The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Night time rye and early morning WW's

Kuret's picture
Kuret

Night time rye and early morning WW's

Yesterday i decided to make two batches of bread, one jewish rye style bread and also the standard SFBI WW sourdough. When preparing the rye bread I made a big mistake and used a formula that I had written down wich was way off the original formula. This one contained 75% prefermented flour, giving me a dough with absolutley no structure. However I managed to have it hold together using heavy flouring and S&F manouvres, the end result however was very flat but tasty rye bread.

Ugly rey bread

The colors are way off due to a bad camera, in reality the bread is light brown in the slashes and wery floury white all over.

I also made two loaves of WW bread from the SFBI advanced bread and pastries book, I first made 1000g of dough and then divided into two pieces and kneaded in some cut up figs in one of them. I let these two small doughs ferment overnight in my fridge. As I love the taste of sesame seeds I decided to roll the fig loaf in them wich gave it a very appealing look.



The colors on this one is off too, but I hope you get a decent idea of how the bread might look in person.

The formula for the WW bread is as follows:

Starter: 67g sourdough (50% H) + 42g water + 70g AP flour + 10g WW flour + 5g rye flour Let this ferment until you feel its ready, dependinggreaty on the speed of your culture.

Final dough: Starter + 183g bread flour + 275g WW flour + 350g water + 12g salt + 110g dried figs cut into small pieces (roughly 6 figs)

1 hour before preparing the final dough; cut the figs into small pieces about the size of raisins and put them in water to soak. When making the final dough pour off the water from the figs and use this as water in the dough if you want to increase the fig flavour. Mix the dough without the figs until its almost done. Now you have a choice of either incorporating the figs using your machine or incorporating them using a folding type method. I prefer folding but this may led to unevenly distributed figs inside the bread.

After incorporating the figs you should have a firm dough wich easily ruptures if the figs get too close to the surface, don´t worry though this can be remedied later. Let the dough ferment for ½h and then put in you refrigerator. I left it there for 11h, and also an additional ½h in room temperature prior to shaping.

Preheat your oven to 480f, divide your dough into 550 g pieces and preshape trying not to break the skin of the dough with any fig pieces surfacing. When shaping your dough try not to use to much flour as this will result in difficulties when you try to coat the bread in sesame seeds, after shaping roll the loaves in sesame seeds and then proof in brotforms or similar "mock up" (bread pan lined with cloth) for 45minutes. The sesame seeds helps the skin of the dough as they are preventing sticking, also due to how I incorporate the figs there is usually dough skin underneath the figs too so therefore the structure does not get too disturbed by breakage as long as it does not end up in sticktion.

Bake the bread at 480 for 10 minutes steaming rigorously at the beginning of the bake, then lower temp to 440f for five minutes and then 400 until the loaves are done, they will brown quite a lot due to the sugars from the fig-water that is the reason for the lower temperature. After the bread is done leave it in the oven for 10 more minutes with the door open and the heating turned off.