The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Super peel opinions wanted

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karol's picture
karol

Super peel opinions wanted

Hi guys,

I just noticed this Super peel on another site and thought it looked pretty useful and would like everyone's opinions before I buy one. TIA

Doug's picture
Doug

I have bought 2 of these and consider them essential, at least for me. Before the Super Peel, it was dodgy getting flatbreads onto the stone. The Super Peel works exactly like the video on their website. Highly recommended.

karol's picture
karol

Thank you, that's what I wanted to hear, I was worried I would get replies that it was a waste of money or something, it looks really cool. I do need all the help I can get. I am currently using a pizza pan with the holes in it from the local store, I do also have a pizza stone, I thought maybe doing this on the stone would make better pizza, or maybe leave things alone, I want my 13 yr. old son to learn along with me, having this new peel would make things go smoother.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

The Super Peel works great if you don't have a sticky dough or don't dawdle getting the dough loaded. I have had a few miserable experiences when the dough got stuck to the cloth slider. Once you start the process you have a mess if it is stuck in the middle. So, I stopped using this time saver and switched to parchment paper for high hydration doughs. Never a failure with parchment.

Eric

Doug's picture
Doug

Like Eric, I had one experience where the dough stuck to the cloth.  However, I keep a duster of flour handy and add just enough flour so the flatbread doesn't stick to the wooden board.  Once you get the toppings on the dough, time is of the essence, so a quick scoop with the Super Peel gets the flatbread onto the stone.  I haven't tried parchment paper, so I have no basis for comparison. 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Doug,
I have found that I can stretch my pizza dough to the right size and lay it on a piece of parchment lightly dusted with corn meal. Then there isn't a rush to get it in the oven before it sticks. Recently I have learned to quickly add the toppings and load on the stone with a wooden peel. For me it's a breakthrough. Getting just the right amount of flour/cornmeal so I can shake the pie down the ramp onto the stone.

I still use the super peel paddle without the canvas. It's a nice smooth surface and has a good taper that helps me load.

Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

SYLVIAH

I have used mine for loading stuck pizza onto my dusted metal pizza paddle...though Iam getting better at this as I practice making pizza's.  I do this because I'm afraid of burning the cloth when it goes into a very hot wood fired oven... this can be done using caution.  It's great for loading breads into the oven.  I also got one for my daughter.  You'll be so glad you have it when something gets stuck or is hard to place into an oven without distrubing it.  It definately works! Even on the stickest pizza dough! 

Sylvia

GalacticOverlordDesignate's picture
GalacticOverlor...

Then following is a review of the Superpeel written years ago. I have haqd no reason to change my opininion in 6 years.

 

My Name is John and I'm a SuperPeel Addict

The 16th of  April 2002 was the day after my Birthday and I was feeling a little delicate as I logged on but I visited the Usenet  group alt.bread.recipes and there, in a thread about the inversion of proofed loves was a link to a short movie of a device called a Superpeel.

I was sceptical, all devices and "tricks" that offered to replace or enhance a normal peel had been at best marginally efective and didn't help with the problem I was experiencing which was that my Parkinson's Disease was progressing and making very difficult the kind of controlled, sudden, accurate jerk that is needed to operate a standard peel. When I was moving poorly I also had dificulty handling large, heavy loaves with any degree of confidence. Since my favourite breads are high-hydration, Italian style doughs and big French style Country Loaves I was looking at a problematic future.

I was also broke but "nothing ventured nothing  gained" so I emailed Gary Caspar, the inventor, and outlined my problems. He was interested, not having thought of his device's application to mobility-impaired people, and promptly mailed me a SuperPeel on approval with the request to  pay when I had the money.

The package ( "All the way from America" said the Postman, with stunning originality.) arrived a few days later and I opened, assembled (a simple process, even for someone as clumsy as me) and, being fond of "jumping right in" , immediately tried using the new toy on a fat, heavy, fragile,  12" long roll of Raisin Brioche, a very tricky item to pick up by hand. It was so easy it beggared belief. In fact I moved the brioche around a few times, just in case I was about to wake from a pleasant dream, picking  up and putting down the very wobbly Brioche with a facility and precision that I thought my illness had stolen forever.

Since  that day I have used the Superpeel to  lift and position any number of fragile, wobbly, delicate items from Pain a l'Ancienne, through Cocodrillo (possibly the trickiest bread in the universe), any number of Ciabatta variations and even a 4 1/2 pound Poilane style Miche,   all handled, by the Superpeel with consumate ease. Pizza becomes a pleasure to move instead of a razor's edge of high-risk

I was and am a serious amateur breadbaker and the Superpeel is the most useful and effective kitchen tool - the word "gadget" is totaly inappropriate - ever dreamed up to handle bread dough. It picks up  fragile cakes and pastries too,  with more certainty than my hand could  ever muster .

I did, eventually find the money and paid Gary  6 months later. He generously offered a discount but I paid the full amount because, firstly Gary deserves it and secondly, if I'd accepted a discount, I would not be able to say, as I do whenever I mention the Superpeel, that I have not received any reward, monetary or otherwise from nor have I any commercial or advantageous interest in the manufacture  and sale of the Superpeel.
 
You don't have to be mobility impaired to use the SuperPeel, lots of people out there are incapable of using the 'normal' methods of moving dough and cakes. I was often a clumsy man well before Mr Parkinson started stealing my skills. The only thing I regret in the whole saga is that I didn't hear about the Superpeel earlier.

If you have diffficulty moving fragile dough, or you are deterred from making rustic breads because you think they're difficult to move around or your pizzas keep coating the oven floor in Mozarella and tomato sauce, BUY A SUPERPEEL (my caps). You will not regret it and, as each painstakingly crafted loaf slides into the oven, "smooth as Castor Oil", you will think kindly of the shaky Brit who told you about this "miracle of rare device".

John Wright

John Wright is an enthusiastic (His long suffering friends would probably use the word  "obsessed" or "fanatical" or both.) amateur baker who conducts his baking dialogues, mostly, on the Internet.  He has been baking bread for 30 years and lives in Yorkshire, England in a chaotic household with an oven in the last stages of mechanical collapse and the wreckage of 3 heavy duty mixers which he will cannibalise to make a new one "When he gets around to it".

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karol's picture
karol

Thank you so much for your wonderful and so funny post, I did order it yesterday and I am so happy I did. I too am an serious  amateur, mostly messy and not so good with bread baking, I do have the zo bread machine the Kitchenaid pro mixer and big food processor and all the latest stuff I see and like, it would be nice if I just knew what to do with all this, I wondered if you ever tried the nicer dicer food dicer, it is great and so easy to use, safer than a knife, it would be good for someone like you.

GalacticOverlordDesignate's picture
GalacticOverlor...

I am a man called John who happens to have Parkinson's disease NOT a Parkison's disease sufferer calle3d John.

I cannot deny that the illness does play a major part in my life but I try to live as if I am  "normal" (whatever that may mean, buggerall IMHO) 

So I'll take the Superpeel because it allows me to do someting I want to do and there is no other way.

Knives are a different matter. I have retained some of my knife skills and it is definitely a case of use it or lose it.

When I can no longer use a knife I will buy some form of chopping device. Until then, I will continue to use my very sharp knives because nothing comes close to the versatilty and eay cleaning of a sharp 8 - 10 inch cook's knife.

Love

John 

 

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karol's picture
karol

I am sorry if I offended you in some way, I never meant to, I suggested the nicer dicer because I happen to love this product and it makes things so much easier for me, I am a bit of a clutz and often have cut into my finger.

GalacticOverlordDesignate's picture
GalacticOverlor...

And I do.

The tone of my posting was unnecessarily strident, confrontational and totally out of order.

I wasn't offended, although I'm not surprised you thought I was.

Oh well, If God had meant us to fly he'd have given us tickets.

Love

John 

 

 

karol's picture
karol

Thank you for that post I was waiting for it, I too have my own disabilities,

so I do look for things that make life easier, especially in the kitchen.

pizzameister's picture
pizzameister

Hi John and others,

As some have mentioned occasional sticking to the cloth, I thought I would address that.  John uses very wet doughs and has had no problems to my knowledge.  It is one of those things, though, that must be taylored to personal use.  Generally, the wetter the dough, the more flour needed on the cloth to keep it from sticking.  A lot of doughs require little to none. Then it also matters how long your dough is going to sit on the peel prior to moving it.  The best method I feel, and what the Super Peel  really excels at, is to just pick the dough up when ready to move it to the oven.  The gentle pick up action will not disturb the dough and not degas it.  You can also pick up and set your pizza, etc. back to the work surface, a dry run of sorts, to test for sticking and add a little more flour if it is needed before heading to the oven.

Generally, once you get the hang of it for the types of baking you do there is no looking back.

This is not meant to be a sales pitch, rather just some helpful tips for users.

John, I still need to replace your mole wrenches!!!!  I know! I know!

Pizzameister - Gary

sandrasfibre's picture
sandrasfibre

ok, what is a super peel and where does one get it?

karol's picture
karol

Go to superpeel.com and you  will see. It is the best way for you to see it.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

SYLVIAH 

 I got mine from BreadTopia.com under pizza supplies...they also have extra cloth covers and a good price.  Also a video using it that's fun to watch...I really also like using it for the pie doughs.

Enjoy the day, Sylvia

Maeve's picture
Maeve

I will admit I've only used the new superpeel twice, but each time my wet, sticky pizza dough stuck to the peel.


I washed it and put it on the wooden paddle thingy, loosely, just like it suggested.  And then floured it, just as suggested.  Yesterday I tried again and floured it some more.  I prepped the pizza on a slab of marble and used the superpeel, tried to put it in the oven and it was stuck all over!  I managed to get it off, but the pizza was torn and I got cheese burnt onto the stone.  feh.


 


I'm obviously doing something wrong, so any opinions?  Yes, my dough is quite sticky - it rises in a well-oiled bowl.  Perhaps I should use less oil?


 


I've been tweaking my recipe for a very long time and this was the recipe I used with parchment paper - it gave me a nice chewy, thin crust pizza.  But it was sticky and unmanageable, which is why I stopped using a regular peel - that was disastrous.  And I dislike the grittiness of cornmeal.


 


I got the superpeel because I wanted to use it with Pappy's new Big Green Egg, however, I figured I should practice before using the BGE and so far I haven't been happy with my results.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Super peels are great...but I no longer use mine...It does take a little practice...but it will become easy even with the stickiest of doughs...don't let it sit to long on the peel keep it moving...also try mixing only a little simolina flour with the regular flour...I don't use the gritty corn meal either...make sure there are no damp spots, cheese anything on your peel other than a the floured bottom of your pizza...after a while you will be able to use less and less flour and keep all from sticking...keep it moving...top some...shake it...top some more...shake it gently all the way to the oven....yes you can top it right on the peel!  Leaves a very neat/clean kitchen.. less mess!  With practice.


Sylvia

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I had only one disaster with the super peel, and that's when I let a very wet dough proof on it.  When I only use it to pick up and immediately move the wet doughs I have no problem. 


I got the super peel for another reason--I was having asthma attacks from the burning flour, corn meal, and parchments I was using to move my doughs onto the hot stone.  I reasoned that I could use less witht he super peel, but I didn't find that to be exactly the case.  It still needed quite a bit of flour and the excess flour on the belt tended to fall into the oven from the back side of the peel as I loaded the dough onto the stone.


I played around with different options.  One was to put parchment under my dough and not flour the super peel at all.  I trimmed the parchment around the dough with a scissors to minimize the burning.  But that was a pain.


Finally, I replaced the belt on the Super Peel with parchment paper.  Viola--that was the answer for me.  The clips that come with the super peel won't work with slippery parchment, so I used binder clips (or bull nosed clips) from an office supply store instead.  Now I can pick up doughs without added flour or cornmeal, and get them safely to the stone without difficulty.  I can reuse the same parchment "belt" many times before it needs replacement. 

pizzameister's picture
pizzameister

A note on handling very wet dough with the Super Peel.


Like to any other surface, very wet dough may stick to the cloth of the Super Peel if given the chance.  Most of our users have no problem after some practice.  As John writes, he handles extremely wet dough with no difficulty at all.


Jan mentions use of parchment paper as a temporary belt, attaching with spring binder clips.  This is covered in the instructions.  The Super Peel was designed so that standard 12" wide rolls of parchment, waxed paper etc., could convneiently used.  As she has found, very wet dough will even stick to silicone parchment, if left to rest on it.


A preferred and best way to go with very wet dough, is to build pizza or raise bread on the counter or work surface, on a sufficient bed of flour (or other) to keep it from sticking down.  Use the floured Super Peel to lift and move the item to baking stone when ready.  The layer of flour in direct contact with the bottom of the wet dough will adhere to it, while most of the excess will be pushed forward and not lifted onto the Super Peel.  Then transfer to baking stone should be easy and stick free.


Also, as noted by at least one poster, just keep things moving along, though there is no need to hurry unnecessarily.


Hope this helps,


Gary


www.superpeel.com


 

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

Will it work with bread proofed on a couche?  Or might the two fabrics tend to get tangled with each other?


 

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Just use the peel like a flipping board in this case? Proof the bread seam-side up, then flip it onto the edge of the peel and once it's on the end use the conveyor to move it?

pizzameister's picture
pizzameister

That is a good question and sugestion.  If you try to lift from the couche, there will be a little bit drag between the two cloths and it will probably cause some difficulty.  If some one holds the couche in place, you should be able to do this OK.  Just keep the downward pressure very light sort of like a skimming motion.  Keep me posted please.


PM