The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Yeast-risen cornmeal bread (no-knead)

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krusty's picture
krusty

Yeast-risen cornmeal bread (no-knead)

For those familiar with the no-knead method, here's a recipe that I formulated and tried last week.  The result surpassed my expectations. 

For one loaf:

250 grams unbleached white flour

100 grams fine-ground cornmeal

2 tsps (10 grams) vital wheat gluten

275 grams water

1/2 tsp instant yeast

1 tsp sea salt 

Mix all ingredients thoroughly.  Let the dough rise until doubled, or refigerate overnight, and leave it to come to room temperature and rise.  Either way, it will take about four hours.  Shape the dough and let it rest for an hour, lightly covered with plastic wrap.  It will rise some more. 

Bake covered at 500 for 30 minutes, then uncovered at 450 for ten minutes.

theavidbaker's picture
theavidbaker

I made a similiar bread to the one you posted above using James Beard's version from his book, Beard on Bread. However, this one requires a bit of kneading (but not to worry, it is not labour intensive).


It has a firm structure to it, a tightly woven crumb and a toothsome texture.  It is perfect for slicing and using to make sandwiches with, and even french toast if desired. 


This does not however taste like traditional cornbread (which is made using leaveners rather than yeast like this recipe does). 


I used a medium grind cornmeal because I did not want an overly coarse texture to my bread.  The used of dark brown sugar helps to caramelize the exterior beautifully.  The loaves also freeze well wrapped in ziplock bags.


I've posted the recipe on my blog-


http://theavidbaker.wordpress.com/2011/01/20/southern-comfort/


 


Cheers and Happy Baking!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

reallly nice recipe, Theavidbaker - I was looking for a sandwich type cornbread different from the flat ones I make to go with baked beans.


Karin

theavidbaker's picture
theavidbaker

Thank you!


Have fun with the recipe and enjoy your bread.


 


http://theavidbaker.wordpress.com

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Avidbaker, I just looked at your recipe again - what do you mean by "proof yeast and sugar in warm water" - just stir it to dissolve, and let sit until the cornmeal mix has cooled down?


Karin

theavidbaker's picture
theavidbaker

Hi Karin,


I interpreted those instructions in terms of allowing the active dry yeast to get a head start in 'waking up' the active bacterial culture (it takes longer than instant yeast... because well, it's instant.haha.  Personally I prefer it over the active dry variety because you can typically skip this step of 'proofing' and add the yeast right into the dry mixture).


Wait till the active dry yeast gets all frothy and bubbly, then add it to your mixture (it is also a good way fo knowing if your yeast is still fresh and alive).


 


Hope this helps!


Cheers and Happy Baking,


Tiff


 http://theavidbaker.wordpress.com

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Yes, that is what I thought you meant, but I wanted to make sure. I also prefer instant yeast to active dry, but follow the instructions on "giving the yeast a head start" from ABED if I do S & F, instead of pre-doughs.


Thanks,


Karin