The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Does anyone use a Bosh Mixer to make bread?

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Does anyone use a Bosh Mixer to make bread?

I am looking for a good mixer to make bread in. I have a 15 year old Kitchen Aid and I’ve been having problems with it…I’m afraid it’s about to go out on me. I had thought I’d just pick up a new Kitchen Aid but after reading some reviews on the net about the new Kitchen Aids I know that’s not what I want.

 

I grind my own wheat and make all of our bread with 100% whole wheat so the dough is fairly heavy. I make two loaves of bread at a time and usually make bread at least two... sometimes three times a week.

 

I’ve been looking at the Bosch Universal Plus Mixer and I was wondering if anyone has used one and what they think about it.

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/Bosch_Universal_Plus_Mixer_MUM6N10UC.aspx

 

My son thinks I should get a Hobart but I really don’t want to spend that much money and I want a mixer that will fit on my kitchen counter.

 

Any advice would be appreciated.

 

 Edited to add some pics of some loaves that I just took out of the oven. On is a little miss-shaped but it eats just as well.

 

Kent's picture
Kent

Good Morning Betty, I use a Bosch mixer and am very satisfied with it. Noticibly more power then the Kitchen Aid Mixer we have. Another brand you can look at is the Blendtec Mixer. Same price range as the Bosch. I went with the Bosch because of the good name .  http://www.blendtec.com/Mix-n-Blend.aspx

 

Kent

keesmees's picture
keesmees

and the third one you have to look at is the braun. My 700 watt multipurpose kitchen machine is in use for 11 years now. he has no problems with 1200 g dough.

his successor, the  foodprocessor K3000 has 950 watt. 200-250€.

http://www.vergelijk.nl/keukenmachine/braun/k_3000/specs.rhtml

kees

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Thank you both for your quick replies….

 

Kent how old is your mixer? I am finding in my search for a new mixer that the newer mixers don't have the power or durability of the older models. The manufactures have cut back on quality and durability to save money so a newer model isn’t going to be a good as an older one of the same brand. 

fsu1mikeg's picture
fsu1mikeg

I have the smaller version and it works great.  It is more than adequate for all of the formulas scaled to accomodate the home baker in the bread books.  I believe it's about 450 watts and, as the name suggests, is very compact taking up little space on my counter.  The normal sized one might be too big for your counter, but I'm sure it would work even better if you need more power.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

I love my Bosch  mixer for large amounts of dough, but I don't use it for my single loaf of Susan's sourdough. I make "discard" bread every week and make 3 or 4 loaves at a time. Another plus is that it is very easy to clean. A yes vote, A.

Russ's picture
Russ

Out of Curiosity...

How large a batch of dough can you make in your Bosch Compact? How has it been for other functions, like cookies and cakes?

I got one for my mother for her birthday without knowing many of the finer details of the mixer, and wonder a bit about how capable a machine it is. I have only seen rave reviews of the Compact, which is why I chose it for her, but don't know much more than that.

Russ

coffeemachine's picture
coffeemachine

hi russ,

 

i personally am in love with my bosch compact. the machine supposedly can comfortably handle 6 lbs of dough, although i have not needed to make that large of a batch. it makes great cookies. and depending on if you bought any of the extra attachments, it practically does everything: the blender works very well; the continuous shredder works well, but the feed tube is not that big; grain mill works slowly, but you can adjust the coarseness of the grind while grinding. i also have the food processor and meat grinder attachments, but have not yet used them, so can not say. overall, i think this is money well spent.

 

hope your mother enjoys it. 

 

violet 

OldDoughNut's picture
OldDoughNut

I have the older Bosch Concept mixer, not the Universal, but I can tell you that Bosch customer service has treated me very well. 

My Bosch saleperson gave me the service phone number to call, and I was caught off guard when a real person answered the phone. Then I was further bewildered when they said they'd replace my paddles for me under warranty (which I didn't realize were still under warranty) - no questions asked, no hassle.  I got off the phone thinking it was too good to be true, but sure enough, the new paddles arrived in a week. 

They didn't ask me to send in all the appropriate paperwork before they could process my claim, they just honored their warranty. I haven't dealt with customer service like that in a very, very long time.  Your mileage may vary, but I've been very pleased.  (Not happy that the part broke, but incredibly impressed that they remedied the situation so quickly.)

 

Kent's picture
Kent

Hi Betty, My mixer is a year old. A lot of power. More then the older one. Eric of http://www.breadtopia.com/ uses one. I bought mine from his site. You can give hm an email with questions on the mixer. He is very helpful. 

 

Kent

Jolly's picture
Jolly

Yup! I have the Bosch Universal:

 

If I was given another choice to buy a mixer I wouldn't buy one now. Why? I started using Richard Bertinets Slap and Fold Method in mixing up dough. I'm actually producing a better bread dough without the use of a dough hook machine.

 

Now I'm working with heavier dough such as seed breads with added grains and I'm using Richard's method in slaping and folding the dough and producing light and airy breads laced with holes using whole grains. 

 

Now if they could develop a mixer that would slap the dough on the counter and fold the dough over, then I would consider buying one.

 

Bosch Mixer---is now collecting dust. I wish I had heard about Richards (Slap & Fold Method) for kneading dough before I had bought my mixer. What a waste of money.

 

I'm now hand mixing my dough in a large wooden mixing bowl. Once I gather up the dough into a ball I then start Richard's Slap & Fold method, and I just love slapping the dough on the counter. Its a good way to release added stress. 

 

In using the Slap and Fold Method sometimes it will only take about 3 to 5 minutes. It all depends on what flours and grains you may be adding to the dough and then it could take up to 10 minutes. For me its usually 5 minutes. And when my beeper goes off I hate to stop slapping the dough. I just love doing it and I find it very addicting.

 

When the gluten start building up within the dough the slapping sound isn't as loud. It will begin to tone down little by little and the dough will begin to soften and get elastic. Try using this method in kneading your dough the next time you get ready to bake.

 

What I like best about using this method is only having to clean up one bowl and not having to drag out my mixer and then make space on the counter for it, which I have very little of. Plus washing the dough hook, the mixer bowl, and wiping the mixer down before putting it away. I'm saving more time by using Richard Bertinets Method and loving it too.

 

My choice in buying a mixer is not to buy one. Make a search for Richard Bertinet's video so you can apply his method of (Slapping & Folding) the dough the next time you bake.

 

Slappy Jolly

 

 

 

 

sharsilber's picture
sharsilber

I watched that wonderful video too and returned the kitchen aid mixer that I had just bought in favor of the slap and fold meathod.  Well 6 loaves later I was missing that mixer!  Yesterday I made 8 loaves and had to pull out the old food processor as I was not feeling very "slappy" after tossing down 6 pounds of dough for a while.

Sharon

PS If you need a place to store that dusty Bosch - I have a space on my counter :)

www.thebraidedloaf.com

Jolly's picture
Jolly

Sharon I'm awfully sorry you didn't enjoy the Slap & Fold Method by Richard Bertinet.

 

I don't knead up 8 loves at time either so I could easily see why you would miss your mixer. Once upon a time I baked breads as you do for my family. But now My children are married and I'm throughly baking at ease about 3 times per week. Baking different varieties of breads. But when I slap and fold I'm usually slapping 3 lbs. of dough around. 

 

Living at the elevationof 5,000 feet I don't need to slap the dough very much (about 3 minutes) and its ready. The only time I use my mixer is when I have company that's when I knead up dough in volume. But even after I need the dough in the mixer I'll slap 3 lbs portions of dough for a good 3 minutes, until I have all the dough worked up.

The 3 minute slap & fold method really lightens my bread and gives me a better crumb and a higher rise. But I tend to think living at a lower elevation you might have to slap the dough longer.

 

I'm also a a Country Girl living on a ranch. We got horses to tend too and tons of works on the ranch. So throwing around 6 lbs of dough is nothing for me especially after lifting and moving heavy bales of hay for the horses and sacks of grains, and stacking wood for the long cold winter and so fourth. And the work never ends. 

 

I'm just tough old gal thinking everyone works like I do. Sorry if I threw you off track. Get yourself a mixer. I'll just keep on slapping and folding my dough.

 

By the way I've had my Bosch mixer for 34 years and its still going.

 

Stoped at a garage sale and bought a Universal Bosch mixer for $3.50. Gave the mixer to my daughter who is now begining to bake. Can you imagine buying a Bosch mixer for that price. It was in very good condition, and had all the accesories plus it came with a salad shredder. You can't buy them now with a salad shredder. The salad maker shredds beautifully you can shredd a whole head of cabbage for cole slaw without having to empty the mixing bowl.

 

When I bought my mixer I bought an extra attachment a meat grinder. My husband goes hunting each year so I have a lot of meat to grind, it works great as a meat grinder. Last year I ground up about 20 pounds of bear meat. I've been grinding meat for years now using my Bosch mixer. With the meat grinder you can also make delicious sauages. 

 

Jolly

 

sharsilber's picture
sharsilber

I did in fact hand knead a loaf today.  I am doing a challah from the Bread Bible and I thought that for a new recipe it would be better to get a real feel for the dough.  It is fun when you only have one batch to do. 

I love that you found a 3 dollar mixer.  People around here are selling 10 year old Kitchen Aids for $75! And they dont even have all the parts.

Next time I slap some dough on the counter (which will be tomorrow) I will think of you and your farm (and bear sausage which I never even heard of).

Sharon

www.thebraidedloaf.com

Jolly's picture
Jolly

 

Sharon:

 

If you have ever eaten buffalo meat, then you can get a pretty good idea what the flavor of bear meat like. It's absolutely deleicious. Most people tend to think its a greasy meat. Not at all its very good. Actually I like it better than beef.

 

I very seldom buy meat at the market it's all wild game and fresh baked breads.

 

I'm glad to hear that you're going to continue to Slap & Fold the dough. I found and old traditional farm cookbook and they call the Slap & Fold Method (Tossing the dough). It's interesting how this method came about here in the states. I it was Betty Crocker that started using it to make Can Do Quick Breads to help shorten kneading time. It gives a lot of history about original American Breads and the history of yeast it just full of good information on baking. Lots of good info...for learning.

 

In the cookbook it contains all the complete up-to-date shortcuts to make yeast breads as they developed them down through 1969. So at that time they had introduced the slap and fold method as (tossing the dough), and letting the dough rise 2 to 3 times for a cool rise method. To give the busy housewife more time in between her busy household schedule to bake. The book is really interesting. 

 

So have a good day tomorrow (tossing the dough).

 

Jolly

 

Jolly's picture
Jolly

Slappy Sharon:

 

I forgot to mention another reason why I don't use my Bosch mixer very much I bake with a  liquid sourdough starter and firm sourdough starter.

 

Normally when using sourdough starters I don't knead the dough no more than 3-4 minutes for the starters have already started producing elastic strands of gluten. So I omit kneading the dough for 10 minutes.

 

In using yeast I would tend to think that you would knead the dough for a longer period of time to develop the gluten. 

 

That's why I stoped using my mixer just to knead the dough a few minutes. I simply didn't want to do all the clean up with my mixer.

 

So now I'm just using a large wooden bowl in mixing up dough. Have you ever used one? I saw a post on using a wooden mixing bowl on this site and read how wonderful they are for mixing up doughs.

 

Their great for mixing up 4 lbs of dough or maybe more. Its so easy to mix up the dough in these bowls because the bowl is so wide and shallow so it makes for easy mixing. I'm using Eric's large Danish whisk in mixing up the dough and I have my dough mixed up in 3 minutes. Then I start tossing the dough until it feel soft and elastic, which only takes about 3 minutes more. A grand total of 6 minutes. That includes mixing the flour into the dough.

 

Since I started mixing dough in a wooden bowl now I want to buy a larger bowl. Hopefully I'll fine one soon.

 

"Oh yes! I forgot to mention mixing dough in a wooden bowl is addicting too.

 

Happy Slappy Jolly

 

sharsilber's picture
sharsilber

I know what you mean about the clean up.  The batch I did today from a prefermet I started last night I did in a large plastic bowl that I used to use for proofing (now I use 6qt measuring containers).  I wonder why the wood is better - more rustic?  Since I do sweet bread I don't use a starter, however, after reading Reihart's whole grain book in the bookstore today I am thinking that I might try my hand at sour dough once his book is returned to my local library. 

My mother offered to buy me the Bosch Universal for my birthday (and everyother holilday this year)  -but I am still on the fence.

Sharon

www.thebraidedloaf.com

sandrasfibre's picture
sandrasfibre

hello.  I wondered if anyone tried that method.  I saw the video only once.  Do you have the link for it.  I would like to see it again.  good for you, happy baking, sandy

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Thank you all so much for all the help!!! I really do appreciate it.

Annie…I’m not sure what you mean by “discard” bread?? But thanks for the vote!!

 

DoughNut…If you wouldn’t mind sharing that number I’d love to put it away for future reference.

 

Kent…Thank you!! I’ll check out the site.

 

Slappy…I live in a very rural area and all we can get out here is dial-up so I can’t watch videos on the net… they won’t load up with the slow connection.

 

I don’t think I could use that method anyway because I use an extremely wet dough with a lot of vital wheat gluten in it so I have to have a mixer to make the bread.

 

I’m diabetic and my recipe is a high protein, whole wheat bread that’s designed to have less of an impact of my blood sugar. Luckily it also has a very good flavor and my family loves it so we all eat the same bread.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Betty, this is what I call the bread I make to use up the sourdough starter that I discard when I refresh either of my starters. I save it until I have a container full then make a big batch of bread. I do add some instant yeast and sometimes dried milk or instant potato flakes, and lately raisins which my neighbors seem to like. A.

OldDoughNut's picture
OldDoughNut

I don't have the phone number anymore, but I'm sure if you called Pleasant Hill Grain, they'd also be able to give it to you.  It was a customer service line for Bosch kitchen machines in the US.

I know what you mean about those rural internet connections.  I can't watch video tutorials from home either, and my workplace censors all streaming media. Certainly it's not "work-related" for me, but they sure would be fun to see! :)

cady's picture
cady

Cady

We had our first Bosh for 20 years.  My sweet wife made all our bread - sandwich loaf - for our family of 7.  She could make five (5) loaves at a time and often made 3 batches per week.  We would make 75 pounds of flour into cinnamon reefs for Christmas.  We used it a lot.

After 20 years it started to die.  However, I must say that my daughter helped it die.   While in her early teens she was making chocolate chip cookies.  We keep our flour in white 5 gallon buckets.  The bucket was empty and she found another in storage.  Unfortunately it was not flour.  It was builders lime. (I used it to turn dried corn into hominy for pozole - a Mexican soup).  Well, she made a very large batch of concrete cookies (5 1/2 cups of lime).  I really believe the Bosh would be with us still.  Our second Bosh is now about 10 years old and I make lots of bagels, and hearth bread. It works fine. 

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Annie...I bet it is good!! And thanks for the explanation.

 

Cady...Thanks for the vote and thanks for the laugh!!

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Hi Betty.  I have a Bosch Universal Plus and it works fine for me.  I bought the grinding attachment for it and grind my own wheat with it.  The bread I like to make with it is a Whole Wheat Sourdough that is very wet.  This is the only bread mixer that I have ever used so I don't know how it compares but I very happy with it.

You wouldn't mind sharing your recipe for whole wheat loaf bread would you?  I want to start making some.

sharsilber's picture
sharsilber

I am also thinking about buying the Bosch and would love to grind my own wheat with it.  I had not seen a grain mill attachment on Pleasant Hill - is it not the same as the meat grinder is it?  And how much can you grind at a time?

Sharon

PS Take a look at Peter Reinhart's new whole grain bread book. I looked at it today and he has a meathod for making whoie grain bread that he claims to be better than most heavy whole grain bread recipes.

www.thebraidedloaf.com

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

I got my Bosch and grinding attachment from this webpage.  http://www.nutritionlifestyles.com/bosch.htm#mum6wb

The grinding attachment is a ways down the page.  I normally  grind about 600 grams at a time.  I know I can put more in there at a time but all you need to do is keep adding to the funnel and take away the flour from the output.

BettyR's picture
BettyR

I use a Nutramill to grind my wheat...even though I grind it on a medium course grind it's still fairly fine.

I use 4 parts hard white wheat to 1 part hard red. I grind my flour in 10 pound batches and store it in a large plastic container in the freezer. 10 pounds of flour will last me a couple of weeks if we don't have any company. I use organic wheat I order from Bob's Red Mill.

I also order my Vital Wheat Gluten from Bob's Red Mill in a 25 pound bag and I keep the bag in a large freezer in the garage and store a smaller amount in the freezer in the house.

The recipe is my own; after I was diagnosed with diabetes I did a lot of research on nutrition and with the help of some good folks in the low carb community we came up with this "formula" for a loaf of bread that has almost no impact on my blood sugar; so thankfully I don't have to give up my bread. The bread is very high protein and very nutritious but thankfully it's also very good and my family loves it so I can make the same bread for all of us.

I will do my best to tell you how I make my bread and you can experiment and see what works best for you.

2-1/2 cups hot water                                                                                      

1/3 heaping cup non-fat dried milk                                                                    

1 tablespoon sugar                                                                                        

1/3 heaping cup Splenda                                                                             

2-1/2 teaspoons salt                                                                                      

1/4 cup vegetable oil                                                                                        

3 extra large eggs                                                                                         

1/2 cup Vital Wheat Gluten                                                                                

3 cups whole wheat flour (scooped and shaken but not leveled off)                         

4 teaspoons instant yeast                                                                                  

2 cups whole wheat flour (scooped and shaken but not leveled off)

Place the first 9 ingredients in the mixer and mix on low speed to combine and then mix on medium speed until it starts to get stringy. 

Change to the dough hood and add the last 2 cups of flour and knead stopping every once in a while for a few seconds to give the gluten a moment to rest. This helps the gluten to develop better. This dough is going to be so impossibly wet you will think there is no way it will ever come together but it will. 

It takes about 20 to 25 minutes in my kitchen aid but it does come together and form a dough. Let it rise, shape it, let it rise again and bake at 375° for 26 to 27 minutes or until the loaf reaches an internal temperature of 180° to 185°. 

Good luck and happy baking.                                                                                                            

 

 

bonnie1345's picture
bonnie1345

I have had my Bosch Universal about 8 years. I can make six loaves in it with ease, but now that my children are grown I usually make 2 loaves. When I do make six loaves I freeze part and take out of the freezer as needed. In the days with a large family at home the loaves would  be gone in five days. prior to having the Universal I had the Compact (my dealer was kind enough to allow a trade) It did two loave batches with ease and also could make a double batch of cookies without a bit of struggle. You can't go wrong, I assure you. A hobert would be a bit of an overkill for home use in my opinion. I had a kitchen aid also and believe me this is much more of a mixer.

 Sign me...............Bosch Fan, lol........  Bonnie

bonnie1345's picture
bonnie1345

I also grind my own wheat and as you know wheat dough is heavier......

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Thanks so much Bonnie...

I really appreciate the input. The mixer is supposed to be my Christmas gift but I'm really afraid that my Kitchen Aid is about to go out on me. I was planning on going ahead and ordering it, then sticking it in a closet until Christmas. If the Kitchen Aid lasts that long then I'll wrap the mixer up and stick it under the tree...but I want to have the mixer here just in case the Kitchen Aid dies so I wouldn't have to go a week or more without bread while waiting for it to ship. 

Jolly's picture
Jolly

What a sweet loving mother you have. I love buying gifts for my kids. You should accept her gift of any mixer that you may choose. It will really please your mother. I hate when my kids refuse my offer of buying an expensive gift. Sometimes it hurts my feelings so now I just buy the gift and give it to them. Accept the offer and make your mother happy.

 

Wooden Salad Bowl---What I like about mixing the dough in the wooden salad bowls is how wide the bowl is. You can quickly mix up the dough with the wide open space, the bowl offers you, and quickly gather up the dough to knead into a ball of rough dough. Plus using Eric's Danish Whisk in a wide open space, its perfect. I would like to buy another bowl, just to let the dough rise in the bowl.

 

Ross Clothing Store---I've seen them at this department store on sale for $10.00 went back to buy one. But they had sold out all the salad bowls at that price. I'll keep checking for a new shipment.

 

I'm still adapting Rose Levy's "Golden Oat Bread" (its a seed bread recipe) and I'm sure I'll be happy with the results. The first Time I mixed up her bread it was a flop for I live at 5,00 feet. The second time around it came out beautiful once I adapted the reicpe. Now I'm trying to lighten the loaf further so when I mixed up the dough this morning the dough felt much lighter even though it had the same ingredients. I cooked the oat the recipe called for instead of soaking the oats for 15 minutes in water.

 

I grabbed one of my traditional cookbooks which goes back to 1971. Its called Carla Emery's Old Fashion Recipe Book. Carla kneads her dough on her wooden dinning room table, it shows a picture of a massive glob of dough on the table, it just about covered the whole table top. She said their is nothing like kneading dough on hard wood.

 

Anyway she talks on and on about adding cooked grains to bread dough and how they help lighten her breads. But when she added soaked grains to the dough she produced heavier breads. So if you like a more chewy bread then soak the grains in water. But should you want a lighter bread cook the grains to produce a lighter loaf of bread.

 

Today I decide to try her theory out. So I mixed up two batches of "The Golden Oat Bread." Mixed up the dough using two starters one an active, wild yeast liquid basic white starter, along with a active firm white wild yeast starter, and cooked oats. The second batch of dough I simply made with soaked oats. While I was tossing the dough I noticed the dough with the (cooked oats) was much lighter and plyable, and the dough with the (soaked oats) was much heavier. Now I'll have to wait and see how they bakes up. which will be later tonight.

 

I'll keep playing with the recipe until I produce the results I want in my bread. Sometimes I may bake up the recipe as much as 6 to 8 times. All the while I learn something new at every bake. And I won't move on until I master the recipe. Its like I'm addicted and I got to keep going so, I'll bake everyday until its mastered. Then I move on to another recipe and the whole process starts over again. But I love the challenge.

 

With the seed bread recipe, which I'm trying to master in producing a lighter version this will be my fourth bake and living at a higher elevation makes it a little more chalenging. Plus I can't use yeast to help lighten my breads due to an allergy problem. So I'm hoping this time around the crumb will be lighter.

 

I'm still reading Carla Emery's Cookbook its so informative and down to earth. She also included her family in the cookbook making it more enjoyable to read. I'm a collector of old traditional cookbooks. Its amazing how many cooking and baking tips you can learn from these books.

 

Slappy Jolly

 

Jim S's picture
Jim S

I used a Bosch mixer for 33 years, making bread about once a week, until I moved out of the US… at which point I put it in storage.  The slow speed had stopped working, but I think I’ll have it repaired if I ever move back to the US (and 110 volt electricity).  While I have never owned a Kitchen Aid, it looks less convenient for adding ingredients than the Bosch, in which the dough hooks or mixers attach at the bottom of the bowl, leaving the top open to add ingredients.  I highly recommend it, assuming the newer models are of similar quality.  The design seems to be the same.

 

 BTW, in the last two years, without the Bosch, I have been happily kneading by hand.  The only disadvantage, to me, is that I could comfortably use wetter dough in the Bosch.

 

Jim S

Santiago Chile      

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Thank you Jim.

My son doesn't like the Bosh because it's made out of plastic and I do agree that plastic won't last as long as metal... but then my Kitchen Aid is made out of metal and it hasn't lasted 33 years. 

 

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

When  I was looking for a mixer I found myself in a dead tie for the Bosch Universal and the DLX 2000. I ended up choosing the DLX with no regrets, but who says I would regret the Universal either? 

I then tried two KAs (artisan and pro 600) and I HATED them. They were messier, harder to clean, harder to access the bowl while it was beating and I was afraid of dough getting up in the workings of the machine.

BUT... by that time I had been using my DLX for 2 years. I had "mostly" learned how to use it (and there is a learning curve with this and the bosch) and switching to a KA didn't transition well. So, if you are used to a KA, you may find a different way of doing it a bit disconcerting at first, but stick with it as I think you will be much happier in the end.

I LOVE that the DLX comes with two bowls. Since I also bake cakes, I do the frosting in the stainless steel one and the cake in the plastic one. I keep a small KA handheld for quick jobs (beating eggs/cream, etc).

 

Melissa

 

                                Sweet Melissa's
Custom cakes made from scratch using organic ingredients
http://www.sweetmelissas.net/     http://sweetmelissas.blogspot.com/

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Melissa,

Thank you very much...I took a look at the mixer and I really like the looks of it. I really appreciate the reply. 

Betty

sharsilber's picture
sharsilber

I just bought a second hand KA in an attempt to save money.  I can say with some certainty that I do not like it for bread.  My food processor does a much better job (be it with only a small amount of dough.  I am just going to bite the bullet and get the Bosch and keep the KA for cookies which I think is more what it is made for.  I am also temped to buy the icecream attachement for the KA to put it to good use.

Sharon

www.thebraidedloaf.com

Oldcampcook's picture
Oldcampcook

I bought a used Bosch Universal two years ago from Ebay.  Best purchase I believe I have ever made.  I do 3 - 4 batches of different doughs every weekend.  I simply rinse out the bowl and the dough hook off and start on the next batch.


I can be feeding starters or measuring ingredients or a host of other things while it is kneading.


I did buy the continuous grinder attachment later, also off Ebay, and it sure makes chopping my ingredients for fried rice, etc, a piece of cake (pun intended).


I have the address, if anyone wants it,  for a Bosch repair shop in Wichita Kansas that repaired another Bosch base for me and did a great, reasonably priced job.


Bob