The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Storing dough in Banneton overnight?

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home_mill's picture
home_mill

Storing dough in Banneton overnight?

I can't stay up late enough to bake my sourdough tonight.

I was thinking of forming the loaf around 10 - 11 pm and putting it in the banneton and into the fridge overnight.

Then take it out early in morning let it finish rising and bake.

I am worried about the dough sticking to the Banneton being in the fridge overnight.

I do use rice flour and semolina to keep it from sticking.

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Home_Mill.

If you have a coiled reed or linen-lined banneton and it is well floured (I use a 50-50 mix of AP and rice flour.), you should have no problem. In fact, many recipes call for overnight cold fermentation. Just enclose your banneton with the loaf in a food grade plastic bag or cover as air-tight as possible in plastic wrap.

Your bread will be more sour than if you proofed and baked it without retardation, and the flavor of many sourdoughs will get more complex. Not all sourdoughs are improved by this. Some cookbooks have specific recommendations regarding retardation for some recipes - for example, Hamelman's "Bread."


David

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

If you have a linen lined banneton be sure to dry it after you remove the dough. I had a liner mildew because I didn't notice the first signs under the coating of rice flour, so now I remove it from the banneton and let it sit on the stove while the bread bakes. Now I only need to add a pinch of rice flour after 2 or 3 bakes and the dough never sticks. A.

home_mill's picture
home_mill

Hi David,

 Will it rise appreciably overnight in the fridge?

 How long would I typically wait after taking it out of the fridge before putting in the oven?

 

Thanks 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Home_Mill.

I'll give you my experience with the usual warnings that your starter, refrigerator, recipe, kitchen temperature may be different. So no guarentees.

With that understanding: Usually, I get very little rising in the refrigerator, if the loaf is put in soon (within 45 minutes or so) after forming.

After removing the loaves from the refrigerator, it takes 1-2 hours for them to warm up and another 1-3 hours to rise to double. Most often, I plan on baking 4 hours after removing the loaves from the refrigerator. Now, this would be for a mostly white flour sourdough boule weighing 1.5 pounds and around 66% hydration with no added yeast.

Any deviation from any of these parameters is likely to yield different results.


David