The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

'routine' for daily baking

  • Pin It
MommaT's picture
MommaT

'routine' for daily baking

Hi,

Now that I've developed a very healthy and robust starter AND have mastered a couple breads that are favoured in our household, I'm trying to get myself into a routine for daily baking.  Why daily, you might ask?  Needless to say, my husband (and 7 y.o. son) have a penchant for extremely fresh bread.  If I make two loaves, e.g., the second one is consumed at a MUCH slower rate the second day.

Ideally, the bread would be ready for breakfast and for preparing school lunches in the morning.  Not wanting to get up at 3 to accomplish this, I'm wondering if anyone on TFL has developed their own routine for accomplishing the daily loaf.  I should also mention that we are partial, usually, to grainy loaves, so many of the recipes I use involve an overnight soaker.

My current approach: 

I am home during the day most days, so can accomplish the routine where I build my soaker and pre-ferment the night before and then work the rest of the magic throughout the day.  The trouble here is that if I bake the loaf before supper, someone invariably hacks into it while it is still warm (grrrrr!) and then there is none left for the next day.  I am working to time it so I bake the bread after the kids go to sleep, then let it cool overnight, because my attempts at behaviour modification have been futile....or else the smell of freshly baked bread is just too overpowering.

How do the rest of you out there do this?

What happens in a bakery that sets out fresh loaves at 6:30 or 7 am?  Are these all accomplished by insomniac bakers who start at 3 in the morning?  Or are there any other "tricks of the trade"?

Thanks! 

 MommaT

 

peartree's picture
peartree

Hi MommaT,

 I've got a similar situation - 4 small kids who could live on nothing but bread. I once found a loaf of bread in the middle of the kitchen table with a steak knife sticking out of it and a not inconsiderable amount of blood on it...

My routine is roughly this: poolish overnight, dough by midday, risings in the afternoon, shaping after supper, baking after bedtime. If you want it fresh in the morning, you could always shape your loaves the night before and refrigerate them. Most of the stuff I make just improves with a night in the fridge.

Deb

MommaT's picture
MommaT

Wow, Deb!  Four kids and baking bread -- I commend you!!  :-)

Thanks for the tip...sounds like similar to the routine I end up with accidentally.

Do you do this daily?

Thanks! 

MommaT, Novice Baker 

Marni's picture
Marni

This is the way to go. I use the same schedule, unless I'm not doing a soaker and then I can start while the kids are eating breakfast.  I feed my starter the night before for sourdough and can be baking at sometime between 10 and midnightthe next night. I bake bread at least twice a week most weeks.  Then there are the cookies etc...

Marni

peartree's picture
peartree

Hey MommaT,

I bake almost every day. We really DO eat LOTS of bread! It's mum's way of keeping sane...

Also, my exceedingly picky 4 year old doesn't know that "c-bread" contains half a pound of carrots, plus apples, in it, and "z-bread" is chock-a-block with zucchini. I'm pretty sure those are the only veggies he gets, so I'm motivated to keep baking.

Deb

Marni's picture
Marni

Are these recipes you can share?  Do you think I can get "c-bread"or "z-bread" past my twelve year old?  I'd love to try.  Thanks!

Marni

peartree's picture
peartree

Hi Marni,

This is adapted from "Ultimate Bread" by Eric Treuille and Ursula Ferrigno:

2 tsp dry yeast

1 1/4 cups (300 ml) water

3 1/2 cups (500g)  bread flour

2 tsp salt

1/2 lb (250g) cooked mashed carrots

1 apple, grated

1 Tbsp butter, melted

1 do 2 rises, make a big boule, and slash a big spiral on top. Bake about 45 mins at 400F. It's pretty moist, toasts up great, and if you do the spiral slash it looks like a groovy mountain. I'm going to try a pumpkin version soon. 

My 4 year old eats it without question.  My 6 year old thinks it's a cheese bread (because of the orange bits) and loves it, too.

Let me know if you want z-bread - that's just a zucchini loaf with chocolate chips and lots of sugar!

Deb

Marni's picture
Marni

Deb,

Thanks for posting the recipe, I might even get to it today.  I do need to do the usual baking today, so we'll see.  I'm going to use your pumpkin idea.  If my kids see any "orange bits" they won't go near it, but they like pumpkin breads and such.  Those are the sweet dessert type like your z-bread.

Thanks again,

Marni

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

I've taken to making up the dough after dinner, letting it rise, shaping it, and then placing it outside for a slow final rise overnight. With temperatures getting down into the low to mid 50s, it's pretty much perfect. By morning, when I wake up, it's ready to bake.

If its a panned loaf, I just pop it in the cold oven, turn it to 350 and let it bake for 55 minutes.

If it's a hearth loaf, I'm lucky enough to have an oven that I can set to turn on 1 hour before I get up. So the oven's ready and I just pop that sucker in there.

By the time my daughter's up, the bread is cool and ready to slice for sandwiches.

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

well to answer a small part of the question.  I ALLWAYS and i MEAN ALLWAYS started work between 10:00 AND 11:00 pm and i would finish between 9 and 10 the next morning. thats on a good day during the weekends and holidays i would...

start on 11:00 pm on november 22 go home about 5:PM on november 24. if i was lucky the place had a shower i could take a quick one and change into some clean whites about half way through.

so no sleep at night and no sleep during the day I guess that would be called insomniac PLUS.  and i did it for 25 years. I think its in the blood. even to this day i only get about 3 or 4 hours of sleep a per day and i dont seem, to need any more than that.