The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fermented Apple Cider

Dave W's picture
Dave W

Fermented Apple Cider

In one of Nancy Silvertons recipes "Normandy Rye" it says 8onzs of fermented apple cider, does she mean just apple cider or is it something different ? i'm on day one of the recipe.

Cheers

Dave W

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Nope, she means the hard stuff; fermented, fizzy and alcoholic, just like grandpa used to make.  You can use regular (sweet) cider; your bread will have a slightly different flavor than it would if it were made with the hard cider.

Paul

suave's picture
suave

Hamelman has a very similar recipe in his book and says that it is a great way to use regular apple cider that's gone a little off. 

Mike

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Apple cider that is "off" would be more acidic.  Fermented apple cider is acidic and contains less sugar (transformed to alcohol by beasties).  If you cant get the real stuff, try adding some apple vinegar to diluted sweet cider.  

Mini O

suave's picture
suave

Not really, alcoholic fermentation won't change the pH, since for all practical intents purposes ethanol is neutral.  What it will do is lower the level of sugars and make natural tartness and acidity more noticeable. 

Mike

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

or wine, the pH is still the same? cool...

I thought ethanol was a distilling process, hard cider is just fermented only.  And the pH is the same? 

Mini O

suave's picture
suave

Fermentation in this case means that some of the sugars in apple juice are being converted into ethanol.  That ethanol can be distilled off - that's how Calvados is made.  Apple juice to vinegar is a different type of fermentation, and, of course, will lower the pH significantly (lower pH means more acidic medium), since produces acetic acid, not ethanol.

Mike

Dave W's picture
Dave W

Oh dear, but I need it now, or in approx 4hrs time according to the recipe, a bit to late to go off making cider, i'll just have to see what happens with the "Scrumpy Jack" cider iv'e bought !

Cheers

Dave W

dougal's picture
dougal

The wonders of american english!

How would one make cider without fermenting it?  !!!  

MaryinHammondsport's picture
MaryinHammondsport

First you take apple juice, add a lot of "preservatives" to it, and/or pasteurize it, then label it cider. You could leave it out in the kitchen for a month, and though it might spoil it sure isn't going to get a single bubble of fizz. Tastes like apple juice from start to finish.

My Dad had a cider press, a small one that was person-powered as opposed to horse-powered, and neighbors came with their apples every fall. Fun times, and more fun times were undoubtedly had in January when the barrel in the cellar had gone hard.

I suspect you can buy real hard cider by the bottle somwhere with a liquor license, but it's not the same.

Mary 

suave's picture
suave

Here cider is unfiltered, unsweetened apple juice and the good stuff is only really available for a few weeks in the fall at apple-growing farms. At least I think so - I don't think I ever bought it from the store. 

Mike

Oldcampcook's picture
Oldcampcook

I can remember as a kid, we used to drive from Washington, D.C. to the Shenandoah Valley in Virgina just to buy apples and apple cider.  We bought both kinds, the "hard" and the "regular". 

I remember the "hard" was supposed to be reserved for my folks, but we kids used to sneak a "snort" once in a while.  It was good stuff, Maynard!

And Mary is absolutely correct, the commercial stuff is not nearly the same.

Bob

Dave W's picture
Dave W

Well iv'e made them now, two loaves, I thought the mix was a little sloppy, and the loaves turned out a little on the flat side, but never mind they taste ok, and I had some for sandwiches at work today with some home baked ham and English mustard (of course)! very nice, room for improvement though, and definately worth another go.

Cheers

Dave W