The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Attempting to make Semolina Sandwich bread with Semolina flour

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lioness7's picture
lioness7

Attempting to make Semolina Sandwich bread with Semolina flour

Hello out there,

Can the person who produced that beautiful loaf of semolina sandwich bread bless me with their expertise or someone who has baked it since then and had the same results.

I've purchased some semolina flour from my local Wholefoods market but  in reading the receipe, I'm confused because it says something about  using durum flour.

Please instruct me.

ALSO THIS NEXT QUESTION IS FOR SOMEONE WHO KNOWS ABOUT SPRING WHEAT BREAD FLOUR.

PURCHASED SOME AND WANT TO KNOW ITS TEMPERMENT AND HOW TO USE IT CORRECTLY AND A RECIPE WOULD BE NICE AS WELL.

AM I ASKING TOO MUCH! LOL

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Lioness7.

I am not the person who made the semolina sandwich loaf to which I think you are referring, but, since no one else has responded. I'll answer your questions best I can.

I have made 3 or 4 different semolina breads. Some recipes call for semolina flour. Some call for durum flour. Some call for durum but say you can use semolina. Some say you must use durum.

Durum wheat is a very hard, high protein wheat. It is a very old variety. It is used in macaroni products. Semolina is durum wheat coarsely ground. Durum flour is durum wheat finely ground.

I have only recently made bread with durum flour, which I have never found locally. I used it in a recipe I'd not made before, so there were no doubt other variables. That said, the bread was more tender and less chewy than the breads I'd made with semolina. I don't know that the flavor was any different.

My current sense is that you can use semolina in most recipes that call for durum flour, but the result will be different. I suppose if a recipe said you should absolutely only use durum flour, I'd hesitate substituting.

I have seen some folks put semolina in a blender or food processor and produce a finer ground flour that, I guess, is more like durum. I'd worry about the effect of the heat on the flour. I have no experience with this trick.

I hope that helps some.


David