The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Polish Cottage Rye & Multigrain Sourdough - Last weekend's breads

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Polish Cottage Rye & Multigrain Sourdough - Last weekend's breads

Polish Cottage Rye

Polish Cottage Rye

Polish Cottage Rye - Crumb

Polish Cottage Rye - Crumb

Multigrain Sourdough

Multigrain Sourdough

Multigrain Sourdough - Crumb

Multigrain Sourdough - Crumb

 

Both of these are breads I've baked several times before and enjoy a lot. This weekend, I ran out of King Arthur bread flour and substituted Golden Buffalo flour in both breads. We had some of the Multigrain Sourdough for breakfast. As I came out for breakfast, my wife, who was just finishing hers, greeted me with, "That's amazing bread." 

David

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Those look great.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

They're two of my favorites.  David

bwraith's picture
bwraith

David,

Those look great. Which recipes are these based on?

Interesting to see another use of Golden Buffalo. I've used that flour a lot at home.

Thanks, Bill

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Your breads look fantastic. I too would like to know which recipes you used. Great job.                    weavershouse

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks Bill and Weavershouse. 

The Polish Cottage Rye is from Daniel Leader's "Local Breads." The Multigrain SD is Jeffrey Hamelman's formula from "Bread."  

The multigrain is a flavor bomb. It uses a liquid starter (fed with first clear flour), a soaker of pumpernickel flour, rolled oats  and flax and sunflower seeds. The final dough adds whole wheat and bread flour and an instant yeast boost. If you do an optional cold fermentation, you leave out the yeast. 

I have made this bread with and without the cold fermentation. It is delicious both ways but even better with the cold fermentation.  

I'm still getting to know Golden Buffalo flour. I've used it in breads which I had previously made with first clear flour and, in the breads I made last weekend, as a substitute for bread flour. 

Bill, I know you have used it a lot. I'd appreciate your sharing your overall impression of what it offers in "performance" and flavor.  

David

bwraith's picture
bwraith

David,

I think of Golden Buffalo flour (Heartland Mill, available by mail order - they have a web site) as a sifted stone ground whole wheat flour made from high protein wheat. It is produced by taking their organic stone ground whole wheat flour and sifting it to remove a fairly large portion of the bran, which creates a flour that is high in ash content (around 1.15% - I ran tests on it at CII Labs in a blog entry) but low in bran, i.e. it still has much of the original germ and outer portions of the endosperm and inner seed coat but with relatively small proportions of the original bran. It is my favorite flour for use in situations where a "high extraction" flour is called for.

Although a passable substitute for high extraction flour is some mixture of whole wheat and white flour, it still is quite different from a true high extraction flour. In fact, a much closer approximation is to mix white flour with wheat germ and first clear flour and maybe some amount of bran, depending on what "extraction percentage" you want to simulate. As a rough approximation, you could say that a 50/50 mix of white and whole wheat flour has about the same ash content as Golden Buffalo, but the 50/50 blend would have half of the outer endosperm (approximated by first clear flour), and half of the germ but a much larger proportion of bran compared to Golden Buffalo flour.

Golden Buffalo flour is about halfway between white flour and whole wheat flour in ash content, with much of the bran removed, but not all. To produce substitutes for high extraction flours that have a lower ash content than Golden Buffalo, you can then reduce the ash content further by mixing white flour to get a lower extraction subsitute that is closer to in composition to any given high extraction flour with a lower extraction percentage. Also, you can add a little bran to raise the ash content if you want.

Lately, I've been playing with making my own high extraction flours by milling and then sifting them myself, using a gradual reduction milling and sifting process, which is the theme of a few recent blog entries. I'm not saying it's recommended reading, as it's an eccentric, mostly impractical personal diversion, but if you are interested in stone-ground and sifted high extraction flours, then you may find some good information embedded here and there in those entries. At the very least, the lab results include some analyses that were done on various Heartland Mill, Wheat Montana, and KA flours along the way.

Bill

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks, Bill. Your response to my question is really helpful. It merits more study and thought on my part. 

I'll come back with more questions, if you don't mind.

David

rainbowbrown's picture
rainbowbrown

Oh, the Polish Cottage Rye with Golden Buffalo sounds great. Ok, I've never tried Golden Buffalo unfortunately, but I still like the idea. Perhaps I'll try the Polish Cottage Rye with a whole wheat flour...maybe spelt. Very pretty loaves.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, rainbowbrown. 

If you do try the Polish Cottage Rye with whole wheat flour, let us know how it works.

I would want to be sure to develop the gluten really well. This bread has a very high proportion of rye sour, so it depends on the wheat flour for gluten to get the characteristic crumb. 

David

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hi David.  Great polish cottage rye!  I know it's been a while, but do you have the formula for this bread?  I have been searching for a rye recipe like this for some time.

John

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This is from Daniel Leader's Local Breads. I can't recall if anyone posted the formula on TFL, but it's in the book.

David

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thanks David. I will get my hands on it and try it out.

John