The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What to do with extra potatoes and dill?

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Joe Fisher's picture
Joe Fisher

What to do with extra potatoes and dill?

Make potato dill bread, of course! After I made my wife tilapia, pan fried in a butter dill sauce, with red potatoes on the side, I had to do something with the leftover ingredients.

These overproofed quite a bit (too warm + inattention), and the left one deflated badly when I moved it, even with my Superpeel.

That said, they looked and tasted delicious! The crumb was soft and moist. The crust was just a little crispy on the outside, thick and chewy on the inside; as close to perfect as I think I'm going to get. The dill added a great flavor. I will definately make these again.

Recipe to follow.

-Joe

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Joe Fisher's picture
Joe Fisher

Recipe taken from:

Country Living Recipe Finder

My changes: I doubled the recipe, used a little less IDY than called for (4tsp for the doubled recipe), and let my starter sit for 1 hour.

Recipe from the link above:

INGREDIENTS:
Sponge:
2 1/4 teaspoons (1 packet) instant active dry yeast
1/2 cup bread flour
1/2 cup warm spring water (100 degrees F)

Dough:
1 russet potato (about 6 1/2 ounces) , peeled
3 1/4 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

DIRECTIONS:
1. Make the starter: In a medium bowl, combine yeast and flour. Stir in water until mixture makes a soft dough. Cover with a clean, damp kitchen towel and place in a warm, draft-free place -- 20 minutes to overnight.

2. Cook the potato: In a small saucepan, place potato with enough water to cover and cook until tender -- 10 to 15 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the potato. Reserve 1 cup of potato water and cool to room temperature. In a small bowl, mash the potato until smooth.

3. Make the dough: In a large bowl or food processor fitted with metal blade, combine mashed potato, potato water, starter, bread flour, salt, and olive oil. Use a wooden spoon to mix the dough until it forms into a soft ball, or process until the dough comes together in a ball and rides around the bowl with the blade. By hand, on a lightly floured surface, knead dough until smooth and supple -- about 10 minutes -- or mix in food processor for 45 more seconds.

4. Proof the dough: Coat a large bowl with the vegetable oil. Shape dough into a ball, place in the bowl, and turn to coat on all sides. Cover with a clean, damp kitchen towel and let rise in a warm, draft-free place -- 1 to 11/2 hours.

5. Form the loaf: Line a baker's peel or a baking sheet with parchment paper. Sprinkle the paper with cornmeal. Punch down dough and place on a lightly floured surface. Knead in dill and continue to knead for 1 more minute. Form dough into a ball and with a tucking motion pull the outer edges of the dough and tuck underneath. Place the dough on the prepared peel or baking sheet. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place -- about 1 hour.

6. Bake the loaf: Place a baking stone in the lower third of oven and preheat oven to 400 degrees F for at least 30 minutes (to thoroughly heat the stone). Rub the surface of the risen loaf with flour and spray it with a fine mist of water. Use a sharp knife or razor blade to cut three parallel slashes about 1/4 inch deep in top of dough. Slide the dough onto the baking stone and mist the oven with 3 or 4 sprays of water. Bake the bread until the crust is golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when tapped -- about 1 hour. Cool on a wire rack. Serve at room temperature. Store in an airtight container.

Nutrition information per serving -- protein: 5.1 g; fat: 3.2 g; carbohydrate: 35 g; fiber: 1.9 g; sodium: 321 mg; cholesterol: 0; calories: 192.

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

They look great!! I am going to give this one a try most definitely!
Thanks for sharing..

Joe Fisher's picture
Joe Fisher

pictures when you're done!

Incidentally, I used red potatoes and left the skins on when I mashed 'em. You can see some of the red flecks in the cut bread.

-Joe

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Joe..Looks like a great crust..did you use steam or did you
just spray the loaves as in the directions?
And yes I will post pics ..: )

Joe Fisher's picture
Joe Fisher

I put an aluminum pan from a chafing dish set on the floor of the oven. When I put my loaf on the stone, I throw a cup or so of water into the pan. Close the oven door for about 30 seconds. Then I take a plastic bottle with a narrow tip and generously squirt down the sides of the oven, being VERY careful not to spray my Fibrament stone. Repeat twice more.

Here's what the bottle looks like:

Container store link

The one on the left. I found that using a spritzer didn't generate much steam. This bottle gives me a strong, narrow, easily aimed stream of water I can put right where I want.

-Joe