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5 Burner Gas Ovens with convection

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nancy55's picture
nancy55

5 Burner Gas Ovens with convection

I need to purchase a new gas oven - am undecided between 2 models

does anyone have a 5 burner and what are your experiences?

this is the model with 5 burners

1 - 5 burner oven / 1-5,000 BTU, 2-9,500 BTU, 1- 12,000BTU & 1-16,000BTU

this is the model with 4 burners

1- 5,000BTU, 2 - 9,5000BTU & 1-14,000BTU 

 Also its a frigidaire and has convection included which they claim its for even cooking - please share your experiences and recommendations.

 

rideold's picture
rideold

I have a kenmore that sounds like the first one in your list.  Atleast the 5 burners are the same.  The electric convection/conduction oven works great except I never use the convection.  Maybe if I baked cakes or pastries it would be helpful but for bread I think it is rather useless.  I like having the 5th burner though.  It was a good compromise from a 36" 6 burner stove when we figured out we couldn't fit anything that big in our kitchen!  If I had it to do over I would have still bought the 5 burner but not spent the extra on the convection option.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Nancy,

We have a 5-burner stove very similar to the one shown here: http://www.jennair.com/catalog/product.jsp?parentCat=2&cat=69&prod=84&tabOption=specs#info

We occasionally use the 5th burner in the center, mainly for small jobs like melting butter.  If we didn't have it, it wouldn't make a big difference.  The first thing to consider is, how often do you find yourself wishing for one more burner because the first four are occupied?  The second is, if all of the other burners are occupied, is there any room left to fit even a small pan on the 5th burner?

I'm still learning how to bake with convection.  It makes a big difference for roasting a turkey, for instance.  I'm told that some other foods, such as pastries, also respond well to convection baking.  As rideold (and others in other threads) has noted, it doesn't seem to offer a substantial advantage for bread baking.

Not to make your decision more difficult or anything, but have you considered a dual-fuel range?  We really like having the gas burners for the stove top and electric heating for the ovens.     

PMcCool

nancy55's picture
nancy55

Yes I was wondering if the 5th burner can be used when the other 4 are occupied

the models I am undecided from are:

 5  burner (also has the continuous grids)

http://www.frigidaire.com/products/cooking/ranges/free-standing_gas/prod_GLGF386D.asp 

 

or 4 burner

http://www.frigidaire.com/products/cooking/ranges/free-standing_gas/prod_GLGF376D.asp 

I of course have not used convection but one reason I want a new oven is for even baking -  

which model would you suggest? 

 

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

If I were choosing between the two models that you are considering, my choice would probably be for the 5-burner model.  But, I don't know that my criteria are the same as your criteria.

My thinking is that the 5-burner model offers a bit more flexibility.  I'm not so excited by the 5th (center) burner being an oval shape; that seems as though it is purpose-built for the "optional" griddle.  I do like the continuous grates better than the individual grates.  It allows you to shift things around on top of stove without tipping them or sloshing the hot contents.  Plus, they tend to be thicker/stronger than the individual burner grates.

As far as the 16,000 BTU burner goes, it's another burner.  That's typically where I park a stock pot or griddle or largest skillet.  For instance, I filled a stock pot about 2/3 full of water and boiled sweet corn this weekend, using the large burner.  It still takes a while to heat up that large a mass of water.  But, even after dumping in a dozen ears of corn, the water came back to boiling fairly quickly.  So, like any other tool, it has its uses.  It isn't the burner that you would want to use to make up a small sauce to put over your grilled peaches, for instance.  (Think 1/4 cup each of butter, brown sugar, and rum, plus a teaspoon of cinnamon; heat until the butter melts.  Brush over the peach halves while they are on the grill, then drizzle the remaining sauce over the peaches after they are plated.)  For something like that, the tiny 5th burner in the center of my stove is just the ticket.

Try making a list of the things that you already do, or want to do, with your stove.  Then go find the one that lets you do all of those things without breaking the budget.  Trying to make a choice on the basis of competing feature sets may lead you to pick a stove that, though lovely, still doesn't do what you want it to do.  You mention even baking is one of your criteria.  It may be that you would prefer an electric oven over a gas oven in that case.  Just a thought.  Look for on-line reviews of the models you are considering, too.  If anyone has a strong opinion one way or the other, you'll hear about it.  Happy hunting!

PMcCool

nancy55's picture
nancy55

the 5 burner does not have an oval burner its a round 9,500 in the center.

one of my concerns with the 5 burner is the location of that 2nd 9,500 its in the center and the other in the front left.  Since that should be the one that is the most often used don't you think that the center occupied takes away space from the other burners?

Another concern is with the 4 burners - only 2 are 9,500 - will I feel I don't have enough cooking space since the other one left is 14,000 and 5,000.  I am not sure exactly how they work (since I am use to an old oven with 4- 9,500 burners)

when using the 14,000 can you lower the temperature on them to 9,500?

everytime you need a new appliance all these new features make it so complicated.

 thanks for your help

 

rideold's picture
rideold

I have the same burner configuration and I think it works pretty good.  If I had it my way I'd have something more like a Viking style where there are four (or six if I was really rich!) burners that went from simmer to 14 or 15,000 btu.  With that ideal a few thousand dollars out of my range I'm pretty happy with what I have.  You have to shuffle pots and pans around a bit.  Bring big stuff to boil on the front right and then move it to the back right to use the 5,000 btu burner to simmer for a while.  The two 9,500 burners work for pretty much everything and the 14,000 will still simmer in some cases.  On ours it actually gets taken up by the tea kettle more often than not.  It is a bit of a tight fit to use all 5 burners but around big meals I really like having the extra burner.  One think I have found is that it is nice to have a good (i.e. high cfm) vent hood that vents outside as all 5 burners put out some serious heat when they are all on.  At 52,000 btu total that is like turning on the furnace!  Makes for a cozy kitchen in the winter when cooking a big meal :)  Oh, one more thing.  I have the dual fuel (gas cooktop, electric oven).  I've always wondered if the dual fuel is worth it.  I've never had a gas oven before so I can't comment.  Good luck

 

Almost forgot.  Regarding your question about the two larger burners being turned down.  I don't know how low they go in terms of btu's but both of the big ones turned to low will work fine for large pots of food.  If I turn a 9 qt stock pot of pasta to medium it is about perfect for cooking pasta after using high to get it to a boil.

nancy55's picture
nancy55

also how do you like the 16,000 power burner - what do you use it for?

 

thanks, 

Marni's picture
Marni

Although I don't have this type of range, I hope these thoughts will be relevant to your situation.

I find that I rarely need as much heat as is available on my cooktop.  The burners create a large gas ring that overwhelms many pots.  I suggest measuring your pots and pans (or better yet taking a few to a showroom) to see how they'll work for you.  Most home cooks don't need very high BTUs.

A continous grate is wonderful.  You can slide heavy pots around easily, changing to a more convenient or smaller burner as needed.

I have convection and rarely use it.  I find it unpredicable for baking.  Sometimes it only seems to dry things out.

Marni

vpsihop's picture
vpsihop

good point about the continuous grates...

remember convection needs slightly lower heat and less cooking time than conventional ovens.

in conventional ovens a layer of steam insulation forms around the food, so higher temps and longer cooking times are needed.

convection moves the "insulation" away so lees heat and time is needed to get nice color on food.  less time in the oven and lower temps should result in more tender food.

 

Marni's picture
Marni

Yes, convection cooking generally uses lower heat.  I've never read or seen anything about steam.  My understanding is that hot air circulates in the oven.

Here are a few articles that might be helpful:

A couple of the pages are loading wrong, just scroll down a bit to see the full article.

http://www.appliance.net/2008/questions-and-comments-about-convection-ovens-397

http://www.appliance.net/2007/convection-ovens-171

 http://www.appliance.net/2008/bosch-dual-fuel-range-receives-top-ranking-for-the-fourth-time-in-a-row-416

http://www.appliance.net/2008/how-food-cooks-conduction-convection-and-radiation-411

I hope this helps.

Marni

P.S. Full disclosure: I'm the editor of appliance.net. 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I installed a gas 5 burner cook top recently and I love it. I have one 16,000 btu burner in the middle that I use for heating a Wok and anything else I want to heat quickly and evenly. In my opinion you can't have to much heat for a Wok. Most 4 burner home stoves are way underpowered for a Wok. In my configuration I have one small burner I use for simmering soups or stocks all day, two medium size I use for most general use cooking like eggs and cereals, and one larger that I use for large fry pans and pots. The center burner has gas jets in the middle and also around the perimeter so the heat pattern is more even where as the others heat a ring around the outer portions of the pan and leave the center cooler.

Having had an electric stove for the last 10 years that made me wait for everything, I appreciate being able to boil water for pasta or in this season, corn in just a few minutes. I also have found it is easier to teach my daughter to understand the consequences of changing the heat if she can see the flame change and size the burner for the pan she is using.

Eric 

vpsihop's picture
vpsihop

Ive had a dual fuel convection for about 5 years and i love it.  never had a gas convection,  i dont know if it would heat as evenly, also there is never a need to rotate anything in the oven because of the convection, and ive experimented with it on and off.  Bread comes out MUCH better, and if your doing a prime rib its really awesome cuz the outside gets alot crustier while the inside stays tender.  i tend to cook everything with convection now, even if the real benefits come with foods that are uncovered.  I just feel it reduces hot spots and makes covered foods slightly better.

As for burner selection i think it depends how much your gonna use it, and what your willing to spend. ive never needed to use more than 3 burners at a time, and i just feel that 5 may be overkill, and just another thing that could break.

Also, dont freak out about the BTUs 16K sounds impresive but its really just to get a stock pot boiling faster, and its only gonna be slightly faster than the 14K.  Trying to sear or pan fry at that output will turn anything else into coal. 

 

bigbrowndog's picture
bigbrowndog

I have a Frigidare 4 burner dual fuel stove, with gas burners and electric convection oven.  I purchased it 4 years ago, when we moved cross country, and I was not able to bring my Jenn Air stove, which was gas with convection oven.  Jenn Air waould have been my first choice, but it was out of reach, price wise.

 stove

I have been happy with the performance of the stove overall, and I do like the continuous top grate, easy to slide pans on and off.It also has a warming drawer which is great, and I use a lot.

 

The one thing that I never thought to check before purchasing is the size of the oven cavity, which is 22" wide x 15" deep.  This model is much smaller than my previous oven, and if you'd like to make a 16" pizza, you can't close the door.  You might want to check this on the model you're considering.