The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

bread turns raw?

doudouuu's picture
doudouuu

bread turns raw?

Hi,

Im very new on hame baking... I normally do 2 recepies and were working well until recently. Bread is perfect the first day... it seems fully cooked everywhere.. but the problem appears later..after a day or so.. it seems raw? or uncooked? I starts being soggy from one side and I realise it is one side near where I normally fail the crust... As you can see the crust is uneven as it cracks while rasing ... I think it may be my bread is absorbing kitchen moisture?

The recepie has only one rise and is cooked 220 degress 30 to 35 min

300 whitle bread flour

300 brown bread flour

375ml water

25g oil

1 1/4 sugar

1 1/4 yest

1 1/4 salt

 

 

 

 

 

doudouuu's picture
doudouuu

Or maybe I just need to leave it longer in the oven? As I said before, the first day.. Is not soggy at all... and I dont want to leave it for very very long in the oven because my kids dont like eating very crusty bread....

David R's picture
David R

I suggest that you try cooking it for a longer time, just to see if that helps. That seems to be your guess, and you are probably right, because you have seen the entire process.

If longer cooking helps, then the problem is solved. If it doesn't help, then you can find something else to try.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Are you allowing the loaf to completely cool down before slicing? It would be helpful if you placed a thermometer in the middle of the dough immediately after coming out of the oven. 205 or above should be good.

Dan

David R's picture
David R

He means 96° in real terms. 🙂

That's to know that the inside is cooked.

It should be near cold before you cut the first slice. Don't cut it warm.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

placing the slice into a zipper bag and keeping an eye on the wet area to see if it expands over the next few days.  Draw a boarder around the edge of the wet area with a permanent marker if it helps.

If you find the wet area expanding, smelling like overripe melons and  slices pull apart creating "strings" or filaments between the slices, bag up the loaf and throw it away.  Then wash the boards and knives and counter tops, and baking pans and utensils with hot soap water and finish with a misting of vInegar to air dry.  You could be dealing with a "Rope" invasion.  The first sign of rope looks like an oil spot and smells sweet.  It soon expands in size.   Let's hope the bread is just undercooked and behaves itself.  

OldLoaf's picture
OldLoaf

Mini, great advice.  I found a research paper, that exapnds on what you describe it may help the OP diagnose his/her situation.  Here is the link

Scroll down to section 2

Jeff

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I also note salt (sodium chloride) is low, just above 1%.  Does it need to be so low?