The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My Week

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

My Week

Monday...
Preferment

Tuesday...
2nd

Wednesday...
Pizza

Thursday...
Bread

Friday..
Cake

Sunday...
PizzaMore BreadCrumb

Comments

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

As always, all your breads look wonderful!
What did you get 2nd Prize for?

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

Thank you Paddyscake. 2nd place was in the Newcastle Baking Show for a White 680g Half-Married Hi-Top (1st & 2nd year apprentice section, even though I'm not a real apprentice), I have a couple of 450g versions in the photos above. It was made at TAFE where I've just started studying commercial baking and judged by the BIA of NSW. And unfortunately I didn't think to get photos of my prize winning bread :-(

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

How very exciting for you!! You are on your way to becoming
an accomplished baker. Would love to hear how your studies
go. I have no idea what it entails..but I do know that it is
alot of hard work. Good luck!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Congrats on the award. And, indeed, quite an impressive week.

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

The four strand plait at the bottom is a variation of the flax seed recipe you posted. I didn't proof it long enough and the bottom of my oven was too hot when baking but still it was quite nice.

  • 75% -- Bakers Flour
  • 10% -- Rye Flour
  • 10% -- Wholemeal Flour
  • 5% -- Fine Oatmeal
  • 1.5% -- Instant Yeast
  • 2.5% -- Salt
  • 67% -- Water
  • 25% -- Flax Seed
  • 2% -- Gluten
  • 1% -- Olive Oil
  • 1% -- Sugar
  • 1% -- Lecithin Granules
  • 1% -- Light Dry Malt
  • 1% -- Bread Improver
dgibson's picture
dgibson

Well done, as with all artisan bread making (home and industry)you need to have passion for making good bread but also disapline to keep perfecting your skills. I am impressed that you have both and look forward to following your experiances with bread making. I think the thing that I got from your 2nd place in the bread show was respect the flour and as we only use a few ingrediants in bread making and the quality of the flour (protien) is so important. The other thing is you should be very proud to have placed 2nd considering that you were competing against trade apprentice. Well done.
PS ask me for a pizza recipe next week a have an excellent pre ferment.

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

At first I felt like I was cheating by using a different flour to everyone else in the class. The crumb of the loaves I made at TAFE yesterday with the Wallaby flour was pretty much the same as the show bread made a couple of weeks ago, very impressive. As for my placing I hope it's the first of many and not just in bread, my real goal in starting the course was pastry...
Last week was my first go at pizza and I've been using the same formula as my bread with suprisingly good results. I've been meaning to ask you for some starter but I keep forgetting to bring a container :-(
You should mention who you are it's probably not obvious to everyone ;-)

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

Thanks again guys...
The course is broken up into bread, cakes\sponges, pastry and continental cakes. Currently I'm doing bread and cakes\sponges. I'm having a bit of trouble remembering all the theory behind cakes\sponges but otherwise I am finding the course quite easy a little hard on the feet though ;-)

luc's picture
luc

KazaKhan,

I am curious about two items on your list of ingredients.
The 1% of Lecithin Granules and the 1% of Bread Improver.

First off for Lecithin What I could find was here

Which seems to be a very commercial form (not neccessarily negative) of baking in terms of what a commercial style baker would look for in crumb and eveness and uniformity of structure. It appears what the Wikipedia link refers to in terms of being a Surfactant
is exemplified by the crumb of the two loaves of white bread in your photos.

For the 'bread improver' I found many different links. Most of them similar to this.

Can you tell me the theory/advantages behind using both the lecithin and the 'bread improver' in these loaves?

Was it required as part of your course? Does if factor into the majority of commercial baking as taught by your school?

I'm not much on white bread myself but the loaves do look stellar for both color of crust, overall form and eveness of crumb.

Congratulations on the medal as well!

Best regards,
Luc

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

I've been buying various stuff from my local health food store. I know that lecithin is good for us so I bought some to try and not having any idea what effect it would have I thought 1% would be a good place to start.
The 1% bread improver is as far as I know used to help develop the gluten more rapidly and to aid in the shelf life of the loaf. If not using a rapid process it isn't necessary. I use it because I push my bread out in 2-3 hours, I like being able to get up in the morning and know that I can have a reasonable loaf ready for lunch.

luc's picture
luc

Hmm... interesting. From everything I'd read on Lecithin there was still no conclusive study showing that it has any direct benefit for humans. In fact it seems that many of the studies regarding Lecithin have been of rather poor quality.

But I digress... I'm more interested in baking than in supplements.

It sure does seem to be common as a food additive. Primarily as an emulsifier and a surfactant. Pretty much anything from the grocery these days contains emulsifiers in one form or another. Good, bad or indifferent I'll leave that up to you to decide.

As for the 'bread improver' - interesting. I've often wondered how I could get loaves out faster - exactly the way you mention. Not that I don't have patience and like the artisan process of making bread - but sometimes my schedule just doesn't permit it. When one considers the needs and time constrictions of commercial baking it brings a whole new light to food additives.

What brand of 'bread improver' do you use?

And I'd be curious to know what's in it.

Best regards,
Luc

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

Well I knew that lecithin was supposed to be good for us, most of the info I checked after following your links seemed to show no harmful effects have been found rather then what good it does us...
I use Lowan's bread improver and instant yeast as that is all that is really available in my local supermarkets. I will be trying fresh compressed yeast and hopefully another brand of improver soon from one of the wholesalers near here. I can't tell you the ingredients of the improver as I threw away the packet. Lowan

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

Fact Sheets
There are a couple of PDF files at the above link with more information on lecithin if you or anyone else is still interested...

luc's picture
luc

deleted - duplicate post

dgibson's picture
dgibson

Very interesting subject improvers and rapid doughs, as with every thing that is faster (fast food) we have to add things that make them look and taste like the real thing. These are some ingrediants that you would find in commercial bread improvers (you may need a code breaker)-emulsifiers (322 soy, 471) food acids (260,262) soy flour, minerals salts (170,510), emulsifier (471), Enzyme (1100). Basically these powder type improvers improve bread,shelf life, high volumn slicing, crumb brightness and softness, crust color and volumn. You can see that by some of the bread that Kazakhan has been producing at home. There are some more natural ways of getting the same results and I will let KK test this at home and share with you the results.
dg-try this for pizza, put old dough (up to 1/4) to naturally improve this dough or bulk ferment for 2 hours, knock back and roll. Brush with olive oil before putting on topping. Best on baking stone.

Plain Flour 2 Kg
Water 1 Lt
Fresh Yeast 30 gr
Honey 30g
Salt 40g
Olive Oil 30g

KazaKhan's picture
KazaKhan

I tried a bulk ferment yesterday with no improver, check my blog. The overall result was the same either way I can't quite get it right, my bread stales too quickly :-(
I'll try that pizza formula in the next coulpe of days and post some pictures.

Melana's picture
Melana

Just curious how the pizza dough came out??