The Fresh Loaf

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whole grain book recommendation?

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Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

whole grain book recommendation?

I think I need a whole grain book.

I have no clue what to get. The books I currently have are Reinhart's BBA and Beranbaum's Bread Bible.

I was wondering about King Arthur Flour Whole Grains Book or even Reinhart's. Or any other suggestions other people have?

And yes, I did busy myself searching but oh...I'm sooo confused. I don't know if I can afford both but who knows.

I haven't even really started using Beranbaum's Bible yet so...I'm a veritable newbie.

 maybe i should get this (laurel's kitchen)

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I'm not sure if her books are still in print, but she's got at least one great whole grain cookbook that I use a lot.  And I've looked at the King Arthur Whole Grain cookbook from the library, and I wouldn't mind having that one too.

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

i found these on amazon

some look nice, some look new

Kuret's picture
Kuret

Actually i think that your choice should be based on the percentage of wholegrain you want to use in your doughs. Essentially Reinhart is aiming for 100% wholegrain but supplies you with 50% variations while the KAF book is aimed at providing 50% wholegrain recipies.

So think a bit about whatyou want from the book and it shouldn't be that hard.

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

thanks. i guess i never thought about it that way.

theoretically i wouldn't mind 100% but...in practise, i'm not so sure. also, i would have to wonder about some ingredients (if i get them here)

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

The KAF book (which I have) is excellent.  It is more than just a bread book, since in includes recipes for cookies, cakes, crackers, bars, etc.  Measurements are given in volume and weight (ounces).

The Beatrice Ojakangas book, which I also have, is also good.  I like that she gives three different sizes for each recipe; that way you don't have to guesstimate how much to adjust for a larger or smaller pan.  She gives her measurements in volumes only.  While some of her breads can be baked hearth-style, she leans more toward panned loaves.  She also gives directions for mixing by hand, by mixer, by food processor or by bread machine.  You may love that, or it may drive you nuts.  She gives a nod to sourdough, but most of her recipes are yeasted.

Reinhart's book is still on my wish list.

PMcCool

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

thanks for the further pointer to Ojakangas

Which one do you all mean, by machine or hand or this?

karladiane's picture
karladiane

Hi there:

I just got "Local Breads" by Daniel Leader, and although it isn't specifically a whole grain cookbook, many of the recipes use different whole grains. It also has one of the best and most rational treatments of sourdough that I have seen, and he also has information about baking with unusual flours, like spelt or soy flours. The breads have been inspired by his trips to France, Italy, and Eastern Europe. Hence, I'm looking forward to trying many of the hearty breads from Poland, Germany and the Czech republic.

 

 

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

i think i really  like this place....even if you all make my to buy book list even longer!

KelleyAnn11's picture
KelleyAnn11

I really love PR WWB. I find all the recipes deliever maxium flavor and texture from whole grains. However, I also have Beatrice Ojakangas' book and use it often. The recipes take a lot less time start to finish so your planning doesn't have to be as good. But if you were just going to get one, I'd go for PR's because he also spends a lot more time explaining methods and theories so you get a bit of education as well.

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

well I want Reinhart's but I wouldn't mind one that needs sooo much planning.

This Day's picture
This Day

The Book of Bread is authored by Judith & Evan Jones.  Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book recipes use only 100% whole grain; the Book of Bread has a variety of recipes, some of which include whole grains.  Both books have good instructional text, particularly Laurel's Kitchen.  Be careful if you order Laurel's; there's also an earlier cookbook titled "Laurel's Kitchen" which is not limited to bread recipes.  If your public library has a good selection of bread books you could check out several for test runs before you buy.  Many libraries welcome their users' suggestions for new books.  You could suggest one or two bread books.

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

There's no public library here...no good system anywayz.

So I buy and hope :)

 is this the Laurel's Kitchen book you mean? 

shakleford's picture
shakleford

I'm also a big fan of both Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads and the Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book, at least if you're looking to make 100% whole-grain breads.  I would consider Reinhart's book the more indispensable of the two, but Laurel has the wider variety of recipes (I just made her black bean raisin bread, which was quite tasty).

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

thank you for your input. i wonder if i could afford both...(i just sprung my money on a scale..yay!)

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

I second shakleford's recommendation.  These are the two best.  Laurel's book is, I think, the sine qua non of whole-grain bread baking (refined flour is not mentioned at all).  Reinhart, who was influenced by Laurel, updates her methods, but, as has been mentioned, does have a few half-and-half breads.

Here's another book that I don't think anyone else has mentioned.  Susan Jane Chaney's Breadtime (Chaney once of the Moosewood Restaurant).  It doesn't tout itself as whole grain, but it is.  Quantities are all volumes, no weights.  A good whole-grain bread library addition if you can find it.

Rosalie

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

thank you for another book!

so, if a book is all volumes, i can easily convert it to weights? with regular formulae?

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

I grind my own flour.  If recipes gave the flour quantities in weights, then I could just weigh out that quantity of grain. 

There are conversion factors, but with flours there are questions.  Like did the recipe designer lightly spoon out the flour into the measuring cup or just scoop it in.  The actual quantity of flour varies quite a bit depending on the method.  Sometimes the author tells you, and sometimes he/she doesn't.

When I grind my flour with only a volume measurement of flour to go by, I figure about 150 grams per cup, on the high side.  Then when I mix up the dough I go by the feel.

Rosalie

kanin's picture
kanin

I highly recommend Reinhart's WGB book not only because it has 100% formulas, but because the baking schedule works really nicely even for a busy weeknight (once the biga and soaker are done). It's a great process that yields excellent results.

 

 

http://www.applepiepatispate.com

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

thanks!

bshuval's picture
bshuval

There are two more books I'd like to recommend. 

First, one of my favorite books, is Andrew Whitley's excellent "Bread Matters". While this book does not deal solely with whole grain breads, many of the breads contain high proportions of whole grains and/or can easily be adapted to be whole grain breads. This is a very well rounded book, with bread recipes from sourdough to sweet breads to gluten free breads (His treatment of sourdough rye breads, for example, is exceptional. His sourdough rye bread recipe is fantastic). This book is also fun to read. The recipes are given in a very friendly, chatty, manner rather than step-by-step instructions. This may not fit everyone. Still, I found all the recipes to be extremely precise and easy to follow. Unfortunately, this book is not available in the US, and must be mail-ordered from England. 

Another excellent whole grain book (this time from Australia) is John Downes's book on bread. It is a small volume, but it has fantastic recipes. The book is called "Natural Tucker Bread Book".  It has a large number of whole grain bread recipes (as well as some not-whole-grain). Of the more or less 60 recipes in the book (I don't have it with me at the moment), about a third a sourdough. About another third are yeast-leavened. Then there are a few unleavened breads and a few other interesting breads. The first half of the book deals with the author's approach to bread baking, with detailed instructions. The second half is full of bread recipes. A word of warnin, though: the author assumes you have read the first part, and most of the recipes are very concise (some a mere list of ingredients and one sentence of instructions). 

I heartily recommend both books. I've baked a bit from both and have been extremely pleased with the results. 

My bread blog: http://grainpower.wordpress.com

dougal's picture
dougal

Quote:
I think I need a whole grain book.

I have no clue what to get. The books I currently have are Reinhart's BBA and Beranbaum's Bread Bible.

OK first thing is to ask yourself "why" you think you need a "whole grain book". That answer ought to point you in a specific direction.

Reinhart's WGB is very largely explaining and exploiting a single specific novel technique to allow long fermentation/soaking (for flavour development) without the disagvantages that these long developments can bring with whole grain materials. Its an intriguing idea, maybe even a great one, but make no mistake, that one concept is the real subject of the book.

 

AFAIK, The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book is a rather purist (and time-tested - its been around for years) very specifically whole grain book.

Its the recent-traditional orthodoxy compared to Reinhart's radical heresy!

 

But one other book to consider, especially if what you are looking for is real diversity in your baking (thus including more whole grain flours and whole grains), is Dan Lepard's 'The Handmade Loaf' - there's a US-tweaked version in paperback (so not expensive - $17.95 at full list) called 'The Art of Handmade Bread'. There's a lot of (different!) whole grains getting used to make breads that are both unusual and delicious. (Some, not all, use sourdough/leaven and rather a lot call for whole grain materials.)

AND the author does personally answer questions on his forum... (The forum might give you a feel for some of what the book covers - there's 11 pages of threads on the book so far)

See for yourself at http://www.danlepard.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=6

The book has been mentioned on TFL http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/404/dan-lepard-handmade-loaf

Lilandra's picture
Lilandra

Hey! Thanks for all your extensive replies!

Now, I'm going to sit through the list of books you've created for me and try to figure out for myself what I'm looking for in a whole grains book (simple, easy to find ingredients!) and try to figure out what might sorta match my needs.

 And on the assumption that you've all provided good books, I can't go too wrong ... I'll be learning stuff from any book even if I'm not up to cooking from it...yet (it took me two years to find something that I was up to making from Baking by Flavor but...when I finally did...mmmmm).

 thanks again!

Lilandra

JIP's picture
JIP

I have Reinhart's book I also have the Bob's Red Mill book http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Baking-Book/dp/B000PHWDNA/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1218747897&sr=1-1 which is very similar to the KAF book and I like them both.