The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Trash 1 cup

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D33's picture
D33

Trash 1 cup

Can somebody explaine why I "need" to trash 1 cup of starter? I always use all that I take out unless I as just feeding my starter.

"DEE"

Yumarma's picture
Yumarma

If you can make use of the excess when you feed, then keep it and make your pancakes or muffins or whatever with it.

If you're bulking up your starter to add to a recipe (say you need 300g starter), you add enough water and flour (150g + 150g) to your regular starter (say, 50g) to get the amount for the recipe plus whatever you keep to refresh your mother starter. From that 350g, you drop 300g of it into your recipe and the extra 50g goes back into the normal starter routine.

I don't know where your "extra" cup would come into play. Who's telling you to "trash one cup"?

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Paul

MommaT's picture
MommaT

Hi,

In Dan Leader's Bread Alone, he recommends discarding 1 cup of starter as part of the maintenance routine.  My understanding, and the way I read this is necessary *IF* you have not used your starter for a week and you just need to feed it.  The reason would be, IMO, simply so you don't build up a humungous volume of starter in your refrigerator.   Something that is easy enough to do if you need it and probably too easy to do if you very infrequently use your starter.

Frankly, I am using from my starter 4+ times per week and so never have the need to "trash" any of it.  I just continue to bulk it up after each use.  Sometimes, I need to feed it a couple times to get up to the volume I need for my next baking.  And if I hanker for those delicious sourdough blueberry pancakes on the weekend, I often pull out a bit and build the pancake starter and my mother starter both up simultaneously, so as not to impact the near-daily baking required to satisfy my husband's penchant for extremely fresh bread.

Hope that helps!

 

MommaT, Novice Baker 

D33's picture
D33

Thank you sooo.. musch for the info. I also have found  that what you say is true. I really did not think that there was a necessary reason to discard 1 cup of starter. Again I thank you for your input! I did not throw out any starter this weekend and I baked 4 loves of bread. My DRS & friends were glad I dis not throw any starter out also. However, they had no idea the gift of bread was because I had sooo. much starter to use LOL. It worrked out for everyone.

Yes it helped!

"Dee" 

D33's picture
D33

Thank you sooo.. musch for the info. I also have found  that what you say is true. I really did not think that there was a necessary reason to discard 1 cup of starter. Again I thank you for your input! I did not throw out any starter this weekend and I baked 4 loves of bread. My DRS & friends were glad I dis not throw any starter out also. However, they had no idea the gift of bread was because I had sooo. much starter to use LOL. It worrked out for everyone.

Yes it helped!

"Dee" 

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

Most people don't bake very often, and a starter at room temperature needs to be fed (IMNSHO) twice a day, and each feeding should be enough to double it in size.

 

I find that people who feed their starter less often have a lot of information about how to revive starters and how to start starters.  I prefer to not need that information (though I have a lot of it from when I fed my starter once a day, or less.)

 

If you feed your starter twice a day, enough to double it each time, and you don't bake with it or discard it, in 10 days you'll have a home swimming pool full of starter.  In 14 days, you'll have an olympic sized pool full of starter.  And 12 hours later, you'll have two pools full of starter.

 

It's a bit wasteful to discard starter, but not nearly so wasteful as just doubling it and not using it.

 

I remove the starter from the main container and save it for other projects, such as quick breads, cakes, pizza shells and so on.

 

And I usually refrigerate my starter so I don't have to feed it twice a day.

 

Mike