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Michel Suas Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread - Advanced Bread and Pastry

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holds99's picture
holds99

Michel Suas Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread - Advanced Bread and Pastry

 Today I made Michel Suas' Sourdough Whole Wheat Bread from his book Advanced Bread and Pastry.  I was pleased with the results.  Although Mr. Suas book is written primarily for the professional baker his book is an amazing book, which covers both bread and pastry with an interesting history of bread making and many photos, illustrations and much detail re: techniques.Howard - St. Augustine, FL

Michel Suas Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread - Advanced Bread and Pastry:

Today I made Michel Suas' Sourdough Whole Wheat Bread from his book Advanced Bread and Pastry.  I was pleased with the results.  Although Mr. Suas' book is written primarily for the professional baker his book is an amazing book, which covers both bread and pastry with an interesting history of bread making and many photos, illustrations and much detail re: techniques.

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Howard.

Those look very nice. I need to look at the recipe. (I have the book.) I'm still in search of a sourdough whole wheat bread I love. The combination of whole wheat and sour flavors may just not work for me.


David

holds99's picture
holds99

If you try it you might consider cutting back 25% on salt.  It isn't noticeable enough to be unpleasant, I just prefer less salt.  He calls for 2.53% salt (baker's %) for the final dough mixture.  I doubled his test recipe and made 2 loaves (4 lbs of dough).  His measurements are right-on. 

His recipe also calls for a slight amount of yeast in the final dough (1/8 tsp. per 2 lbs. of dough).  So, it isn't "pure" sourdough, but it is quite good tasting and the dough has that "good" feel to it that you get when the hydration is right.  Just tacky enough to be able to work with it but not so wet it sticks to hands and work surface.  I mixed the water with the flour for the final dough (on low with my KA) for a few minutes and did a 20 min. autolyse of the final dough before adding the levain and salt and did the remaining mixing by hand with 3 stretch and folds at 20 min. intervals before putting it in the fridge and retarding it overnight. 

Howard

dougal's picture
dougal

David, this formula is on page 210.

You'll note that

- its a "sourdough" titled formula that uses yeast

and

- its a "whole wheat" titled formula that uses 52% white flour and only 47% whole wheat...

 

Doesn't stop it being a nice loaf... but a bit disappointing to both "whole wheat" and "sourdough" enthusiasts.

Janedo's picture
Janedo

Oh no! Another great book to buy? That's a few people who have spoken about it recently and since I adore making cakes and pastries as well, it might just have to go on my wish list.

Your bread looks wonderful, Howard. I'm not a fan of lots of salt in bread. Why do you think he did 2,53% salt... that is way over the recommended 1,8%. If it is to slow the yeast action, why not just put less yeast? Or because the whole wheat is so powerful tasting? Just suppositions.

Jane 

dougal's picture
dougal

Jane its only 2.53% of the flour being added as flour to the final dough. (Ignoring the levain.)

 

Consider the flour in the levain, and the flour in the "stiff starter" that goes into the levain. and it comes out, as per my post above, to 1.98% of the total flour

 

EDIT - not above, but on one of Howard's other threads on this bread...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/8532/michel-suas-whole-wheat-sourdough-bread-advanced-bread-and-pastry#comment-43750  

Kuret's picture
Kuret

looking good, definately reminds me of my results using the same dough, I often skip the yeast as I think that it is mainly added to ensure rise with a commercial bakin schelude.

I dont´t find it too salty though, maybe I am accustomed to salty bread? Or salty foods for that matter.

holds99's picture
holds99

Good point re: the yeast being added as insurance to make sure it rises within time frames of a commercial baking schedule/environment.  I will take your suggestion and skip the yeast next go round and see if there's a discernable difference.

I really didn't think it was too salty but my wife thought it could use less salt.   

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

Kuret's picture
Kuret

Might make a batch of these next weekend, maybe. But I have promised to bake some swedish style loaves for my baking blog so they might be postponed. Incredible bread though! I really like part WW´s better than crumbly 100% WW.

Also im getting bannetons from Brotformen.de to proof in. So now I have 6 of them! Time to start a business?

kanin's picture
kanin

Nice loaves (and bannetons).

Try the 100% WW multigrain, too. It's one of my regular bakes.

 

http://www.applepiepatispate.com

holds99's picture
holds99

This was my first time baking from Mr. Suas book.  I will try the 100% WW multigrain.  WW is my favorite bread.  I have WW flour that I order from Cable Mill in the Great Smokey Mountains, which is terrific flour.  Cable Mill a very old water mill in Tennessee. 

Howard - St. Augustine, FL