The Fresh Loaf

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ficelles and half ones

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keesmees's picture
October 14, 2008 - 1:45am -- keesmees

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keesmees's picture
Submitted by keesmees on

tried uploading this pic several times. finally he did it. ( baking the bread was less work). the pic is a bit grainy. a better one is on:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/9191909@N07/2892665790/

66% dough with crusty-bread flour, preferment with leaven and final dough with a bit fresh yeast.

holds99's picture
Submitted by holds99 on

From here they look very nice.  Which recipe did you use and how did the crumb turn out?

Howard

keesmees's picture
Submitted by keesmees on

cheers howard,

this is the crumb.

you'll find the recipe on the same page, when you scroll down a bit. 

 http://www.flickr.com/photos/9191909@N07/2891826505/

very short baking time: 17-18 minutes at 230°C, thats why the crust is relatively thin 

if you like a thicker crust, lower temperature a bit: 225°C and bake 20 minutes (maximum)

kees

holds99's picture
Submitted by holds99 on

Kees,

Thanks for pointing me to the recipe.  I missed it.  I'll go back and take a look.  Again, you did a great job.  Reason I was asking about the recipe is because I have been fiddling around with baguettes for years searching for the holy grail (the perfect baguette recipe)...I'm still searching.  

In your post you showed a picture and mentioned flattening them out for shaping.  I don't know if you've read the Acme Bakery baguette method in Maggie Glezer's book Artisan Breads, but she preserves as much of the gas as possible by shaping them in 3 stages (after bulk fermentation).  This is not intended as a criticism, simply an observation; it seems degassing them completely, through flattening them, will result in the final baguette having a tighter crumb as opposed to the larger holes and more open crumb---because you will be deflating the precious accumulated gas in the dough.  What do you think? 

Howard

keesmees's picture
Submitted by keesmees on

my pleasure howard,

no no, for baguettes I never flatten or overstretch the ripe dough and never close the seam of a dough with the ball of my hands.

easy, gentle folding and shaping. and putting the dough with the seam underneath is enough.   thats all.

take a good look at how these professionals do in the middle and the end of this youtube footage. there is no pressure at all. just love.

 http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=vmflTRZ6dWs

 

holds99's picture
Submitted by holds99 on

Thanks for sharing that great video by the professional bakers showing terrific gluten development.  There was also a second video from a home baker, in England I presume, who really understands the process and produced 2 beautiful baguettes.  As you said, "...no pressure at all. just love".

Howard

keesmees's picture
Submitted by keesmees on

Howard.

one more significant note. I just recognized it on: 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9245/tighter-baguette-shaping-and-my-second-visit-anis-bouabsa039s-bakery#comment-47343

look at jane's newest pics on her blog and then the above video again:  there is a big difference in handling the dough during shaping:

the men in the video don't,  but the baker in jane's pics uses abundant dusting flour.

in the latter case - of course - you should seal the seam tightly or it will unroll during baking.

Like the video, I always shape on a lightly oiled surface and only use dusting flour on the 'couche'.

holds99's picture
Submitted by holds99 on

I'm a total convert to the abundant use of flour, particularly on high hydration doughs when they're placed into bannetons, couches, etc.  After baking the excess flour on the loaf can always be brushed away.

Best of luck to you with your baking endeavors and keep posting your bread experiences, I'll do the same.

Howard