The Fresh Loaf

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San Joaquin Light Rye

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

San Joaquin Light Rye

San Joaquin Light Rye 1

San Joaquin Light Rye 1

San Joaquin Light Rye 2

San Joaquin Light Rye 2

San Joaquin Light Rye Crumb

San Joaquin Light Rye Crumb

 This bread evolved from Anis Bouabsa's formula for baguettes which he generously gave to Janedo when she visited his bakery in Paris. I have had fun applying Anis' long cold primary fermentation to variations on his baguette formula.

I have enjoyed the breads made with added sourdough starter and about 10% rye in particular.I have written about my pain de campagne made with these modifications. However, the second time I made it using a flour that absorbed more water, the crumb was less open. I decided to try the same formula but with a somewhat higher hydration. I added an additional 15 gms of water, boosting the hydration from 74% to 77%. This resulted in a dough of almost identical “feel” to the original dough made with the less absorbent flour.

Formula

Active starter                        100 gms

KAF French Style Flour           450 gms

Guisto's Rye Flour                    50 gms

Water                                    385 gms

Instant yeast                           1/4 tsp

Salt                                        10 gms

 The method I used was otherwise identical to that described before: (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/8454/pain-de-campagne )

Jane opined that this could no longer be called a “pain de campagne.” I'm not sure why, but I accept her authority in matters of French terminology. So, I am calling it “San Joaquin Light Rye.” I also am not sure what to call the shape of the loaf. Maybe it is “a stretch bâtard.” Or “an obese demi-baguette.” In “Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. II,” Julia Child pictured a French loaf shape called a “Jaco.” I have not heard of this shape otherwise, but it looks sort of like what I made today.

 If asked to describe the crust and crumb, I would say it is close enough to Nury's Light Rye that I would have difficulty telling which was which in a blind tasting. And that's not bad!

David 

 

Comments

Janedo's picture
Janedo

David,

Simply GORGEOUS! And I love the name. And the crust and crumb are perfect. I haven't had breakfast and I'd do anything to be able to grab one from the screen.

Just a confirmation, is the Guisto's rye whole rye? 

Jane 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I can always count on an enthusiastic review from you before breakfast. ;-)

The texture of the crumb is just like the Nury rye. It's really nice. The dough was just enough drier than Nury's to permit scoring. I am pretty happy with how that turned out.

BTW, I raised these loaves on a linen couche rather than on parchment. I really like the effect on the surface of the loaf. It's hard to describe, but it is different.

This was also the first time I used my new transfer peel. The one you made from a scrap of wood inspired me. Mine is made from a side panel from a case of 1975 Cos d'Estournel. Upscale scrap lumber, that.

Guisto's rye is a fine ground whole rye (organic). It is the one rye flour I can buy in bulk. I buy it in small quantities and keep it in a French canning jar in the freezer. I go through it fast enough so what I have is always fresh.


David

josordoni's picture
josordoni

Oh David you do make lovely bread... the scoring on these is so pretty.

you said:

I also am not sure what to call the shape of the loaf. Maybe it is “a stretch bâtard.” Or “an obese demi-baguette.” In “Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. II,” Julia Child pictured a French loaf shape called a “Jaco.” I have not heard of this shape otherwise, but it looks sort of like what I made today.

Well I think it looks like a fat batard..but I'm not sure if that is an insult to the poor bread !!!

Pablo's picture
Pablo

"fat batard" pretty funny.

:-∆aul

apprentice's picture
apprentice

I'm lost for words.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

That's what I would call them.   I would even buy a bread basket in that size so a whole loaf would fit snuggly into it.  "Pass the lovely long loaf, please."  

Mini O

josordoni's picture
josordoni

actually now I think about it, I don't reckon it would last long enough to be called anything other than "is there any more?"

 Lynne

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

Beautiful crumb. And very pretty crust. Well done!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

That means a lot to me. Your baking was inspirational and challenging to me when I first joined TFL.


David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


David

susanfnp's picture
susanfnp

 I'd call them batards. No, make that "stunningly beautiful gorgeous perfect batards." I'm interested in why Jane says this is not pain de campagne?

Susanfnp

http://www.wildyeastblog.com

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

 

a baton?

Beautiful bread, David

 

Larry 

 

Janedo's picture
Janedo

They look like bâtards to me!

Susan, to me it isn't a pain de campagne because if you buy one in a bakery it is usually made with yeast, it's lighter in texture, almost airy. It usually has a bit of rye or whole wheat. It is an extremely general term for a city bread that is trying to be a country bread. But any beautiful light rye sourdough to me deserves a name of it's own. See what I mean?

David, I sifted some of my whole rye and I've got Nury's light rye going.

Yah, those little pieces of wood are handy! I stock a bunch in my little drawer under the oven. I didn't realize until I read Leader that the bâtards were proofed in parchment. That's a good idea. I bought my couche cloth in Paris in another huge fabric store by the Marché Saint Pierre. €4,95 a meter. I got enough for my bannetons and two couches. It's great! I do the tranferring over the cloth so that after it's all done, I can just go outside and shake it out.

Jane 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Jane.

If that's your definition of "pain de campagne," what do you call a country bread trying to be a city bread?

I may make a spare transfer peel or two. My first was used for bread to go with a lamb daube of sorts, braised in Merlot. So the peel made from a case of St. Emillion was appropriate. I think I need to make another from a case of Montrachet. Hmmmm ... Ch. Montelena Chardonney is more likely.


David

cheesecake man's picture
cheesecake man

They look fantastic - bet they even taste better!!

Rick

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

enough is enough..you put us all to shame with your beautiful ryes!!

Betty

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm glad you like the way they look, but I would be seriously unhappy if anyone were shamed by what I have shared.

If it looks good, bake it. And enjoy!


David

paddyboomsticks's picture
paddyboomsticks

I do like the look of those....

As always, your beautiful 'blooms' leave me jealous. I can get that on some loaves, but not with the frightening regularity of your baking! 

Interestingly, I almost always get a good rise on my ryes...

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I've worked for that bloom!

It is from a combination of the factors that enhance oven spring (Hot oven, baking stone, good steaming early in the bake) and good scoring.

After going back and forth, I am now convinced that baking the loaves covered does improve oven spring and bloom. It's just that I don't have the equipment to cover more than one good sized boule at a time.

My scoring has improved with understanding the proper method, then practice, practice, practice. I feel it is still just coming together.

So, keep at it.


David

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Love the grigne!  

I'm jealous that you can get Giusto's.  Some years ago in Colorado I used Giusto's Old Mill flour.  I could no longer get it when we moved here.  I used a bread machine in Colorado and had no idea what I was doing, really, but I did use the dough cycle and Santa brought me a baking stone.  Anyway, the Old Mill flour is a reduced bran whole wheat flour - all the germ and 20% of the bran.  If you can get it you might play with that a little.

Now that I'm taking a break from my crash course I've got time to follow some of these really interesting posts.

Be seeing you...

:-∆aul

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Paul.

Whole Foods has several of Guisto's flours in bulk, but I've never seen "Old Mill" flour. From your description, it is a high extraction flour. I use that type a lot for rye breads and for miches. That flour is not listed on Guisto's web site that I've seen. Maybe they don't produce it any more?


David

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Hi David,

I am a persistent little cuss and I ran this one into the groud.  I've spoken the Giusto's in South City and I've spoken to distributors and I've whined at coops in Washington, which is a reasonable drive from here.  I can assure you that the flour is still milled and that it is available in California.

http://www.worldpantry.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ExecMacro/giustos/manufactflour.d2w/report#flourspecialty

item 107056

:-Paul

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Paul.

I found a whole array of interesting flours I never knew about under "Manufacturer & Food Service Info" on Giusto's web site. I've e-mailed them to see if I can order these directly.

I'm going to need to build an annex onto my walk-in pantry if I accumulate any more flours!

Anyway, I'll let you know if they respond.


David

Pablo's picture
Pablo

They're availabe by phone in South City as well.  They only sell to distributors, so it depends on who is the distributor to your local store and what they are willing to supply and what your store is willing to order for you.  If you have a store that handles Giusto's anything, seems like they'd have access to more of it.  Good luck.  I was very attached to that flour.

:-Paul