the cost of the book. 

I really like Advanced Bread and Pastry very much and sincerely hope that in future editions and publications Mr. Suas and his staff will fine tune and enhance some of his formulas and write-ups with more descriptive instructions, along with more photos and diagrams to help home bakers and students better understand the details.  As the old saying goes: “The devil is in the details”.  Advanced Bread and Pastry has tremendous potential as a major source of information on the many aspects of baking at both the professional and home baking level.

Hang in there, keep the faith and keep on baking and posting.  Now, I’m going to figure out how to make a pain a la planche.  If you (or anyone else out there) has had any experience with this bread I would greatly appreciate your input. 

Howard

holds99's picture
holds99

FWIW.  My personal belief is the book, perhaps in a succeeding edition/publication, should be divided into 2 volumes.  Volume I: Bread Baking (or whatever Mr. Suas chooses to title it) and Volume II: Patisserie/Pastry.  Mr. Suas should seriously consider providing, as Dougal suggested, thorough instructions and photos to make the book more "user friendly" and appealing to a larger group of bakers including proficient home bakers with no professional experience.  One thing that would help immensely is to use grams as his unit of measure for his"Test" batches, which are typically 2 lbs. of dough.  I'm sure that a professonal baker, using experience, could divine some of techniques and procedures and understand intuitively what Mr. Suas is attempting to convey.  Having said that, I still like the book very much and have had success with the formulas that I have tried, albeit with some fairly rigorous research on some of breads.

Howard

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

for my Pierre Nury pizzas folding the flattened out dough first in half, pinching the seam, and then folding again and sealing.  I cut it with a guitar string.  Set the cut on edge and let it fall open.

I can certainly picture this on a baker's scale with 20kg of dough being folded and many loaves cut off, one at a time.     

Inspiration came from THIS THREAD.

Mini O

holds99's picture
holds99

Thanks Mini,

Charlene and I struggled with trying to finally figure out how to get the nice partially open loaf without it completely flattening out and finally did pretty much what you did.  Didn't have any extra guitar strings :>) so I used a very large chefs knife that's an old kitchen friend.

Congrats!

Howard

proth5's picture
proth5

Oh bother - I need to read all the links before I post.  The link below was cited by the thread cited by Mini O.  - Sorry to add to an already long blog entry, but for what it's worth...

Well, not to get this back to Pain de Beaucaire, but I had some time to some internet searching and found this little link:

http://webfoodpros.com/discus/messages/241/309.html?965600881

Once again, not exactly spelling everything out, but the recipe comes from an MOF.

It seems that the letter fold (or the secret "special folding") is not the fold that we give the thing during proofing, but an integral part of the shaping - sort of what SteveB described, but not exactly - to give it a sort of croissant like make up. I'm not sure, but I think that subtlety has been missed.

Also seems like there is a "to bran or not to bran" controversy, as our MOF does not seem to mention bran.

When will that ABAP book arrive?  Now I'll have to bake a couple loaves myself...

Deary dear, so little bread, so much time. (Wait! Strike that - Reverse it!)

Happy Baking!

Pat

dougal's picture
dougal

Sorry but I don't get the folding/croissant idea.

If you had something to keep the laminations apart (butter, bran, chopped herbs, whatever to keep the folds apart and demonstrate them), you are - with the instructions linked - only going to get TWO lines in each half of the sandwich. So FIVE lines total in the final loaf. Which is short of millefeuille by a factor of 200x.

I think the original description was of a 'conventional' (to us, now) 'stretch & fold' and the layering millefeuille/croissant reference was just to the single central part-joined seam.

 

Does the specific use of bran come from anywhere other than SFBI/ABAP ???  

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

I saw a French blog mentioning pain facon beaucaire recently, with a picture that reminded me of the pain de beaucaire shaping/cutting technique that SteveB uses in his video clip. However, the final pain facon beaucaires looked more like rolls than loaves. So, facon = rolls? As you can see, my French is non-existent. Sorry, but I can't seem to find that blog now, so I don't have any links to share... Oh, and is the Bertinet recipe for these facons or for the pain de beaucaire, as in ABAP?

The other recipes I've seen for pain de beaucaire call for either wholewheat or cornmeal sprinkled between the layers. No mention of brans, as far as I know.

proth5's picture
proth5

I can only guess what was meant, but it made some sense to me.  When you make a croissant you do a series of folds to cover thin layers of butter.  Apparently you do one of these folds with perhaps (remember I'm guessing) water or slurry standing in for the butter as part of the shaping of the bread (read the instructions closely - although water is not mentioned per se it does enter the discussion but the letter fold really appears to be part of the shaping.)  Then you do the cutting and stacking and the proofing and baking on the side. 

No, not a thousand layers (and are there really a thousand layers in a croissant - I suppose this can be calculated) but an additional couple of layers and additional moisture would have to have an effect.  Just adding three distinct layers to the dough - which is then cut and stacked, etc - would seem likely to add to the open quality of the crumb, would it not?  If nothing else, it is a good method for creating the rectangle that is cut, etc.  Similar to all the folding and rolling we do with baguettes.  Why not just cut off a chunk of dough and roll it?  Because the folding adds to the integrity of the shape and adds layers that will enhance our cherished open crumb.  Something to think about.

Again, the instructions are vague enough to allow for some interpretation and that makes the world go 'round.

I do but speculate. Only a lesson from a baker in Beaucaire (or a post from one) will make me sure (of at least that one particular style...)

So sorry to bring up the bran controversy - quite possible that different bakers - even in Beaucaire have different variants.

And yes, unless I am actually baking in Beaucaire, it is always "facon" (I should know how to put the cedilla on the "c" and yet, I do not...) - but of course the folks in California think they make Champagne so, close enough among friends, eh?

Happy Baking!

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Hans, from my rudimentary French, I believe "façon" means "fashion" or "way", as in bread "in the fashion of" Beaucaire.  So perhaps it means that it is not strictly the Beaucaire method but more like a method that is similar.  Jane... Cendrillon... am I correct? 

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

dougal's picture
dougal

Basically 'in the style of".

 

Since Beaucaire is a place, its like the difference between "Philadelphia-style ice cream" and "Philadelphia ice cream". One means egg-free ice cream, the other means ice cream made or bought in that specific city (and presumably not using egg).

In this case, I'd suggest that we are all aiming for the 'style' of bread that that particular place is known for. So, if it matters to HJ, we all ought to be including the 'façon' ... :-)

Janedo's picture
Janedo

Yes!

Jane 

Janedo's picture
Janedo

When in doubt, make a phone call. But unfortunately the artisan baker I phoned at 9am has already gone home! The bakery is close Sunday and Monday, so I have to call on Tuesday.

From what I gather, from some research on the subject, what is really special about this bread is just the shaping. Otherwise, it really is just white bread. It can be made with sourdough or yeast, but seeing that is a bread that dates back to the 15 century, I dare say it is traditionally sourdough!

I will ask specific questions, but from pictures I have seen, the strip of dough is folded over, not cut. It is then sealed on the other side, so that it forms a shape like a wheat grain sort of, in the shape of a bâtard. This actually makes the shaping super easy especially for large quantities. The dough is rolled out, flipped over and cut into logs and then each bread turned on to it's side, proofed and baked.

What's between the layers is a mystery, but I have read that is traditionally ONLY water. No bran, remoulage, slurry. But, the baker will hopefully tell me what he does. I know that Anis Bouabsa gets free remoulage from his flour supplier and he uses it on his couche so the baguettes don't stick. It doesn't stick to his dough.

OK, that's it for now. More news next week.

Jane 

dougal's picture
dougal

Jane - one detail to ask about (if you could, please) is the proofing.

Which way up? !!!

Do his 'logs' get put on their side before or after proofing?

 

I've wondered if the dough might just be left to 'skin' a little before folding/cutting/building the sandwich to provide a little bit of 'definition' between the pieces.

I also think that sprinkling on a half-handful or less of flour (like the heavy flouring for shaping Boabsa'a baguettes) on top of the flattened dough before making the sandwich, might be regarded as so 'normal' as to go unremarked...

 

I have to say that the use of "remoulage" (finely re-milled bran) is one of those aspects of French baking that barely ever gets a mention outside France. And it does seem to be an important material.

holds99's picture
holds99

Pain de Beaucaire Steps

Pain de Beaucaire Steps

Proth5 had asked:

 

So my first question would be - ends sealed or not?  Then:

1.    How thick should the dough be for the first rectangle 2.    In which direction are the first folds made 3.    The next fold "Comme pour faire un tour aux croissants" - what fold and in which direction 4.    Then which direction do we cut. 5.    How is it stacked - which direction for the cut sides And every little detail... 
        

 

Pat,

Here’s a photo collage of the steps I used making the Pain de Beaucaire.  Starting at the top , left to right.   Then, follow the same (left to right) for each row, like reading the lines of a printed page.

I flattened the dough into a rectangle approximately 1” thick (Suas calls for 1 ½ “).  This go round I cut the dough in half and folded it. 

Anyway, right or wrong that is how I did it.  Re: the proper traditional technique, I have a call in to Le Roi de Beaucaire (a.k.a. Leroy Beaucaire from Hoboken :>)  I don’t know if this helps but at least it gives you an idea of how I did it…this last time (5th iteration).

Next time I’m going to paint both sides of the halved rectangle of flattened dough with the water, spread the bran flakes on the inside middle 1/3 lengthwise (but not to any edges) of just one side of the wet dough.  This leaves the ends and bottom with clean, wet edges.  Then, flip the wet side of one side on top of the bran side of the other, then cut the dough in half along the middle where the bran crosses the center lengthwise.  The cut edge becomes the top of the loaf after proofing the loaves on their sides.  As soon as you turn it over (bran edge up) the loaf will begin to open and spread but will immediately begin to rise after it goes into the oven.

My ends of the loaves, for this iteration, were sealed.

 

Howard

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

is a great photo tool..nice! Seeing your montage shows me that what I had envisioned as the technique was not even close. The art of descriptive writing is truly a gifted talent...visuals are so much easier ..for me, at least..

Betty

proth5's picture
proth5

Informative.  When will that ABandP book arrive?

I'm still struggling mightily with this idea of folding. I'm holding on to it because M. Auzet gives very specific steps and timings and doesn't include the folding as part of the pointage, as one would with what we know as a stretch and fold (nor do I see any evidence that he uses this technique on any of his breads - he uses the spiral mixer to completely develop the dough).

Rest 20 mins, flatten the dough, rest 20 mins, "rabbatre le bords vers le centre", flatten again and fold "comme faire un tour aux croissants" (and I find that he uses a tri-fold tour to make batards - so...), let rest for 30 mins.

It is this rectangle that is then rolled and cut.  I'm still thinking that it is the formation of the rectangle that is the key to the particular open crumb at a hydration of 60% (and may I say after spending a lot of time getting used to higher hydration doughs, this feels like a big rubber ball). Also, why bother to give instructions that are so detailed if it is just a matter of getting a one inch thick rectangles.  I also feel after 15 mins at first speed, this gluten is developed - it doesn't need folds to develop the gluten.

Bernard Clayton, Jr. in the book "The Breads of France..." talks about this bread and insists that the low hydration is a requirement and relates that the boulanger who coached him "scorned" the step where water is brushed on the dough (although he does not reference the folding).

We've got a lot of individual variation on this - which is only right.

But I'm doing a batch even as I type.  We'll see.

And booking that trip to Luberon just as soon as possible :>)

Pat

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Where did you order AB&P from?

Hans Joakim

proth5's picture
proth5

I ordered it from TMB Baking - which is connected with SFBI along with a couple of other light items.  They told me it would take 4 weeks.  I haven't counted carefully, but I think the 4 weeks have almost passed...

Hope this helps.

Pat

holds99's picture
holds99

Glad you found the photo collage helpful.  Guess the old saying: "A picture is worth a thousand words" is correct, espcially for this particular baking exercise. 

Howard

keesmees's picture
keesmees

Woww, thats a beauty howard; nice rustique crust. Seeing your pics (and steveB's!) I couldn't wait and just setup a levain. I'll try dinner rolls façon beaucaire tomorrow.

 

holds99's picture
holds99

Keesmees,

Thanks.  One thing I did that I think really helped was I increased the hydration of the final dough mix by approx. 10%.  In his "Test" dough (2 lbs. of dough) Suas calls for 9 oz. of water in the final dough mix, but having made the dough 4 times previously, I increased the water by an ounce and put in 10 ozs. and got better results this time around.  The dough wasn't too sticky with the increased hydration, but just right in terms of being workable.  I mixed everything by hand and did Bertinet's slap and fold, plus the 3 stretches at 20 min. intervals during the 1st. hour of bulk fermentation.

Good luck with you dinner rolls and be sure to post some pix of the results.

Howard

keesmees's picture
keesmees

yepp howard, I'll give it a try. and post some pics.

will use a 66% dough. but don't have bran or something like that.  but I'll try water (after jane) and maybe some rice flour or slurry for the experiment. 

found this one:

http://web.mac.com/atelierpain/atelier-pain/Blog/Entr%C3%A9es/2008/1/4_nouveau_billet_6.html 

this site takes about 5-10 minutes to load properly!

keesmees's picture
keesmees

it didn't work. I've read jane's last answer and try again in a week or so with a  more dry dough and some bran:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31104532@N06/

keesmees's picture
keesmees

pfffffft,  it is a real challenge to make this pain de beaucaire: rolls don't open proper, dough too wet, dough too dry, too little bran. dough too high to put on its side, etc etc etc.

your blog got me off the streets for two weeks howard. but its almost under control now.

you made my day today. tnx:

 

 http://www.flickr.com/photos/9191909@N07/3018211625/

holds99's picture
holds99

Keesmees,

You did so goooood.  Very nice loaf.   If it's any consolation I went through 5 iterations before I got something I considered close.  I'm thinking, after you've mastered this one it's mostly downhill.  Thanks for sharing your results. 

Howard