The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help with Hobart mixer

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karmayarn's picture
karmayarn

Help with Hobart mixer

I just was given a 30 qt Hobart mixer with a dough hook, wisk and paddle.  I am not a professional baker but I do like to bake bread.  I have two questions;  How much is the mixer worth? I would guess it is about 20 years old but it looks like new.  I'm just curious.  My second question, which is more fun, is where can I find bread recipes to make such a large quantity?  I'm getting some friends together to make a jumbo batch of bread dough that we can then divide and freeze.  Any suggestions?  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 Amy Grant, Kingfield Maine

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

A used mixer like that, depending on it's condition, could go for $1,500 to $2,500.  Look on eBay for a better idea of current values.

 

As to how to get recipes that big, weigh your ingredients and scale the recipe up.  I have found breads scale with no problems.

 

Also, before you do that, go to the Hobart web site and download the manual for your mixer.  It will tell you what the load limits for your mixer are for all sorts of things.  Like egg whites, cake batter, white bread at 70% hydration, whole wheat breads, bagels at 55% hydration and so on.  It is very important to not overload a mixer.  Also, with a Hobart, don't change speeds while the mixer is in motion.  Let the mixer stop, change gears, and re-start the mixer.

 

Have fun - with anything approaching reasonable care, the mixer will be around long after you are not.

 

Mike

 

dougal's picture
dougal

1/ Does the machine need (and do you have) a 3-phase electricity supply? I'd suspect that electrical hookup might be more involved than just plugging it in...

 

2/ What method has worked for you in the past for freezing dough?

Quote:
I'm getting some friends together to make a jumbo batch of bread dough that we can then divide and freeze.