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Dough Whisks

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404's picture
404

Dough Whisks

Silly me I just bought a Pastry blade thinking I was getting a dough wisk.

 Does anyone use a dough wisk? I've seen them in a couple of the videos and they look to be a good tool if your regularly making small batches ( 1 or 2 loafs) of  bread.

http://www.breadtopia.com/store/danish-dough-whisk.html

 

Ohh, and does anyone know where I can get one in the UK or do I have to ship it to a friend in the US?

 

 

leemid's picture
leemid

I don't want to say anything bad about the KA one I have, they gave it to me free at a local class. But after using it a few times I have gone back to the wooden paddle/spoon I have used for 30 odd years. Just comfort? Don't know. I don't really like to clean the whisk, the spoon is easier. Does the dough mix faster with the whisk? Probably. But with arthritis in my hands, the other handle is better for me.

Tell you what... I haven't been to Britain since the early 70s... Buy my ticket and I will personally deliver you a seldom used bread whisk, free!

That's my offer, and I'm sticking to it.

Lee

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

I have one I bought from Eric at Breadtopia and I love it. I make Susan's sourdough all the time and it works really well. I have arthritic hands and my only problem is that the handle is rather thick - I'm not sure whether there is a smaller one available. Make that 2 tickets and I'll help Lee carry his seldom used one! A.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I found my dough whisk in a wonderful little shop in Northern Michigan (Cutler's) at a cost of five bucks. A terrific gadget when refreshing sourdough!

Given the strength of the Euro against the USD, why not visit Northern Michigan and pick up a whisk at Culter's? It's located just a couple blocks away from beautiful Little Traverse Bay of Lake Michigan and there are some very good restaurants in the area.

Our forests are getting dressed in their flashy autumn best and the colors are spectacular!

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I have one I bought from Eric a year or so ago. At first I thought it was a great tool and it is handy for a limited number of tasks. It is helpful when breaking up a pre ferment in the water from the next stage and at the same time helping to froth up the water mix to add air in the dough. A single mixer beater works as well.

Honestly though, today I wouldn't buy another one and certainly not if I had to import it. A sturdy Tablespoon and my trusty plastic dough scraper is all you need. I let time do it's work once the dough comes together as a shaggy mass. Watch the Bertinet video and forget about the whisk. It's way easier and way cheaper.

Eric

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The dough whisk is my favorite tool for mixing after feeding a liquid starter or a rye sour, which is a thick paste consistency. For thicker or stiffer doughs, I usually use a rubber spatula with a rather stiff blade. It works like a plastic dough scraper with a handle.

So, I use the whisk for only a few mixing jobs, but I think it's worth having. This of course is my "cost benefit analysis." Yours may be different.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I'm a collector of kitchen gadgets.  I really like mine and do use it...in fact I have the small one and the large one.  It does everything it says.  It mixes the way a wisk, wiskes!! Or you can use a spoon...if you want to mix with a spoon or wisk with a fork!!  Had to put that in just for fun....but really, it surprised me how fast and thorough it gets the job done.  I would recommend it.

Sylvia

janij's picture
janij

I have one that I use for small batches of dough.  I think it works quicker than a wooden spoon does.  They aren't expensive.  I don't know if I would have one shipped overseas though.  Is there no upscale cooking store around there?  That is the easiest place to find them in the States.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

I seem to remember the dough whisks come from Denmark so they should be available in the UK - or did I dream it? A.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


David

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I've had it for donkey's years, my father used it when he made his bread, and I'm still using it.  It goes back to the time of The Galloping Gourmet, when he started a line of baking/cooking gadgets; it's strong and sturdy, and it doesn't feel right using anything else.

BakeryBits's picture
BakeryBits

We at BakeryBits have dough whisks: 


http://bakerybits.co.uk/Dough-Whisk-P1341818.aspx


in both light and dark handled versions.

mfruin's picture
mfruin

Bought mine from King AArthur Flour for $7 and I love it!.  Michael

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

so I had to have it sent to a NY address and my colleague kindly brought it back for me.  It's a great tool for mixing bread dough and now I've just realised that I can also use it for scone mixutres which is most helpful.  Would be perfect there's one that comes in a thicker easy-grip handle which helps make it less tiring for the hand as I find that I have to grip the slender handle very firmly when mixing.

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Jslouey


I would be very susprised if you couldnt get one made up in no time flat in some of those clever little tinkers stores in HK, now you have one from the states they would be able to copy it and you can corner the market.


kind regards yozza

rhtulis's picture
rhtulis

I have 2 that I bought from KA.  The handle of the first one began to split after a couple of uses.  KA's price is too high for what you get - I think that Breadtopia's price is more realistic.


I like it.  We don't have the storage space for a real mixer, and I only make 2 loaves at a time, so this tool is much better than using a heavy spoon.

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

when I came across the site for NKB.  I thought it was quite a neat gadget as soon a I saw this.  As much as I would love to have a mixer, my worktop is already cluttered with electrical appliances including a fp that I very seldom use.  Others have suggested using the fp for quick mixing of the dough and then knead by hand in the absence of a mixer, but for what it takes 10 secs to achieve, I spend 10 mins cleaning up, I thik I'm going to stick to the dough whisk.

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Now that's a wonderful idea.  They're experts when it comes to copying haha.  Now if only there were enough home bread makersin HK or suckers like me who'd pay to get this when they can very conveniently use their hands for the job.   


Regards,


Judy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

So Judy what types of bread are on offer in HK, i lived there as a baby and my sister was born there (LONG TIME AGO) i visited on a trip to the UK from AUS with my family but most of the breads were what was available at the hotel!


regards yozza

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

We have breads ranging from HK style buns to breads from Japanese bakeries and artisan breads that are be made by bakeries based in Shenzhen.  One large local bakery supplies the buns for McDonald's and they have a huge factory in China.  I have found the breads in HK are getting lighter and lighter because I believe they have added bread improvers or bread enhancers in order to use less flour and possibly to give it a longer shelf life.  There is a bakery called Pumpernickel that sells a huge variety of artisan breads but they are quite expensive. Here are some pics of breads that I have learnt to make that are popular here in HK:


Cocktail bun with a filling consisting of dessicated coconut and milk poweder filling. 


yozzause's picture
yozzause

The cocktail buns look very interesting Judy and from memory the breads are are a bit sweet too, or at least they were when i visited Singapore. I do like the chinese steamed buns too, especially if we go for yum cha here in Perth.


regards Yozza

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

don't they.  I recently learnt to make chinese steamed buns also and once you know the technique to making the dough for the buns, the options for the fillings are numerous.  I made those buns once at home but found them too sweet for my liking.


Judy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

So how about a steamed bun recipe Judy id love to have a go at an authentic dough


Kind regards Yozza

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

for best result use a bamboo steamer or else you may end up with soggy when the consdensation drops back onto the buns while steaming.


250 grm plain flour


1 level tsp instant yeast


100 ml warm water at approx 40C


45 grm sugar


2 tsp melted lard/Crisco (I used lard that comes in a block like butter)


1 level tsp baking powder


Mix yeast and 1/4 tsp of sugar in the warm water.


Sieve flour and baking powder onto work top and make a large well.  Pour sugar, yeast mixture and lard into well. Dissolve sugar by rubbing fingers in a circular movemnt without disburbing the flour.  When sugar is dissolved use a dough scraper to mix the water and flour and knead into a smooth silky dough.  Put in bag and leave to rise until dough has doubled. 


Turn out dough, knead gently and divide into 8 equal parts.  Shape into small balls and rest for 10 - 15 mins. 


Flatten each into a thin disc  using a smal rolling pin and wrap filling with the dough.  It's difficult for me to describe the technique to wrapping the buns though.


Steam over med. high heat making sure to remove lid quickly and cover again after 3 mins and continue for further 7 mins. 


Here's what the chi.buns look like, not the best looking buns but taste fine and edible.




Judy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Thanks Judy they look pretty good i will give them a go when i get this arm out of its sling regards yozza

sagharbormo's picture
sagharbormo

for strong doughs, like cookie doughs or adding ingredients like more liquids to a lean autolyzed dough, I use a potato masher, the kind with a series of u on the bottom is best. It works very well. The potato masher with holes on the flat bottom works too, but not as well imo.


I bought a dough whisk, but never use it any more as the potato masher is better.

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

or being argumentative, but on the contrary wouldn't a potato masher break the dough up rather than keeping the dough tog. to form a ball?

bnom's picture
bnom

If you have a flat whisk...the type that is used for making sauces, that works very well.  I use mine all the time and it has never bent and is easy to clean. Plus it's nice to have something that serves dual purpose.  


I did a post on this awhile back 


 


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17437/wonderful-breadmixing-tool-you-may-already-own