The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

humidity

Rachael's picture
Rachael

humidity

Hope someone has the anwser for me.  I have trouble with the second rise for my bread when the humidity is high.  Usually, the bread seems "flat".  It taste fine, but there is not enought height.  Are you supposed to use cooler water?  If so, what should the temperature be?

 

Rachael

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Rachael, I don't think that humidity should be a major concern for you during the second fermentation as long as you stay away from the extremes, i.e., make sure the dough doesn't dry out and don't proof in the rain! :)

I would be more concerned with the temperature of your second fermentation.  I find that, as a general rule, a temperature range of approximately 76-78°F works well for most breads for both the first (bulk) and second fermentations.  As you may know, the temperature of the water used to mix the dough should be adjusted to bring your final dough temperature to within this range.    

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

Rachael's picture
Rachael

Rachael

You can tell that I am not that experienced with this.  How do you judge the right temperature of the water if you add the water before the dough rises?

SteveB's picture
SteveB

In her blog, Wild Yeast, Susan gives a nice explanation on how to calculate water temperatures (see Principle #2): 

http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/07/05/water/

SteveB

www.breadcetera.com

dougal's picture
dougal

... how are you measuring your water and flour quantities?

Rachael's picture
Rachael

Rachael

I usually measure the water and flour according to the recipe and then add additional flour based on texture of dough. I do start out with slightly less flour than called for in the recipe.

 

 

Kevin B's picture
Kevin B

 1>> turn your oven on, Low temp, allow to reach this temp, 2 >> TURN OFF, 3 >> open door, let slightly cool, 4 >> place dough inside, with door a-jar, 1 " or so. 5 >> Watch closely.

 

Humidity can affect the dough, at work*  we used " wet Proofe" boxes & " Dry proofe" boxes, depending on need, and we WATCHED CLOSELY.  When I worked at *Dunkn DougNuts, we used a 3 corrner temp method, ( using a digital probe) to get  1>> air temp, 2>> flour temp, to determine 3 >> the water temp, hoter or cooler as needed) << extreamly important to a sweet yeast dougnut dough>>  .  ( smile )

 Water temp ?????

I use a digital meat probe, It can read any temp any item, within its range> So waters temp, or the air, the dough itself:

 

I use the digatal meat probe to gage temp in my dehydrator too:   My dehydrator is square, with varable temps,  and has removable trays: so i can use it to rise doughs with! 

 

 

Any help?  I hope so!  The best of success in your baking!