The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pain de Campagne

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Pain de Campagne

Pain_de_CampagneBatard

Pain_de_CampagneBatard

Pain_de_CampagneGrigne

Pain_de_CampagneGrigne 

Pain_de_CampagneCrumb

Pain_de_CampagneCrumb 

The formula for this bâtard is derived from that for Anis Bouabsa's baguettes, as shared with TFL by Janedo. Jane prompted me to add some sourdough starter, and this resulted in a big improvement, to my taste. We had also discussed adding some rye flour to the dough. Jane said she and her family really liked the result. The addition of rye and sourdough makes this more like a pain de campagne, which is traditionally shaped as a boule or  bâtard. The result of my mental meandering follows:

 

Formula

Active starter ........................100 gms

KAF French Style Flour.......450 gms

Guisto's Rye Flour..................50 gms

Water......................................370 gms

Instant yeast............................1/4 tsp

Salt............................................10 gms

 

Mixing

In a large bowl, mix the active starter with the water to dissolve it. Add the flours and stir to form a shaggy mass. Cover tightly and let rest (autolyse) for 20 minutes.

Sprinkle the yeast over the dough and mix with a plastic scraper. Then sprinkle the salt over the dough and mix.

Using the plastic scraper, stretch and fold the dough 20 times, rotating the bowl 1/5 turn between each stroke. Cover tightly. Repeat this stretch and fold procedure 20 minutes later and, again, after another 20 minutes.

 

Fermentation

After the third series of stretches and folds, scape the dough into a lightly oiled 2 quart/2 liter container and cover tightly. (I use a 2 quart glass measuring pitcher with a tightly fitting plastic lid manufactured by Anchor Glass.) Immediately place in the refrigerator and leave it there for 21 hours. (In this time, my dough doubles in volume and is full of bubbles. YMMV.)

 

Dividing and Shaping

(I chose to make one very large bâtard, but you could divide the dough into 2 or 3 pieces and make smaller bâtards, boules or baguettes. Or, you could just cut the dough and not shape it further to make pains rustiques.)

Take the dough out of the refrigerator and scrape it gently onto a lightly floured work surface. Gently pat it into a rectangle. To pre-shape for  a bâtard, fold the near edge up just past the center of the dough and seal the edge by gently pressing the two layers together with the ulnar (little finger) edge of your hand or the heel of your hand, whichever works best for you. Then, bring the far edge of the dough gently just over the sealed edge and seal the new seam as described.

Cover the dough with plastic wrap and/or a kitchen towel and let it rest for 30-60 minutes, with the seams facing up. (The time will depend on ambient temperature and how active your starter is. The dough should have risen slightly, but not much.)

To shape a bâtard, fold the near edge of the dough and seal the edge, as before. Now, take the far edge of the dough and bring it towards you all the way to the work surface and seal the seam with the heel of your hand. Rotate the loaf gently toward you 1/4 turn so the last seam you formed is against the work surface and roll the loaf back and forth, with minimal downward pressure, to further seal the seam. Then, with the palms of both hands resting softly on the loaf, roll it back and forth to shape a bâtard. Start with both hands in the middle of the loaf and move them outward as you roll the loaf, slightly increasing the pressure as you move outward, so the bâtard ends up with the middle highest and the ends pointed .

 

Preheating the oven

Place a baking stone on the middle rack and both a cast iron skillet and a metal loaf pan (or equivalent receptacles of your choosing) on the bottom shelf.  Heat the oven to 500F. (I like to pre-heat the baking stone for an hour. I think I get better oven spring. Since I expected a 30 minute rest after pre-shaping and a 45 minute proofing, I turned on the oven 15 minutes after I had pre-shaped the loaf.) I put a kettle of water to boil 10 minutes before baking.

 

Proofing

After shaping the loaf, transfer it to parchment paper liberally dusted with semolina. Cover the loaf with plastic wrap and/or a kitchen towel. Proof until the loaf has expanded to about 1-1/2 times it's original size. (This turned out to be 30 minutes for me.) Do not over-proof, if you want good oven-spring and bloom!

 

Baking

Put about a cup full of ice cubes in the loaf pan on the bottom shelf of the oven and close the door.

Slip a peel or cookie sheet under the parchment paper holding the loaf. Uncover the loaf. Score it. (The bâtard was scored with a serrated tomato knife. The knife was held with its blade at about a 30 degree angle to the surface of the loaf. One swift end-to-end cut was made, about 1/2 inch deep.)

Transfer the loaf and parchment paper to the baking stone, pour one cup of boiling water into the skillet, and close the oven door. Turn the oven down to 460F.

After 15 minutes, remove the loaf pan and the skillet from the oven. Rotate the loaf 180 degrees, if it is browning unevenly. Close the oven door.

Bake for another 15 minutes, then remove the loaf and place on a cooling rack. Check for doneness. (Nice crust color. Internal temperature of at least 205F. Hollow sound when you thump the bottom of the loaf.) If necessary, return to loaf to the oven to bake longer.

 

Cooling

Cool on a rack for two hours before slicing.

 

Comments

I got very good oven spring and bloom. This loaf has an ear by which you could carry it around. It sang to me while cooling. The crust is nice and crunchy. The crumb is well aerated and almost "fluffy" in texture, but with tender chewiness. The taste is just plain good. It is minimally sour. Based on my half-vast experience, I'd say it is fairly representative of a French Pain de Campagne, the major difference being that it is less dense than the ones I recall. 

 This is, for me, not merely a good "novelty" bread. It could join San Francisco Sourdough and Jewish Sour Rye as an "everyday" bread I would enjoy having all the time.  The method is good for those of us who work outside the home. It can be mixed in the evening and baked in time for a late dinner the next night. 

 

Enjoy!

 David 

Comments

pigreyhound's picture
pigreyhound

Your bread is beautiful! I aspire to have such great looking bread someday!!

 

So, I have a question about the active starter. (And please be patient if this is obvious, I am new and tend to go by the book at this point.) You said you mixed it with water. Was it a dry starter or did you add a portion of sourdough starter to the water?

 

EDITED: So after reading the other comments and your responses, I now know this was an active sourdough starter (revived and ready to go).  So, I guess I wasn't aware that I should add water to the starter prior to adding the flour.  Goodness, learning a new skill is very hard!! 

Thank you for the help.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, pigreyhound.

Not a "dumb question" at all.

Adding the starter to the water this way is not a matter of "should." Some formulas have you first mix the flour and water in the formula and let it rest a while before adding the starter and the salt. Some formulas have you add the starter at the same time as the flour and water, especially if it a liquid starter.

The advantage of the technique I described is that it is the easiest way to disperse the starter evenly. Adding the starter after the water and flour are mixed makes it harder to mix the starter into the dough so it is spread evenly. So, this is a matter of what's easiest. That's all.


David

pigreyhound's picture
pigreyhound

Thank you so much for your help! It makes a lot of sense to add a wet starter to the water first. I haven't seen a recipe asking me to add the starter to water. But typically I am using solid starters like bigas or poolish.

 

I appreciate your patience!

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, pigreyhound.

You are welcome! Happy to help.

Dissolving the starter in the water as a first step in mixing a sourdough dough is a technique I read in Daniel Leader's "Local Breads." Just to clarify: It works for a firm or a liquid starter.

The issue I mentioned has to do with the autolyse technique which is mixing the flour and water and letting it rest for 15-60 minutes to hydrate the flour and start gluten development before adding the salt and leavening. The question is about adding the yeast or sourdough starter to the autolyse or holding it back and adding it at the same time as the salt.

There is some disagreement about this. My conclusion is that you add a liquid levain or a poolish to the autolyse, because they contain a significant proportion of the total water in the dough. You add more dough-like preferments like pâte fermenté or firm levain after the autolyse. You can add instant yeast when you mix the autolyse, but you should add fresh yeast after the autolyse.

Whew!

TMI?


David

obrien1984's picture
obrien1984

David,

Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. It is literally the best "French-ish" bread recipe I have ever used. With it, I achieved in one try the crust and crumb I have been seeking for years. I have made this bread at least 10 times since I first read it. Whereas I usually bake once a week, this recipe was so delicious that I made it three or four times a week. 

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Joseph

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Joseph.

I am delighted the pain de campagne is working for you!

I am thinking about making it again myself this weekend, probably in a boule this time. And I may try it with WW flour, as you did. Or maybe some high extraction flour.


David

obrien1984's picture
obrien1984

I originally had trouble with the dough being very sticky. I think it was due to the rye flour. I substituted whole wheat for the rye, and found it to be much more manageable.

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Hello

I am just a beginner bread baker, and had to show up to share my success with you....

 

I have been keeping a sourdough starter for 7 months, and decided to try your recipe with it. My loaf is not as gorgeous as yours, but.... it turned out SO good!

 

if anyone wants to see photos, here they are

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/79167445@N00/sets/72157607730955556/

 

thank you!!!!!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Sally.

I'm happy you liked it. I appreciate your letting me know about your success. Your crumb looks marvelous!

I made this bread again myself yesterday. Rather than 50 gms of rye, I used 25 gms of whole wheat flour and 25 gms of rye. I think I liked it even better than the original, but I often find whatever I've just baked is my "favorite."

If you haven't seen it, look at:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/8971/san-joaquin-sourdough


David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I am tickled that this formula has been picked up by at least two other bread blogs since Jane wrote it up for her own blog. (http://aulevain.canalblog.com/archives/2008/09/07/10493009.html)

See:

http://bonheursdottoki.canalblog.com/archives/2008/10/05/10829345.html

and

http://www.stirthepots.com/2008/09/index.html (Scroll down to the September 8, 2008 entry.)


David

Ottoki's picture
Ottoki

Thank you David, this bread is really excellent and I still classify it among my preferred… See you soon for new receipts !
Ottoki.

My blog > clic here > Aux Petits Bonheurs d'Ottoki

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I am so happy you like the pain de campagne!

If I read your blog entry correctly, you mixed the dough in a bread machine and baked the loaf in a casserole (cocotte). Is that correct?


David

Ottoki's picture
Ottoki

Exactly, David ! It's that I do ! My family and me like this bread and I do it again, very very soon !

BYE ALP...and Thanks again David !

Ottoki (or "Tokinette")

md_massimino's picture
md_massimino

I just made this bread and it came out pretty good:



Great crumb and crust, only nominal sourdough taste.  As you can see from the pic, it's a misshapen loaf.  The dough was so wet that I couldn't get it to hold the batard shape.  I'm pretty sure it was because of the flour I used, just looking for some input to back up this assumption. 


I haven't found a wide selection of flours anywhere close to home yet, it's been a struggle to find rye let alone french style flour.  I used all purpose flour and substituted whole wheat for the rye called for in the recipe. I'm guessing these two flours a little more thirsty, thoughts?  Do you guys end up ordering direct from KAF to get some of the more specialty types?


I just found a store that carries rye flour so I bought a bunch to make a rye sourdough starter, maybe I'll give this one more go next weekend.  My wife is begging me to slow down with the baking, I guess it's hard to start the new year diet when the house is full of fresh bread.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I can get rye flour from several mills in local stores. The other special flours, I do order from KAF.


I would encourage you to work on adapting your hydration to the differences among flours. I say "work on" because it's a skill that only comes with considerable experience, but it's well worth cultivating.


David

md_massimino's picture
md_massimino

Thanks for the advice, I appreciate it.  Each batch gets a little closer, at least these latest ones are edible and are starting to at least kinda resemble the pictures.  If you squint.

bakermomof4's picture
bakermomof4

Have you tried this with all starter and no instant yeast?


Thought I better try this one since you named it after the area where I am from.


Thanks

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, bakermomof4.


The only difference in making this bread without instant yeast would be a longer bulk fermentation time and proofing time. That's okay, as long as you watch the dough and not the clock. It might taste even better from the long, slow fermentation.


Let us know how it works for you!


Where are you from in the Central Valley?


David

bakermomof4's picture
bakermomof4

Thanks for the response. I went ahead and tried your version with the yeast. I used 100% hydration rye starter, and for the flour I used half unbleached AP and half white bread flour - the reason for this is that is what I have been using while trying other recipes and wanted to see how this one compared.


I mixed and folded as instructed and put in refrigerator for the 21 hours. I ended up not being home yesterday so it ended up being 29 hours when I checked it and there had not been much rise in the refrigerator as you say you have, so that was at 11pm last night and I took the bowl out of the refrigerator and left on the counter overnight thinking that if it still hadn't done anything by morning I would toss it and start over. Well when I checked it this morning around 8am it had become very active and had large bubbles all over so I turned it out on floured counter, cut in two pieces, let it rest 20 min, shaped it into two boules, let proof for about an hour. Baked as you directed and it had incredible oven spring and was probably one of the best tasting I have made. Next time I am going to try without the instant yeast and see what the outcome is to compare. Thanks!


As for where in the Central Valley - originally from Tulare but now in Exeter.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I am impressed that you got such good results. You must have had a remarkable recipe! ;-) Not to mention good technique.


I often have little dough rising during the bulk fermentation in the fridge. The last time I made this, I mixed with 80F water and got about 50% expansion during the first hour or so in the Fridge. I'm not sure it made much difference in the bread. This recipe always turns out well for me.


But then, almost everything grows well in our valley, doesn't it?


David

bakermomof4's picture
bakermomof4

I made this recipe again with rye starter and for the flour this time I used all whole wheat, and once again it turned out great!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Did you add extra water to keep the dough slack?


David

bakermomof4's picture
bakermomof4

yes I only put in about 450-475g of flour and a little extra water.

rryan's picture
rryan

David...


Thank you for a wonderful bread formula.  I baked this yesterday, and the flavor is absolutely marvelous.  The rye flour and long, cold fermentation really created a depth of flavor that I have not had in any of my previous breads.


I used 450 gms KA Artisan flour and 50 gms organic rye flour from my local co-op, and baked it exactly according to your directions.  The crust is the most beautiful I of any bread that I have baked without a cloche, and the crumb is my best yet. I baked to an internal temperature of 210 F on unglazed quarry tiles.


My scoring, however, didn't result in a ear, although I tried to score at about a 30 degree angle with my homemade lame (razor blade and coffee stir-stick).  Yours was so beautiful, I am almost embarrassed with mine!  Oh well.....


TFL is a great help, and full of inspiring bread formulas.  And I always like to follow your posts.





---Bob

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

This a got to be one of my new favorite breads, David. I've made it twice now both times with outstanding results. Plus it is so very easy to put together in terms of time, ingredients, etc.


Thanks for posting it.


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm so happy you enjoy it! I also like the fact I can make the dough in the evening and bake for the next night's dinner. It's easy to fit into a busy life.


I have dough in the fridge to bake this afternoon. I made this batch with 10% KAF Organic White Whole Wheat instead of the rye. I made a 75% hydration dough that is quite slack. I added one stretch and fold on the bench after the first hour of cold retardation. I'm thinking of shaping boules this time.


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I'm totally hooked on using 10% rye (home-ground) and Guisto's Baker's Choice. That flour is amazing!


You are so right about it being such an easy bread no matter whether what your situation!


I have to say that this bread beads Hamelman's Vermont SD hands down! Maybe it is the flour. I don't know.


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Pamela.


Fortunately, we can bake them both. :-)


I generally prefer the open crumb and texture of the San Joaquin Sourdough, but sometimes I get a craving for a 65-68% hydration-type sourdough, and I go to either the Vermont SD (usually SusanFNP's version), one of Susan from San Diego's wonderful breads or Reinhart's SF SD from "C&C." I just love having choices.


Two other thoughts: First, I now make nearly all my "white" breads with 10-15% either WWW or rye - sometimes both. So, if you like the flavor, go for it! Second, I'm glad you like what rye does to breads made with AP/Bread flour. I do too. You might also like to try WWW, if you haven't. (I can't remember at the moment.) They both add another layer of depth to the flavor without giving an identifiable flavor of their own. I really wonder if it's mostly the additional minerals.


David

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Hi David,


Loved your pics and description of this bread, so duly queued it up on my always-too-long list of must-trys, only to promote it to the front on whim - ah, the luxury of the amateur artisanal home baker!


I decided not to spike mine with dry yeast, but did adjust the starter quantity up to 130gm, and modded the flour and water in the dough to maintain your hydration specifications. I also changed the proofing times to more closely resemble those I usually apply to pure sourdough breads, and tweaked the oven temperature during the baking to end up with a lighter coloured crust than yours (just my personal preference...I know that darker crusts often speak more eloquently to refined palates, but I still prefer a golden finish). So, all in all, a combination of educated guesswork and luck, I confess, but it couldn't have worked out better.


What a wonderful bread! This is an instant favourite, and incidentally, the first time I've tried batards. I've baked an average of 3 different (mostly) breads or other SD concoctions per week for the last 7 months or so, but don't have couches, bannetons or any other mould, and had confined my shapes to boules, freeform elongated boules (a contradiction, I know - more eliptical and bigger than batards, whatever you call that), ciabattas and occasionally pan bread. So, your batard shaping description was invaluable, and along with a Reinhart video and picture demos from my Dan Lepard and Maggie Glezer books, informed the mental rehearsals I practised with prior to trying the real thing. As you'll note, the result was decidedly "rustic" but still VERY pleasing to my novice eyes.


The flavour was great, and I noticed this bread stays reasonably moist over days, and continues to develop. Am planning on an encore performance very soon.


Thanks for your post, and for all your posts - you're one of the forum stars I always read, and whose recipes I often follow up on.


 




NB: The crumb shot is of an early slice and doesn't give a true indication of the extent of the spring; the middle slices were less squat.


 


Cheers!


Ross


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You may have noted that my OP was made over a year ago. Of late, I most often make this bread without the added yeast too.


I'm glad you enjoyed the bread. It remains one of my favorites. 


And thanks for your kind words!


David

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