The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cast Aluminum Dutch Oven

gerryp123's picture
gerryp123

Cast Aluminum Dutch Oven

Been looking for a 6 qt oval Dutch Oven.  Readily available, but a bit pricey.

Just happened to find a used flea-market  "vintage" roasting pot (w/cover) made of heavy cast-aluminum.  Probably dates from 1940's. Measures 9"x12" at rim; about 4,5" high. Cover adds another inch to height. Cost me only a couple of bucks. Worth a try.

Will use this for Dutch Oven bread-baking?  Would have preferred (Lodge) cast iron but perhaps this will be fine in a convection oven which evenly distributes the heat.

Your thoughts?

davey1025's picture
davey1025

I have an old one like you described and it bakes beautifully. they thing I like about it is that the sides are more steep and makes a nicer looking loaf I think, Def more height to it than my standard D O

 

Will be looking for your photos from it

Dave

gerryp123's picture
gerryp123

Assuming dimensions are as above, how large a loaf will this DO bake?  Weight of flour + water + starter ?

davey1025's picture
davey1025

and say 750g. I usually don't make loaves bigger than that. the alum pot I am talking about is from my great grandmother who only used it to boil potatoes I am told I used it maybe 4 times for bread and the high heat was turning it dark so I stopped using it. but the loaves it made were nice......more round than anything

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I have an aluminum covered Dutch Oven also. I removed the synthetic knob on the top and filled the hole with a screw and nut. It bakes as well as the cast iron DO.

gerryp123's picture
gerryp123

Got to thinking on just how important a heavy cast metal (iron or aluminum) pot might be for Dutch Oven bread baking.  Can see the value when using a heat source with uneven distribution (ie outdoor cooking), but I bake in a convection oven where the heat is fairly even.

So, is thick-walled cast DO really needed?

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I think the greatest value of a DO is it’s steam holding ability. I often use light weight graniteware to accomplish the same thing. A cover inverted over the top of the dough and on a stone also produces good results.

Even a light weight disposable aluminum roasting pan on top of a stone will work.

Try to keep the steam close to the dough for the first 20 minutes or so of the bake.

Dan