The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Laffa Recipe?

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Liss's picture
Liss

Laffa Recipe?

Hi! I had an amazing falafel the other day at a "mediterranian" restaurant. Well, no clue what ethnicity of food the restaurant actually supplied, but it was amazing. My falafel came wrapped in laffa, a thick, soft flatbread. Does anyone here have a recipe? Google yields ZERO results for "laffa recipe"!

Also, this is off topic, but does anyone know what sorts of pickled veggies might have been in my falafel, or have a recipe? 

Thanks,

Liss 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Mini O

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

These look similar to the pickles I've had with falafel:

 


http://www.recipezaar.com/73215

 

David

rainbowbrown's picture
rainbowbrown

Were the pickled veggies red and rectagluar? If so they were probably Pickled beets.  Awesome stuff.  I've never heard of laffa though.

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

That's a Norwegian flatbread, made, I gather, with mashed potatoes, though not always as I discovered reading one of my bread books last night.  It's soft, though.

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laffah

No recipe I'm afraid.  Hard to tell if it's leavened or not. I've never had the pleasure myself although I love falafel.

 

bshuval's picture
bshuval

A Laffa is a Lebanese/Iraqi flatbread, usually baked in a taboon or on a very hot surface called "saj" (In Israel, many times people use the two terms interchangeably). In Israel you can find it almost everywhere. The nearest thing I found here in the US are the flatbreads that they sell in the mediterranean stores.

The Laffa is very similar to what we call in Israel "Druze Pita"; the two are probably exactly the same thing, only that the Druze pita is much larger. 

Often times on the roadside in Israel you would see a woman stretching out balls of dough to very very thin sheets, and slapping (using a large pillow) them onto the hot saj. (The saj is a large metal bowl, turned upside down over burning embers. The breads would cook for several minutes, and then removed. The most common ways they sell these are either plain or together with Labneh, a sour yogurt cheese, Za'atar, a mediterranean spice mixture, and olive oil (sometimes the Labneh comes separately, sometimes already spread on the bread). Either way, it is always sold fresh.  

This flat bread is made from a very simple yeasted white-flour dough. Just use any pita bread dough recipe. Let it rise, divide into balls, and let rest for 10 minutes. Then, stretch very thinly only a floured pillow (any floured surface would do, but the pillow makes putting the pita on the saj easier. Turn a wok upside down on your largest burner, turned to high. Wait until it is very hot. Using the pillow, place the bread on the wok and cook until done. 

My bread blog: http://foldingpain.blogspot.com

sitzhaki's picture
sitzhaki

Do note that the dough has to be relatively wet to enable it to develop large bubble during the baking stage, and also not to dry out. It should be baked as quickly as possible on the hottest fire/oven, otherwise it will stay pale and dry as a cracker.

teekay's picture
teekay

I found this recipe while looking for a good shawarma recipe (which you also eat with laffa) 

I havent tried it yet, but I plan on making it for dinner...

The pickled veggie may very well be pickled baby eggplant (if it was purpleish)

Here is the site:

http://shawarmarecipe.com/taboon-lafah-bread-recipe/

All the best 

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

I published an authentic recipe for laffa from Israel on my blog a while ago. You can find it here.