The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

First time making puff pastry

JimmyWatson's picture
JimmyWatson

First time making puff pastry

Hi everybody! I have been thinking of trying to make puff pastry for a while, but I have some doubts about the process.

  1. Type of flour My first question is about the flour used in the détrempe. Some recipes suggest a strong flou https://sarkariresult.onl/

  2. r, some a mix of 00 flour and manitoba and other a weak flour. I found different opinions and reasons about the use of each flour, so I'm quite lost.

  3. Butter in the détrempe and flour in the butter I knew the détrempe was made with just cold water, flour and salt, but some reci mobdro

  4. pes add melted butter into it. Do I have to add butter to the détrempe or not? And finally, do I need to add flour to room temperature butter before putting it in the détrempe?

I know these are a lot of questions, but I'm quite intimidated eheh. Thanks in advance!https://pnrstatus.vip/

BaniJP's picture
BaniJP

1. I wouldn't use cake flour, because you need a certain amount of strength in the dough. So I would recommend AP or a semi-strong bread flour (or a mix). I made them once and used standard AP with 12% protein, worked great.

2. Usually the détemptre is slightly sweet, yeasted dough. The dough I used had a little butter in it, but really just like 5% or so.
About the flour in the butter I don't know. I guess it's easier to handle that way later, but it's certainly not necessary. I used only butter and it was fine.

ds99303's picture
ds99303

Puff pastry does not have yeast in it.  Danish pastry dough and croissant dough do.

BaniJP's picture
BaniJP

Oh I thought it's only about the amount of folds, didn't know that :)

ds99303's picture
ds99303

Treat puff pastry as you would a flaky pie crust.  You don't want to use a high gluten flour.  You're not making bread.  You want the gluten content to be fairly low so the final product is tender but still strong enough that you can roll out the dough and do all the turns without it tearing.  The recipe I use calls for half all-purpose flour and half pastry flour by volume.  Pastry flour has slightly more protein than cake flour but has less than all-purpose flour.  It's difficult to find though.  You could use a combination of cake flour and all-purpose but I would increase the ratio of all-purpose flour to cake flour from 1 to 1 to maybe 2 to 1.  So if the recipe called for a total of 2 cups of flour, you would use 1 1/3 cups of all-purpose flour and 2/3 cups cake flour.  Another suggestion is to use an all-purpose flour made from winter wheat.  They have a lower protein content and are popular in the southern U.S.  Two popular brands are White Lilly and Martha White.  If worse come to worse, any all-purpose flour will work in a pinch.  Just stay away from the bread flours and other high protein/gluten flours.

 

I've seen recipes where butter is put in the détrempe but I don't think it's necessary.  I mean you're already laminating butter into the dough.  So putting butter in the détrempe seems rather redundant.  I do however put a little flour in the butter.  It makes it easier to work with.  Finally, you do not bring the butter to room temperature.  In all laminated doughs you want the fat, in this case butter, to be cold so the layers of fat remain separate from the layers of dough.  Otherwise, you won't get the distinct flaky layers.  When the pastry bakes, these layers of butter melt and create steam which puffs the layers of dough up.  For maximum puff in puff pastry, chill the item(s) before baking.  This allows the layers of dough to bake and set before the butter melts.  If the butter melts too soon,it will blend in with the dough and cause the layers to fuse together and not puff up as much as they should.