The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello from Minnesota

Jeramiah's picture
Jeramiah

Hello from Minnesota

I just wanted to check in here. I found the site while looking for a multi grain bread recipe. Any direction to a great recipe would be helpful.

 

I have been loving the artisan bread baking in my dutch oven.

MichaelLily's picture
MichaelLily

Welcome on behalf of all the FreshLoafers. Where in Minnesota are you? I own a bakery in Duluth.

You will find some good starting points in the tutorials on this site, and use the search bar to unearth more information than you probably need. The only time the search bar failed me was when I searched “malooga” (malooga is a real thing).

Jeramiah's picture
Jeramiah

I am in Sartell. Down by St. Cloud.

I have been using Ken Forkish's Flour Water Salt Yeast. I have been loving it. I actually have been working these past few nights and didn't have time to look at his book for his recipe. I am assuming there is one in there. But as I learn a few basic things I would like to expand of ideas and what not.

I did come across a few recipes on here using the search. This forum seems to be pretty vast in its resources.

hreik's picture
hreik

We just had a community bake of Hamelman's 5 grain levain.  It is a spectacular bread.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/59038/community-bake-hamelmans-fivegrain-levain

Good luck

hester

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Welcome to the forum.

The Five-Grain Levain is oustanding.

Danny

David R's picture
David R

One of the main things about that one (and most of Hamelman's recipes) is: There are lots of people who make really good bread. There are far fewer who make really good bread and write their recipes so that everyone else has the maximum chances of getting the same result as the original.

Many in older generations had a very good excuse for the sloppy explanations in their recipes: "Of course you know, I just showed you how!" Recipes handed down from parent to child (or from boss to employee) would often leave out vital information, and it didn't matter because it was understood. Modern recipe writers have to write for people who don't know them, and who have probably learned from someone else.

I've seen Hamelman's book get some criticism overseas, for sometimes giving USA-only information as if it was universal - but otherwise - well, look for complaints of mysterious failure using his recipes, and you find very few.

Jeramiah's picture
Jeramiah

Thanks for that info. I just now mention that I had been using Ken Forkish's Four Water Salt Yeast book and I have learned a few basics. I will look into Hamelman.

Jeramiah's picture
Jeramiah

Thank you so much. I will check it out. Maybe attempt to find everything I need and bake this weekend.

hreik's picture
hreik

I also started with Forkish.  Somehow he gave me confidence  and  I waited 6 months b/f I even got Hamelman's book. 

Good luck and keep us posted

hester

Jeramiah's picture
Jeramiah

Forkish makes it easy. Gave me confidence as well. I have never shared my baked goods at work because I always thought they were good but didn't want to be disappointed by bad "reviews" from co workers. Now I am bringing in Caramel rolls and bread all of the time it seems.