The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough rye bread

wadam's picture
wadam

Sourdough rye bread

I've been making this bread for about two weeks now, and I am more pleased than I can say.  It's an original recipe, and it didn't come out quite as expected, but nonetheless, I think it is the best bread that I have ever made.  It is thick-crusted, but the crust is kind of soft and chewy like a ciabatta; and the crumb, while very open, is also moist.  And did I mention that it's sour?  It is almost certainly the sourest bread that I've had since I left the bay area five years ago.

 

Here's a pic:

 

sourdough rye

 

If you're interested, you can find the recipe here:  http://wadam.livejournal.com/233566.html 

saintdennis's picture
saintdennis

Hi Wadam,

your bread looks good.Nice pictures.

                                 Saintdennis

holds99's picture
holds99

Good Morning Wadam,

Your bread looks very nice and rustic, with nice thick crust.  You did nice job.  Don't know if you used the "stretch and fold" technique on the loaf shown in the picture but if you haven't tried it you might give it a try next time.  "Stretch and fold" stretches the gluten very nicely, creating great elasticity and extensibility which results in a very nice open crumb.  Here's a link to Richard Bertinet, a highly regarded French baker who has a school in Bath, England,  where he demonstrates the technique.  In the video he is making a sweet dough but it really doesn't matter which kind of dough you're making, the technique is basically the same.  I have had very good results using this technique.

http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/video/2008/03/bertinet_sweetdough

Best of luck in your baking adventures and keep us posted. 

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

wadam's picture
wadam

What a fantastic demonstration that was!

 

That wasn't my technique for making the dough.  I brought my dough together in a stand mixer, then let it stand for a half hour, then kneaded it with a hook at medium speed for about ten minutes.  Then, once the dough had smoothed out, I balled it and placed it in an oiled bowl to rise, folding it after a half hour, and again after an hour.  I'm relatively new to very wet doughs, and this has been a good technique to get me into them.  In the future, however, I might try the stretch and fold technique.  It looks pretty simple and very effective.