The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kasha

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Marni's picture
Marni

Kasha

I just wanted to share something that worked out well. I was making a multigrain recipe the other day and didn't realize that I was out of cracked wheat.  I substituted kasha ( buckwheat) and it turned out great. It almost dissolved into the loaf, adding just a bit of chewiness. I had never used kasha in bread before, and was pleased with the result. 

My children like so many, don't want "things" in their bread so I don't  experiment very often.  They stayed away, but the adults loved it.

Marni

StephenJ's picture
StephenJ

Kasha ia a wonderful grain with many uses. Buckwheat flour is available and I use it as a 1/2 cup addition to Orange Buckwheat bread. I will try the whole grain in a recipe soon.

KosherBaker's picture
KosherBaker

Mmmmmmm buckwheat blini (crepes). Once I was in a pinch and out of Buckwheat flour to make my blinis. So I tossed the buckwheat groats into a blender with equal parts liquid and they turned out to be so soft that they quickly and easily turned into a thick liquid. Well now I'm going to have to make some blinis this week. :) 

Rudy

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

But baking with kasha rather than preparing it in the traditional way does not provide the unique aroma of steaming kasha.


David

Marni's picture
Marni

David,

What would be the traditional way of steaming?  How is it served? The only time I've  used kasha (until adding it to the bread)  is for the side dish of kasha and bowties. That's not steamed.  Also the grain is broken, not whole. 

 Marni

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Marni.

It's been years since I've made kasha. My recollection is that it is soaked in beaten eggs, then browned in a frying pan, then liquid is added and it's steamed.

I've always followed the recipe on the Wolff's Kasha box. So, if my memory has failed, you can correct me.


David

Marni's picture
Marni

David,

The recipe on the Wolff's box is what I follow too.  I guess I just don't think of it as steamed- it's more like cooking rice. It always seems like a fall or winter dish to me.   Yum. 

Marni