The Fresh Loaf

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Sourdough Starter Storage?

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heymaryn's picture
heymaryn

Sourdough Starter Storage?

I have been storing my starter in a crock that I bought when I bought my starter. It is very nice, but I don't like the fact that the top just sits precariously on top. I have seen pictures on sites for starter where the starter is stored in wire-bail jars. That would allow for a completely air free starter. Anyone have any experience with the wire-bail jars, or should I stick to the crock???

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is what I store my starter in.

It came with a rubber seal that you can put in the middle if you want it 100% air-tight. I omit the seal, figuring a teeny bit of air is probably good if I don't want to suffocate it. The wire and glass provide a tight enough seal.

heymaryn's picture
heymaryn

heymaryn
Would complete lack of air kill the starter? Could you also tell me what will happen if I leave my starter alone (vacation) for a couple of weeks? I'm very attached to my starter! Thanks.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I doubt lack of air would kill it, but I don't know that for sure.

2 weeks is probably fine, but if it is going to be longer than 2 weeks, I'd think about trying to freeze some of it. Either that or you could look for a starter-sitter to feed it while you are gone. ;^)

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

Actually, two weeks is fine to keep your starter without feeding. Give it a generous feeding right before you leave and use enough flour to make it quite thick. Be careful about freezing. Many starters will survive freezing but some will not. Why don't you dry some? For drying you will want to start with a rather wet starter, about the consistency of pancake batter. Feed it and let it sit until it is very actively bubbly. Line a cookie sheet with waxed paper or freezer paper, shiny side up. Spread a few spoonfuls of your starter onto the paper with the back of a spoon. Don't use too much, as you want to spread it as thinly as possible. Set it aside to dry in a dust-free place. Mine usually dries overnight. It will then peel off the paper in flakes, which you can put in a ziploc bag. Label, date, and store it in the fridge. It will keep for months like this.

heymaryn's picture
heymaryn

Thanks! Great idea about freezing! I've never done this. What do you do to "start it up." I've been baking bread for years, but just recently started with sourdough. Don't know why I waited so long! The help is appreciated!

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

I use a kilner jar (wire seal) and fasten it tightly. The starter sitsi in the fridge happily and I've left it there weeks, before taking it out, stirring it and using some to restart - which it does happily with equal amounts of starter, water and flour ! It doesn't seem to suffocate....

Andrew

Bread Buddy's picture
Bread Buddy

I have not had good luck when freezing sourdough starter for long storage.  The drying method described by SourdoLady sounds like a better alternative for me.


My question is, how to I activate the starter when I am ready to use it?

wdlolies's picture
wdlolies

Hi,


This thread seems to have died somehow, or was it frozen?  I wonder myself how the sourdough is reactivated, whether from frozen or dried.


Kind Regards,


Wolfgang