The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Keeping artisan dough in the fridge?

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npsmama's picture
npsmama

Keeping artisan dough in the fridge?

Hi all,
Life is pretty hectic at the moment and I am looking for time-saving techniques that yield good (I know it can't be as good as the traditional way) results.

As such I tried the Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes.
Well, I tried the method out 3 times and I really did not like the result. It was OK as beginner's homemade bread but I like real breads like Sourdough or long-fermentation breads.

So my question is: is there any way I can prepare a large quantity of dough and use the fridge to keep it for, say, 4-5 days?

saintdennis's picture
saintdennis

yes, you can and then take it out from the fridge and let it in room temperature about half hour and mix it with a little water and flour to refresh it.Do not use too much flour and water,just a little

Saintdennis

nd89sc88's picture
nd89sc88

I've been working with the "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes" method for a while and I think you can get the great flavorful sourdough if you use that method as a base and modify it a bit.  Two things that have really helped me.   

One is to reduce the yeast.  I've tried it with as little as 1/2 tsp of yeast and it works great.  Obviously it takes longer to get the initial rise, up to 12 hours.  I've kind of settled in at 1 tsp as my favorite amount and the first rise is usually accomplished in about 4-5 hours.  This helps reduce the commercial yeasty-ness flavor to the bread.  

Next is you need to always have a batch going.  The tip from the book is to never clean out your bucket, just mix your next batch up with the leftover bits still in the bucket. In fact I've taken that even farther.  I mix my next batch up with a portion of the last batch of dough still in the bucket, up to a whole loaves worth at times.  Simply add in your water and mix/dissolve the remaining dough for a minute or so, then add in your remaining ingredients and stir the old dough into your new batch.  

Different flours can obviously also help your flavor.  Their base recipe that calls for unbleached AP flour is kind of boring, but switching to KAF bread flour, adding in some whole wheat or rye, all helps.  If you do change the flours remember that you will need to modify/increase your water due to the differences in protein content. So keep at it and I think you will get the flavor you're looking for. 

Bill 

npsmama's picture
npsmama

Thanks for the tips

What proportion of wholewheat or rye do you suggest?

 

How long do you keep the very first batch in the fridge before baking from it? 

nd89sc88's picture
nd89sc88

I just did a loaf using a 3-2-1 ratio (3 cups AP, 2 cups bread flour and 1 cup white whole wheat-all KAF).  It turned out beautiful loaves, that even my kids will eat. Trying to work WW flour in is an issue with the other three members of my house, so I've been working with the white WW flour from KAF.  It is very mild and light in color, and therefore acceptable to the rest of the family. LOL.

 I use the same ratio when using rye flour.  Also, I let the batch sit in the fridge a minimum of three hours to get it cool enough to handle a little easier.

Good luck and let me know what you think.

 Bill 

npsmama's picture
npsmama

Thanks

I'll try it and let you know 

swtgran's picture
swtgran

Bill, thank you for changes to the Artisan in 5.  I am going to mix some up today with your yeast reduction.  I have made the bread a few times and though it has served the purpose but I felt the flavor was just a little off.  The only one that I have found to be really tasty is the Semolina recipe.  Terry