The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Commercial Fermentation Time

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whatever868686's picture
whatever868686

Commercial Fermentation Time

Hi guys, I have seen commercial bakeries have their doughs delivered from a central location. How is it possible that their dough can last for the whole day whereas we have to start baking them very soon after fermentation?

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

Refridgeration?

suave's picture
suave

Some of those products are parbaked, that is they are baked  at the production/distribution hub until crumb sets and then flash frozen and, I guess, vacuum-packed.  Local bakery then just sticks these breadsicles in the oven as needed.

Mike

holds99's picture
holds99

Not sure which breads you're referring to but I spoke with the bakery manager at the local supermarket here (Publix) and she told me they do mostly scratch baking, some of it from bagged pre-mixes.  She also said all the artisan breads sold in their artisan bread section are par-baked and frozen at their commissary, then shipped to them. They thaw them and finish them off in their on-site ovens. 

I also spoke with the owner of a local restaurant and he buys par-baked baguettes from Sisco (sp.), a huge national supplier to the food industry.  Actually, the Sisco baguettes at the restaurant were pretty good.  The artisan breads at the supermarket were NOT good.  They must be using conditioners in the artisan bread mix at the commissary because the crust is chewy and the crumb has a texture akin to surgical rubber.  I'm happy to say that I haven't bought commerical bread for more than a year and am intent on keeping my record intact. 

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

whatever868686's picture
whatever868686

Hi, I was looking at the techniques of parbaking. But it seems to be different from what I see happening in commercial bakeries around me. From what I understand, there is a central factory which produces the dough. Then they are transported to the various outlets to be shaped, proofed and baked. So I guess they were freezed throughout the journey.

holds99's picture
holds99

A few years ago I attended a huge food service show at McCormick Place in Chicago and they had quite a few vendors at the show offering par baked, frozen products which they were thawing and baking off at the show and offering samples.  Sisco seemed to have the largest booth, the broadest offering of products and best tasting items.  I can't imagine not having the dough production facility located at the same place the baking is done.  I know for certain that Sara Lee flash freezes their products almost straight out of the oven.  Having said that, anything is possible but I can't imagine why anyone would locate their dough mixing facility in a seperate location from their bulk fermentaton, shaping, proofing, baking and flash freeze facility.  But as I said, anything is possible...Ford Motor Company built the Edsel automobile.  Anyway, here's a link to Sisco's par baked products.

http://www.sysco.com/products/productpage.asp?prodID=150&ctID=45&ptID=1

Howard - St. Augustine, FL