The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Oat flaker?

Sid Post's picture
Sid Post

Oat flaker?

I'm looking for an Oat Flaker for home use.  The Komo models at PHG primarily have my attention.  What are the good models and brands at various common price points for reasonable household quantities of flaked grains, in my case mainly oats?

 

I see the hand crank model at ~$140 and the electric one at ~$460.  Is the electric model really worth ~$300 more than the hand crank model?  What else should I consider like noise or possibly other things?  Or, how about different brands that may be better or worse than the two Komo units I'm looking at?

 

TIA,

Sid

Our Crumb's picture
Our Crumb

I have been very satisfied with my Komo FlicFloc for the past year or two that I've owned it.  I've put all kinds of grains and pulses through it without any problems other than those attributable to my not taking soaked seeds down to the right moisture point prior to flaking - knowledge that comes with trial and error where errors are minor misdemeanors, not felonies.  The only complaint one might have with its operation is that it's slow going.  The mechanical advantage of the FlicFloc's mechanism is somewhat greater (or would that be less?) than it needs to be, imho.  That is, you can often turn it with your pinkie, depending on what grain you're flaking.  Thus it's easy to turn, but slow to process if you want to fill a quart mason with product.  Like pedaling a 10-speed on a level road in first gear.  Easy but slow.  The importance of that downside depends on what kind of volume you envision running through it.  But overall a brilliantly engineered device.  Highly recommended.

Happy flaking,

Tom

David R's picture
David R

You can seriously flake beans, lentils, etc? I never imagined that.

charbono's picture
charbono

I use a Schnitzer with steel rollers. Stone rollers are also available. To get big flakes and minimal flour, one must moisten the groats and wait a few hours. It's easy to crank, but one must crank rapidly to keep the intake flowing. A thumb is needed to keep the exhaust chute clear. Not recommended for more than a few cups at a time.

 

Grainmaker makes a large, expensive flaker.

 

Sid Post's picture
Sid Post

The Grainmaker mill and flaker sure are nice.  If I was flaking for cattle and other livestock, sure but, it is just way too big to be practical for me.

Our Crumb's picture
Our Crumb

You can flake anything small enough to be grabbed by the rollers.  Dal sized lentils are fine.  Split peas, not so good.  Forget garbanzos, but split small garbanzos [= Chana dal] can work.  South Indian chutneys call for frying dry dal but I prefer to soak any and all legumes before use and drying down and flaking them flat has worked nicely for chutney.  I've also put other soaked, dried legumes through and used them here and there.  They cook a lot faster when reduced to two dimensions beforehand by the FlicFloc.  Same goes for brown rice, in a big way, but that's for another thread.  A flaker is one of those tools that invites experimentation.

Tom

Sid Post's picture
Sid Post

Thanks Tom!  That is pretty interesting though, I don't think I'll be flaking many legumes right now but, who knows where things will end up once I have one!

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

https://pleasanthillgrain.com/marcato-marga-mulino-multigrain-flaker

it is a wonderful piece of equipment. It works perfectly. I bought mine through " google express" and lucked on to a $20 off coupon for first time purchasers. So it was $86.99 not the $106 they list it for many places or the $119 listed here. So you can shop around. It will flake all but the hardest like corn. You need to wet the grain , except oat groats, before you flake it and then let it dry a few hours . This softens it enough to flake. It is plenty for home use. Also it is better not to flake ahead as the germ is now exposed and since it isn't being steam treated as commercial oats is your home flaked grains will be rancid in short order if stored at room temp. Hope this helps your search. c

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

it is suggested for all grains but oats that you wet the grain in a sieve then let it rest a few hours then flake. The commercial oats are steamed and dried thus killing the germ. So I don’t have any oat groats. I wet 100 g of Kamut and let it air dry for 4 hrs. Flaked it and this is what I got. Very pretty and smells wonderful!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Caroline, is it a slow process to flake? How long for 100g kamut?

...like I need another appliance :-D

Danny

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

is all it takes. You have to turn the crank and let the grains flow through. I used the brush that came with the mill to help the grains continue to flow through. It isn't anything arduous :) just getting used to the whole process and also I started with wheat not oats. I like the " hands on" process rather than a motor. c

David R's picture
David R

Do you mean that oat groats are already steamed and dried? Or only that commercially flaked oats are?

charbono's picture
charbono

Oat groats intended for human consumption are heat treated to prevent rancidity.

Edit:  So-called Hulless Oats Avena nuda are not treated.  They can be sprouted.

David R's picture
David R

Ah, understood. Thanks!

Our Crumb's picture
Our Crumb

I've found that spelt is the hands-down favorite for creating picture perfect flakes.  For some reason, overnight soaking of spelt and drying it in the dehydrator without heat until it is surface-dry to the touch yields absolutely perfect, intact flakes and almost no grit or flour.  Every other grain I've flaked breaks up to some extent with or without soaking/drying.  Spelt is just destined to be flaked.  Just wish we liked the taste of it more 😏.

On the other hand, producing perfect intact single seed derived flakes is not absolutely required for all grains processed through a flaker.  At the other end of the spectrum is unsoaked raw brown rice.  It comes out as broken flakes and cooks up in only 20 minutes into a slice-able, polenta-like cake.  Good news is even with just salt added to the cooking water, it tastes infinitely better than hour-long cooked intact brown rice.  I now firmly believe that brown rice's bad rap comes from the decidedly negative flavor consequences of typically having to boil the life out of the intact grains for an hour or more to render them edible.  And simple additions to the cooking water of flaked brown rice elevate it to delectable levels:  Saffron is hard to beat, but various curry powders, garam masala, powdered bottarga or even just a bullion cube all create a product that mercifully resembles not at all the cardboardy blandness of typical brown rice.

So there's my pitch (again) for flaked, cooked, flavored brown rice.  And no, I am not on the Lundberg's payroll.

Tom

David R's picture
David R

On another board where I lurked briefly, a brown rice discussion took place. One person, who shared your opinion of the standard method of cooking it, had just got a rice cooker or pressure cooker or something (I can't remember what) and came back a while later saying she liked brown rice now. It's definitely the cooking method that makes the difference, at least if you include flaking as a possible part of cooking methods. It seems that "Just simmer it in an ordinary pot", which works fine for white rice, doesn't do that well with brown rice.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

several different grains at different moisture levels. I weighed the kamut before and after soaking. A 100g sample after brief wetting was 125. At 4 hrs it was 112g. That is when I rolled it. I plan to do the same measurements/timing with other grains and see what happens as far as texture etc. I am using the grains for soakers to make breads not to eat as breakfast porridge. When I get the oat groats that Breadtopia just got in stock I will try it without and with soaking and let y'all  know how that goes. 

Always interesting things to try . c