The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No-knead Baking Container

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colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

No-knead Baking Container

The NY Times no-knead recipe calls for a 6-8 quart baking container.  Is that size really necessary?  We don't have much storage space left in our kitchen, and I am reluctant to buy something that large if it is not needed.

My largest baking container with a lid is a 3-qt ceramic.

Colin

edh's picture
edh

Hi Colin,

The only covered bake-able pot I have is a 4 qt enameled pot and, for the most part, it has had more than sufficient space for the NYT no-knead. The only times the bread has hit the lid have been when I've done something random or unplanned, like adding a hefty dose of sourdough discards in addition to the full amount of flour and yeast. Gee, can't imagine why I ran out of room...

I'm not sure what a 3 qt looks like, in terms of size, but what the heck, I'd give it a try. Usually the loaf doesn't come to the top of mine, and that's with good oven spring.

Good luck; I sympathize with the desire to keep new toys to a minimum!

edh

colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

I was trying to figure out why such a large container was specified, and was wondering if having a volume of hot moist air between the cover and the top of the bread served some kind of baking function.

I should have stated that in my original post.

salishsea's picture
salishsea

I use the ceramic insert of a crockpot for this and it works perfectly.  This is easily the best and most consistent bread I bake, even being lackadaisical with the measurements (using volume rather than weight for example).

 

 

colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

No-KneadNo-Knead

Here is the result.  The crumb and texture were pretty.

The 3-qt baking container was barely large enough.  The dough was very wet.  Folding was very difficult, and forming it into a ball was a lost cause.  Next time I will use less water.

I worked it around on the countertop a little while, pretending to fold it, and pushed it onto a piece of parchment paper, which I then put into a large bowl for the second rise.  After 3 hours I started the oven, and put the dough into the baking dish, parchment paper included.  I baked it forf the 30 minutes with the cover on, and about 18 more minutes uncovered.

 Colin