The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sandwich bread

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lrnardi's picture
lrnardi

Sandwich bread

Hello,

I am sort of a novice maker, I am trying to make all of my bread at home for all our needs. I am having problems with my sandwich bread which always comes out with a huge crack in the sides. I have tried to proof first, I have tried baking with a pan of water in the oven at the same time. I have tried staggering the pans.

Can anyone suggest something? The bread tases ok, but looks and cuts bad.

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I'm curious as to what you mean by cracks.

Herbed Sandwich Loaf

Something like this?

Jolly's picture
Jolly

I'm sure you underproofed your bread---it will be dense with a big split along one side of the loaf. I've had this happen so many times when I first started baking.

Let it proof for a longer period of time.

 

Jolly

Jolly's picture
Jolly

Irnard:

In the search box look for videos on folding you're bread dough. Once you learn how to fold your dough it will help lighten you're breads giving the dough more elasticity so it can stretch when its expanding in the oven.

 

I beleive Mark Sinclair has a video on folding the dough. Put his name in the search box. I know their are others too. Just make a search so you can learn how to fold you're dough.

 

Jolly

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I knead my sandwich bread dough. All of it. I tend to knead anything that isn't too wet to work with. One of the things I do is to knead until the dough comes together, which is about 7 minutes or so, then rest the dough for 20-25 minutes. After that, I knead in the salt for a few more minutes, probably 5-7 again. This gives me plenty of kneading. Since starting to do things this way I've gotten good bread every time.

lrnardi's picture
lrnardi

Miss. Brim, it looks totaly like that on the side. I tried to post a pic but I cant figure that out either! =)

Maybe I am under kneeding.

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I would go with the overproofing thing, then.  The dough for the loaf in the (crappy) photo was in the freezer.  I got it out, let it come up to room temp and proof, and then put it in the oven.

I've gone to baking more than one loaf at a time now that I can and I just stick baked loaves in the freezer.  I get them out of the freezer and put them in a 350 degree oven until they warm again.  Works well. 

holds99's picture
holds99

One thing that sounds pretty certain, from your description, is that your loaf was underproofed when it went into the oven.  Underproofing causes splits and cracks during the initial baking cycle (8-10 minutes), when oven-spring is taking place.  With undeproofed loaves the leavening hasn't reached its peak before being placed into the oven and as heat from the oven interacts with the leavening it kicks in big time and causes a very quick rise that breaks through the skin or the dough causing splits and cracks.  You may be rushing the final fermentation/ proofing process.  Sounds like you're baking your loaves in loaf pans.  Rule of thumb for kneading is 8-10 minutes (stand mixer) on med/low (No. 2 speed on a KA) and 10-12 minutes by hand.  During final proofing, in the pans, you really want your dough to double in volume but only double.  Don't be tempted to try to see how big you can get the loaf during final proofing. Otherwise you run the risk of overproofing the loaves and they may fall or sink as they begin the initial bakng cycle.  So, you're walking a thin line, so to speak.  But don't get discouraged, it's part of the learning process. 

Which recipe did you use? Is it a direct method dough (yeast only)? How long did you knead it? Mixer or by hand? How long did it bulk ferment (first rise) and how long was final proof? (in the pans?)  A photo, especially of the crumb, would really help.

 Howard