The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Salt on Focaccia

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staff of life's picture
staff of life

Salt on Focaccia

I like to have chunky sea salt on the top of my foccacia (is focacce plural?) but it soon melts, for lack of a better word, into the top of the bread and just makes a wet mess.  I've tried salting before and after baking, and after oiling, but to no avail.  Any ideas?

SOL

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

It always happens when I make pretzels.  I think there's something called pretzel salt, possibly sold by King Arthur, that doesn't melt.  I've heard of such a thing, but having never seen it in Canada, I've never bought it.  When I make focaccia, I don't use much salt on the top and it's usually eaten in a day, but the salt on pretzels melting into a wet mess drives me nuts.

mse1152's picture
mse1152

SOL (love that acronym...),

I use Kosher salt on top of focaccia, and it doesn't melt or dissolve in the oven heat.  I spread olive oil on the dough, then sprinkle the salt, and into the oven with it!

Sue 

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

So what does SOL MEAN?

Rosalie

staff of life's picture
staff of life

My sister kindly pointed out that SOL can also be read as Shoot (I'm being nice) Out of Luck, which is what I think you're referring to.  I've used the method/ingredients you describe, but still have a problem.  I'm curious about this pretzel salt thing--I've seen it in my bulk food shop but always figured it was just a way of marketing kosher.  I wonder how it's different?

Staff of Life

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

I've used a number of salts.  Morton's Kosher, Diamond Kosher, Morton's Curing salt, and a few coarse sea salts (most recently baleine).  All worked well on focaccia, bagels, and pretzels.

 

On the focaccia, I don't put a lot of oil on the focaccia, though there is a good bit in the focaccia.  I drizzle the oil and make sure it gathers in the dimples.  Then I sprinkle on the salt.  Never a problem.

 

Hope something there helps,

Mike 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

coated on the salt, a light film, does the trick. 

It was on a German site about salt on pretzels. What happens is that salt naturally draws moisture to it. Depending on the humidity, the salt draws moisture out of the air and starts to "melt" and turn eventually into little puddles of salt water. Block the reaction, or keep the salt from moist air (steam, high humidity) Bingo! I'll be back....

Found the discussion: (in German) http://www.baeckerdienst.de/backforum/discus/messages/1/950.html?1105719638

mention of centrifuge loaded with large salt and hot coco butter being added and spun off.

Food grade carnauba wax

Mini O

staff of life's picture
staff of life

I tried last night making a foccacia with pretzel salt--it still was distinct from the dough this morning!  It seems like the salt granules are harder than regular kosher.  At any rate, thanks!

SOL

Eli's picture
Eli

SOL

I use Grey Sea Salt on mine (Celtic Sea Salt). It already has moisture and seems to last longer.

staff of life's picture
staff of life

I think I'll try the suggestion of the pretzel salt.  I've tried it seems every variation of using the kosher and it just is not working.  Thanks for all the advice!

SOL