The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Same Basic Recipe/Different Handling

  • Pin It
Susan's picture
Susan

Same Basic Recipe/Different Handling

One-DayOne-day, 100g starter

Sponge-basedSponge-based, 50g starter

There were a couple of differences:
The One-day dough subbed 40g WWW, and added 1/8-cup sesame seeds
The Sponge-based dough added 1T oil.

Amazing difference, huh?

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Huh. That is interesting. Quite different crumb.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Were they proofed and baked together? Is that the All Trumps?

Susan's picture
Susan

No, they weren't proofed and baked on the same day. One day apart. I did try to handle them the same, though. They were both baked in my Visions DO.

Susan from San Diego

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

How did the taste compare?

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Hi,

 

Do you know which recipe you used for the bread in the top photo made with 100g starter? I've been searching and made copies of a couple of your other recipes but hope you know which recipe this one was. Thanks so much...............weavershouse

Susan's picture
Susan

I used 100g starter, 350g water, 500g hi-gluten flour, 10g salt. A very basic recipe.

Mix, a few french folds, 30 min rest, a few S&F's 30 minutes apart, set until doubled, divide, rest a few minutes, shape, rest a few minutes, put in banneton, let rise until doubled, turn out and bake covered in preheated 500F oven, temp lowered to 450F when the dough goes in. Remove cover after 16-18 minutes. Bake until well browned. Or, whatever works for you!

You are quite welcome. Have fun. You've got rye down pat, what's your secret?

Susan from San Diego

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Copied and part of "soon to bake" list. I love that it's simple and basic.

 

As far as the rye goes I try to keep it simple too and usually use the recipe I put together some time ago using info from lots of places and baked under cover. Other times I do Eric's or David's rye or Greenstein (sp?) Rye. Which ever one I feel like at the time but the main thing is I never knead rye, I only do stretch and fold no matter what the recipe says. To me rye is impossible to knead but stretch and fold works great. I love rye.

 

Thanks again for looking that up for me.  It would be interesting to see how others here keep their records of bread baking and how they keep track of all the good stuff scattered all over The Frest Loaf. When I was looking through your posts I saw a lot of things I wish I had copied (or maybe did copy and can't find). I have several folders stuffed with copies I've made but they aren't in any kind of order that makes sense. Gotta get a plan.

                                                                                                                              weavershouse

Susan's picture
Susan

Hehehehehe. I have notes strung all over, and my husband complains about all the seeds and grains and nuts and tubs of starter in the fridge; no room for his beer. So I'm not the one to ask about organization!

What little I have organized is on my computer, which lives on a desk at the end of my kitchen. You should see me running back and forth from the counter to the desk, following a recipe! I keep specific recipes (with very descriptive names, and dates) in a Bread Folder on my computer desktop. Usually I save them with the TextEdit feature so that they pop up quickly and I don't have to wait for a huge program like MSWord to load.

Did you two see the Onion Ring recipe I linked to yesterday? Wow, they look delish!

Weaver, thanks for the folding tip on rye. I get frustrated with the stickiness, so that will help.

Should I post some of my colossal (adjective: so great in size or force or extent as to elicit awe) sourdough failures? Nah! Though sometimes I feel bad for TFL newbies who think everyone started out with gorgeous bread and never had a failure. Hah! I just had a huge fight with my starter, but I managed to subdue the thing and get it back under control.

Susan from San Diego

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I did see the onion ring recipe and they do look delicious. I bookmarked it but hope I forget about them!  They look tooo good and I'm afraid they'd become a regular. If I find a nice Vidalia though I might have to give it a try.

 

You're right about the newbies looking at the great photos and not seeing many failures but if they keep reading they'll see we all started at the beginning and time and practice will make it happen for them too. I remember when I first found this site I was amazed at the bread coming out of the ovens of homebakers. I almost couldn't believe it. I've been baking bread for over 30 years but most of my improvement happened after finding this site.

 

 

Glad you won the fight with your starter.                                           weavershouse

edh's picture
edh

Those are lovely Susan!

I think I'd like one of the first for sopping up olive oil, and the second for toast and sandwiches...

Weavershouse; I'm with you on the organization stuff. I have a great method; I bought a notebook, meaning to keep notes of what I'm doing on various recipes, filled about 4 pages, and have now burst the seams with all the printouts (in no order at all) from this site that I've shoved in there for future reference. Gotta get another method!

edh

Digger57's picture
Digger57

The Great use of grains is bread making. OH YA!!

Wow what great looking loaves. You should be very proud. Digger57