The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Looking for Yellow Dent Corn

breadawe's picture
breadawe

Looking for Yellow Dent Corn

My wife and I are driving from Spokane to Reading, Pa in a couple of months and I would like to buy, 200 pounds or so, yellow dent corn along the way.  Leaving Spokane we will be on Hwy 90, then 94, through Chicago and on to Hwy 76 to Reading, Pa.

 Any suggestions as to where I might shop, along the way, would be appreciated.

Thanks, 

pjkobulnicky's picture
pjkobulnicky

This is just "field corn" and any feed mill in cattle or hog country ought to be able to supply sacks of it. Check out http://www.agway.com for locations in the Ohio/PA area.

 

Paul Kobulnicky

Baking in Ohio

breadawe's picture
breadawe

Thanks Paul.....My concern is "field" yellow dent corn may not be cleaned up enough for human consumption.  I'll give Agway a call....thanks for the tip.

audra36274's picture
audra36274

It is a dollar or so a bag more, but you don't have the chaf and as much dust. I live in Alabama and most every feed and seed here has it.

                                                                                   Audra 

carlazielke's picture
carlazielke

Hi, have you checked with Wheat Montana in Big Fork MT  Also Walton Food in Montpiealer Idaho they both have a web sites. good luck

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

when its very mature. (A sure sign of tough and mealy.)

Dent corn? Snipe hunting? How about Red Dent corn? or Blue? The real natural wildly colored corn might be interesting.... sometimes it's dented too. Na, go with the Red. Heck, April Fool!

Did I ever tell you guys about the time I planted naturally mixed colored corn in a field (next to my house) in indonesia?  They thought it was hexed because they'd never knew it came other than yellow.  They wondered if I was a witch anyway because I was blond.  There were tales in that area where we lived about a blond witch that seduced lone men when traveling through the nearby forest.   ...Naturally no one traveled the road alone if they could help it. 

Mini O

audra36274's picture
audra36274

as miniOven pointed out. The corn gets a dent as sugar is used up in the kernel leaving behind a small empty space in it, which as it dries leaves a dent. But the variety Breadawe is referring to I think is called Reids Yellow Dent. It s a variety of field corn, which is totally different from sweet corn that can be eaten raw, boiled, or frozen. Field corn has a tough outer skin that can  be removed using wood ash, lye, or a number of other caustic means. It seems harsh, but it frees up niacin to be used in the body. A lot of field corn today is used for animal feed, hominy, or ground for grits and corn meal. It makes our tortillas and corn chips. Here in the south, it is also cut off the cob and cooked, but treated differently than sweet corn. It is cooked longer, and with bacon dripping and salt, and is quite yummy along side a vine ripe tomato from your garden, and a slice of salty ham! Don't you just feel your arteries tightening up! It's funny that the world sure eats a lot of tortillas and chips to not know what field corn is! What did you do with your Indian corn in Indonesia mini, flat breads or tortillas? What did you use to remove the tough outer layer? Very interesting stuff! Since it seems to suit you,you are very lucky to have done so much traveling.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

But I sure had fun!  I had to show them the picture on the seed package.  It made for lots of fishing village conversation and practical jokes.  I also showed them pop corn, used to make it in a wok with a basket over the top.  Pop corn doesn't have dents.

I like the first ear of every sweet corn season raw.  That's the best.  If you sneak up on field corn in the "milk" stage, it too is very tasty... both raw and cooked.   Just don't leave evidence for any raccoons to find.   They like it too.  

Mini O