The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Blend to Reduce Carbs in Flour?

doughooker's picture
doughooker

Blend to Reduce Carbs in Flour?

This may be a good idea or a bad one.

Any ideas for reducing the carb content of regular flour (AP, WW or bread) by adding another flour with a lower carb count?

In other words, say, 50% AP and 50% nut flour of some sort, or carbalose? Or some other proportions?

I have made biscuits with almond flour in the past and they turned out great, but it's expensive. I've also used soy flour and it's OK.

Ideas?

David R's picture
David R

(a) Are you reinventing the wheel? Surely someone has had this idea before?

(b) Why not pick one of the suggestions you just made and try it in a side-by-side, one loaf all regular flour and one loaf mixed?

doughooker's picture
doughooker

"Why not pick one of the suggestions you just made and try it"

I'm looking for something someone has already tried and can recommend.

"Are you just trying to reduce your carb intake?"

I'm trying to make a bread with a lower carb content by "diluting" or blending wheat flour with another, lower-carb flour.

There are other ways to reduce carb intake such as eating bread less frequently (for control of type 2 diabetes).

I'm looking to reduce the carb content of the bread itself without giving up much quality.

I've tried a baking mix called "Carbquik" and it's awful.

Carbalose flour is lacking in flavor for bread but makes decent pasta.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Are you just trying to reduce your carb intake? Go totally keto? Avoid gluten? Is cost a major factor?

If you are just trying to reduce your carb intake, a hybrid of wheat flour and low carb flour may give you the best results in terms of texture similar to a full flour product. Your carb intake will still be significant.

Going lower carb does not necessarily reduce calorie content. In fact, when you go low carb to the keto level you can actually increase your calorie intake compared to a "normal" carb level diet.

Because it is trendy, all the low/no carb and GF sources are greatly inflated in price.  If you can find a co-op or bulk sale store as a source, it may be a little cheaper. We have Bulk Nation stores here-all they sell is bulk product by weight in plastic bags.

Good luck.

 

 

 

David R's picture
David R

(I certainly agree that it's very difficult to help when the post is essentially "Here's my proposed solution, will it work?" - but the actual problem/question/motivation is omitted, and there's no background information. For the bare question "Can I mix two things together?" - the best answer is probably "Yes, go ahead." 🙂)

jbovenbread's picture
jbovenbread

You may wish to check out various options using a recipe analyzer.  I use the one available at    http://www.eatracker.ca/ .  It does not have every ingredient under the sun, but it is pretty good for my needs.

 

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

This is a great site for conventional baking but when it comes to low carb,keto,GF,etc., it is not the best site. I have been a poster for SO many years and bakers here are , for the most part, just not very experienced in the kind of specialty you are asking about. A very few have some experience but not many. Even if your goal is not to go carb free/keto, I do recommend you try some of those specialty blogs for ideas. You may have a similar reaction there because you are asking for a sub-specialty.

However, if you are interested in experimentation, I would love to follow your progress and contribute ideas. You do need a recipe that you have made before and are comfortable with. Also, a development recipe does not have to be more than enough for a dinner roll.First of all, I suggest you take the low carb ingredient of your choice and substitute it for 20% (as a starting point) for flour in a recipe you are familiar with. This is best done if you are starting with a recipe already given in grams rather than volume measures (cups). However, if cups is what you have, start there and sub. about 1/5 of the flour. Always hold back some of the liquid as different ingredients have different needs for moisture. If the dough is dry-keep adding liquid (and keep track of how mmuch) until the dough feels right. Proceed.

Pictures are very helpful for diagnosing a loaf-both crust and crumb shots. Come on back and don't be discouraged.

doughooker's picture
doughooker

In doing my on-line research, it seems a lot of people like almond flour, even though it is expensive.

To save money, one could mill it at home.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Almonds can not be milled in most grain mills as they are too oily and gum up the works. It is hard for the home miller to grind the almonds fine enough without turning it into almond butter. Finely ground almond flour can be found here and there for less but, unfortunately, it is generally more expensive. Coconut flour isn't far behind but ground flax s often used and is much cheaper. The down side is that it has a distinct appearance and flavor. Make sure to get FRESH ground flax or it smells/tastes like furniture grade linseed oil.

doughooker's picture
doughooker

Lesson Learned #1:

50% WW flour and 50% almond flour is not a happy combination.

Next try: 75% WW flour and 25% almond flour.

The carb content is already reduced by switching from white flour to WW.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

1. The carb level in WW is not that much less than in AP flour but you do gain fiber and micronutrients.

2. Just substituting WW flour in a recipe will give you a much denser consistency. Different handling is required to get the fluffiest possible crumb from WW. Autolyse or a soak with extra water, kneading to windowpane,etc. Almond flour will already add density and can benefit from a bit of soaking time.

Low carb bread is often more of a tea/quick bread consistency (think banana bread) than fluffy loaf. It is hard to achieve fluffiness without gluten strands to trap the bubbles.

Since gluten is not a problem, why don't you try using 75% almond flour and 25% vital wheat gluten? VWG is much lower in carbs than flour. This may give you the structure you are looking for. Post pics.

 

 

 

doughooker's picture
doughooker

"Since gluten is not a problem, why don't you try using 75% almond flour and 25% vital wheat gluten? VWG is much lower in carbs than flour."

Good idea. I'll try that.

In attempt #1 I was trying for a sour effect by adding my lactic/acetic acid combo described elsewhere. Flavor-wise it was a dud and the dough was difficult to handle. However, it rose, had a crumb and an interesting flavor, discounting the acids I had added, kind of like barley bread. It had definite possibilities if you're not expecting sour.

So no more trying for low-carb sour. The lactic/acetic acid combo works great with white AP or bread flour and I am very pleased with the flavor. Thanks, USDA.

I have a Mockmill and a Ninja chopper. I think almond oil would gum up the Mockmill but the Ninja might be able to handle almonds.

doughooker's picture
doughooker

I just saw this recipe in another thread:

"The basic recipe is 2 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup Vital Wheat Gluten, 1/2 cup bread starter, 1 pack of Stevia pinch salt and 1 1/2 Tbs olive oil.  About 1/3 cup filtered water 110 temp"

So 100 g almond flour and 50 g VWG, omitting the starter, stevia and olive oil and adding 3 1/2 g instant dry yeast and 1/2 tsp salt.

doughooker's picture
doughooker

"100 g almond flour and 50 g VWG, omitting the starter, stevia and olive oil and adding 3 1/2 g instant dry yeast and 1/2 tsp salt."

Oh boy, you don't want to even try this recipe. It's awful. The high proportion of VWG makes it as dry as sawdust and the flavor just isn't there.

I think the VWG was a bad idea. For me it's back to WW flour and deal with the carbs.

Next try: 100 g almond flour, 50 g WW.

Experimentation is part of the process.

David R's picture
David R

In my opinion the "diabetic person vs. bread" question turns out to vary between people, depending on how much you like bread, and where you want to be on the quantity vs. quality spectrum. And your experiment here is hopefully going to create a new point on the quantity/quality graph - another option. And hey, as long as it tastes better than sawdust, and is lower carb than plain white bread, someone somewhere will find it useful.